Ignat Solovey

Ignat Solovey

Lives in Russian Federation Moscow, Russian Federation
Works as a photojournalist
Joined on Jul 24, 2004

Comments

Total: 441, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Jefftan: unless for crop, what use is so many resolution

(↑) Not sure that I'll find any use for it, let alone that I have to do it in god-awful hours like 5 AM in the morning (and in a very good weather, as well as really quick, to adjust for changing light) and with some smaller camera to avoid trouble with Federal Guards, who for some are really concerned when “professional gear” being used on the Red Square cobblestone without their express permission, so I'll have to either do it without a tripod or from a curb that goes along the place, but in the end I'll have a huge image that will the limits of things like Durst Lambda 131 even at its native 254 dpi resolution. In this case even some preliminary calculations will do, because dimensions of everything are known and I'll have only do watch sufficient overlapping.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 22:37 UTC
In reply to:

Jefftan: unless for crop, what use is so many resolution

@anticipation_of Large prints is an obvious case, but there is one interesting limitation to those prints too. Unless you don't want to scratch your nose crawling around a 2×3 meter (6'7"×9'10" for those Stateside) print made with some über-expensive 12-color photo plotter on a finest glossy paper, or make yourself another “Blow Up” guy (that movie is 50 years old this year... time surely does fly), you don't need high resolution for something bigger than DIN A2 and smaller than DIN A0 formats. I printed things 22 meters wide with ≈30'000 pixel wide file, those were indoor backdrops for presidential events in Moscow, and I myself, knowing these files pixel by pixel, had no problems with detail watching them from ≈3 meters, let alone further. Sure enough, those were rasterized vector files, but had this been stacked panorama of similar dimensions, I doubt that anyone would have any objections. Actually, I guess, I have try to create a long panorama of the Red Square moving along it. (↓)

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 22:24 UTC
In reply to:

Kerity: Now that's f*tastic! Tourists will really look like pros taking photos with an aïe-phone, a huge tripod, and attach a big lens AND pro-square filters on it. This brilliant innovation should really be given a kick start. Plus, it looks very handy and easy to use.

@Kerity I don't see any magnets in this specific mount. What I see is a clip-on, screw-on, slide-in system which design was snatched from Lee and Cokin. Maybe I'm not attentive enough and miss something.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2018 at 07:37 UTC
In reply to:

Kerity: Now that's f*tastic! Tourists will really look like pros taking photos with an aïe-phone, a huge tripod, and attach a big lens AND pro-square filters on it. This brilliant innovation should really be given a kick start. Plus, it looks very handy and easy to use.

@Kerity sometimes it's our perfectionism rather than a demand that moves the things. I can't provide hard proof of the source of the following quote, as I didn't yet manage find the magazine the man who repeatedly told it through the years, and that man died several years ago, but its style confirms its credibility. In 1908, reviewing the Autochrome (then a very new thing) exhibition held in Riga, then the capital of Lifland governorship of the Russian Empire in an article, allegedly from The Notes of the Russian Photographic Society Journal, its original author stated: “Photographic equipment now reached a degree of perfection so high that it seemingly is not worthwhile to even dream of anything better”. These were the words of a very dedicated photographer, albeit not of a bread-and-butter kind. Also, I don't think that many apps or even servers-side applications can already cope with poor h/w specs in real time, simultaneously feeding a live stream online from the very same device.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 22:32 UTC
In reply to:

Mike CH: With all those accessories for smartphones - filters, anamorphic lenses etc - we are rapidly approaching the point where the phone might very well be smaller than old-style cameras...

... but the bag to carry the accessories with be much, much larger :-)

@SantaFeBill just don't tell that stuff about bicycles to guys who compete at Tour de France and Giro d'Italia ;) Their bikes cost like a cool Winnebago Ford F350-based motor home (or two) and all those things DO matter for them.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 07:01 UTC
In reply to:

dgumshu: I'm wondering when they will come out with a battery grip or work on the ergonomics.

@Tan68 I've seen selfie sticks with built in USB power banks, if anything... Also, action camera and smartphone gimbals that are, essentially, just advanced selfie sticks for many, can power the device they stabilize. Some heavier gimbals even have a power supply feature pointed out separately, because an extra power supply is sort of a necessity for many Sony mirrorless shooters with those abominably tiny NP-FW50 batteries...

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 06:58 UTC
In reply to:

DotCom Editor: With a teeny tiny lens fronting a teeny tiny sensor on today's smartphones, positioning a graduated filter in the exact optimum spot is likely to be next to impossible. Perhaps the company will add a vernier dial control knob to raise and lower the filter by a microscopic distance for each knob rotation.

Of course, Sunday is April Fool's day. Are we starting just a wee bit early?

They can do just that, adjustment knobs... I'm really serious. Chinese are very attentive to various suggestions and I'm quite sure that there are people from NiSi reading all these comments here, maybe even right now as they are being mocked here. So, even if something seems really weird and not too obvious, Chinese may think “why the hell not?” and implement a seemingly weird feature, that a year later will seem a necessity. How weird can be, for example, a tripod that can be converted into a monopod and has a built-in umbrella? One guy who bought that contraption at a bargain price for the fun of it at an exhibition, told me that that umbrella protected his gear and styled hair of his models not once...

Also, today's smarphone sensors are not as tiny as you imagine, mostly it's 1/2.3", sometimes 1/1.7". May I remind you that the majority of consumer camcorders use 1/6", 1/5" or 1/4" sensors; many “lightweight professional” ones are based on 1/3" 3CCD or 3CMOS. What's tiny then?

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 06:50 UTC
In reply to:

Mssimo: How much for the 15stop ND filter?

Just get a piece of Baader AstroSolar foil (12 stops for Photo and 15 stops for Visual) and slap it over your phone lens...

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 06:33 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: Seriously???

Are there people who will actually buy this thing?

Are there people who will actually stick it on their phone and take snaps with it?

Really???

Yes. I'll be one of them. If you scroll and find one of my other comments here, you'll see why. At least an imaging module in a smartphone will be a bit more useful for me. I'm one of the weirdos who shoot pictures and videos for their Instagram with gear much more capable than a phone and, while graduated ND filters aren't something I use anyhow often on regular cameras (it's, well, sort of easier to do an occasional landscape using HDR and Adobe Camera RAW gradients than to carry a box of filters and mess with them, not to mention that digital post-processing yields better results these days, unless a picture really requires for a polarizer), they can be very useful on some occasions with a smartphone camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 06:31 UTC
In reply to:

michaelp42: I asked them on Facebook if this was an early April fools... Apparently it's for real!

That IS for real, just saw on eBay. They actually manufacture a Cokin/Lee rip-off filter system for regular cameras. That “Chinese Cokin” appeared in 2007, and I know the story from Cokin themselves. I worked at a small photography store 10 years ago for additional income and there was a shortage of very popular Cokin graduated filters. I phoned Cokin HQ in France then and they told me the following: European Commission banned the use of lead-based pigment for their graduated filters, and, while frantically developing the workaround with non-lead pigments that would be as good, they sold their production line and technology to another Chinese manufacturer, TianYa (Shaoxing Shangyu Tianya Photographic Equipment Factory). And if someone produces something in China, be it Chinese manufacturer or a foreign one, it doesn't take long for someone else to start doing the same. And I won't say it's bad because while some companies just stamp clones, others invest into R&D heavily and innovate.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 06:20 UTC
In reply to:

LI: Genius and convenient product ! Just make sure it's compatible with triple camera Huawei P20 pro, life will be much easier !

It isn't ;) the hole in the mount is too small ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 06:05 UTC
In reply to:

NOWHITELENS: I am waiting for the carbon tripod with gimbal head for smart phones !

Well, you just combine a regular Chinese carbon tripod with a Chinese smartphone gimbal (reminding that 3-axis gimbals based on brushless motors are Chinese thing through and through) — bingo, you have it! The only dent in your suggestion is that “gimbal on a tripod” sounds mutually exclusive except for the cases you film or photograph on shaky bridges.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 06:05 UTC

@DPR Staff I don't think I'm really mistaken estimating the glass filter width as 40 mm. I have strongly motivated suspicion that they show it attached to an iPhone 6s at 0:20...0:31 in their video. That's confirmed when they demo the polarizer with a girl at a café, because screen capture footage is pixelated as it should be with non-FullHD 6s capture upscaled to FullHD. Another iPhone they use a bit later (in yellow bumper case) is FullHD, the difference is clearly seen in FullHD YT video, and I'm 99% sure that those are real screen captures because under the circumstances it's just easier to make than to fake. So, iPhone 6/6s is known to be 67 mm wide. Use of Photoshop measure tool and subsequent calculator punching show numbers like 39–40 mm for glass piece width and something like 62.5×43×19 mm dimensions of a holder without a clip but with a ring. Of course that is circumstantial evidence and just a guess, but the margin of error is ±1 mm for the filter and ±2mm for the holder.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 05:58 UTC as 32nd comment
In reply to:

Kerity: Now that's f*tastic! Tourists will really look like pros taking photos with an aïe-phone, a huge tripod, and attach a big lens AND pro-square filters on it. This brilliant innovation should really be given a kick start. Plus, it looks very handy and easy to use.

What's interesting, it's not your average consumer who attaches all that stuff to a phone. It's vloggers who want to squeeze everything from their phones and... some broadcasting professionals. For instance, some news crews do things like Facebook Live when they want to reach to slightly different audience or want to do some live feature but have no slot for that in a schedule (I did like that with François Picard of France 24 English recently, live from the Red Square). It's almost like a proper broadcasting except that the camera is a phone and not a camcorder. It's a regular cameraman who holds it steadier than a consumer, proper microphone connected to smartphone's sound input via an XLR adapter (iRig or SmartRig). Not that we really needed filters like that then, but surely there are situations when they can come in handy. Since smartphones have quite poor dynamic range, I surely can imagine occasions when exactly this filter configuration can come in handy.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 05:16 UTC
On article Russian drone pilot pushes his tiny drone to 33,000ft (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

landscaper1: "still an incredibly reckless and stupid thing to try."

Hey, he's Russian, and these days that seems to be a very Russian thing to do.

What's with that insults? It's not a threat, I like meeting fellow photographers and cameramen when I'm out there, it's always useful to exchange experience. Not sure when I can get abroad, though... By the end of summer, hopefully. And, well, I'm rather Moshe than Ivan in that aspect, although Jews usually don't consider me one of their own.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 20:37 UTC
On article Russian drone pilot pushes his tiny drone to 33,000ft (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

landscaper1: "still an incredibly reckless and stupid thing to try."

Hey, he's Russian, and these days that seems to be a very Russian thing to do.

@mladencoko Nothing is of any consequence. Nothing matters save for wild bees, but if you think closely, wild bees don't matter particularly. I'd wager that if we met out there offline you wouldn't be quite so cocky... Why wouldn't you go out there and snap an umpteenth picture of St. Sava... Oh, I know... I'll pay a visit at Husinskih rudara, 3/11 next time I'm in Belgrade further than Surčin...

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 17:07 UTC
On article Russian drone pilot pushes his tiny drone to 33,000ft (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

landscaper1: "still an incredibly reckless and stupid thing to try."

Hey, he's Russian, and these days that seems to be a very Russian thing to do.

@mladencoko My name is not Igor.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 14:37 UTC
On article Russian drone pilot pushes his tiny drone to 33,000ft (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

landscaper1: "still an incredibly reckless and stupid thing to try."

Hey, he's Russian, and these days that seems to be a very Russian thing to do.

@mladencoko That is a great relief, yet anyway I never noticed any hostility towards myself in Serbia, Croatia or Slovenia. You are a bit mistaken regarding me, because it is not quite possible to be half-a-troll after all these years. Either you self-greenify or you stay sane. Judging by the fact that I'm never noticed even close to the hottest threads that attract that ilk (I'm mum when it's about Ukraine, Syria, spy poisonings, botnets and whatever elections) and am more than reserved when asked on such subjects directly (check Quora, for example), I really do belong to very much endangered species of higher primates eligible to roam free with this or that kind of camera in hand and deliver to news feeds. I guess that had we met in the field, like on Belgrade streets during a rally, we wouldn't be that unkind towards each other. A person who lays down a camera and starts a srač, loses all one's un-ape-ness all too quickly...

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 10:02 UTC
On article Russian drone pilot pushes his tiny drone to 33,000ft (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

landscaper1: "still an incredibly reckless and stupid thing to try."

Hey, he's Russian, and these days that seems to be a very Russian thing to do.

Read that exchange. Reminded me of pavians I witnessed in Warsaw zoo, apes in Shenzhen zoo, mandrils in Stuttgart Wilhelma Garden and chimps in Moscow zoo. Actually, the more people are somewhere, there higher is the probability of some of them doing something stupid. I'd say, the record of the number of morons captured on video belongs to China with it's ≈1.4 billion population and ubiquitous camera phones, but there are very few mainlanders on youtube (they have their own Youku, QQ and Tudou, let alone WeChat, add the language barrier) and what gets to Western traditional and social media is just a tiny speck of what really happens there. Of course, it's hard to beat Russian road recklessness and American raccoons and bears on scavenge missions, but that doesn't deny the fact that this thread reached the new heights (pun intended). What I'm dead sure of, for 23 years of being online, is that my compatriots can trash any online community, so Russian trolling is no joke ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2018 at 09:07 UTC
On article Russian drone pilot pushes his tiny drone to 33,000ft (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

montypieman: The drone guy is free to do pretty much anything he wants in Russia... oh, except run for president.

Actually not. We have very stringent drone legislation... Except that usually it is not really enforced. When you fly a drone somewhere out there, no one cares because there is no one to notice. If you fly a drone during some incident (like recent horrible mall fire in Kemerovo, south-western Siberia, more than 60 casualties, more than 40 kids among them, or when a bus crashed into pedestrian subway last year in Moscow) everyone is too busy to pay attention to a thing like Mavic, Spark or Hubsan X107 that is too small to notice in a havoc. Around Kremlin, in central Moscow, near civilian airports — yes, drones are banned and that is watched after (actually, anti-drone law was passed after a guy was caught with a drone near Kremlin, I interviewed him later). Around private airfields you just have to get an agreement from local flight controller and to not fly over a strip and approaches when there is a traffic there (general aviation in Russia is suppressed, JFYI — blame Matthias Rust).

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2018 at 08:49 UTC
Total: 441, showing: 1 – 20
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