iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Works as a English school coordinator and EFL teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

I was born in João Pessoa, Brazil. I lived in a few other cities in three neighboring states in the northeastern region before moving to where I currently live, about 1,300 miles away down south. Back then, photography was not offered at colleges and universities, and I never got a higher education. I tried to get in the AirForce—they offered the career of aerial photographer (don't know if they still do)—but I could not get in because they detected a health problem. I tried to work with social photographer, and shoot a couple of birthday parties and some portraits, but I wasn't successful. I liked the experience, but I had never been a very social person and the few clients I got had been with the help of my mother.

Soon I was living by myself and in a different city. I was not able to prospect any clients by myself or to get any indication from the few folks I had done some work for. I was just to shy to ask for indications. I had some issues related to lack of perseverance. I was constantly feeling down since my later teenager years. I ended up giving up and working with motorcycle sales, an area in which I was also unsuccessful because it had to be socially more engaged as well, but I thought that it was going to work just because I liked motorcycles. After, I found an opportunity to work at those 1-hour photo labs/shops as a minilab operator. Now I was able to do a better job, probably because I didn't need to have high social skills. I worked isolated most of the time. As a minilab operator, I was considered one of the best at all the places I worked at, thanks to the fact that I loved photography, read a lot of technical literature, and learned how to operate and maintain those machines from very exigent folks. One of them had worked at a Kodak laboratory for more than a decade and opened a photo lab along with two other business partners, and it was the first photo lab I worked at. The other one was a Noritsu consultant/technitian.

I started to get socially more engaged after I got involved with the church of Christ. If I was as socially engaged as I was after 2 or 3 years attending church and doing volunteering work when I started shooting, the story would have been different. Since I got involved with church, I have been often in contact with Americans and my English improved considerably.
It was because of that that I had my first opportunity to teach English, helping some classmates at a course I was attending in which English was required. My classmates noticed that I liked teaching and taught well and encouraged me to be a teacher.

After about six years working as a teacher at at least four schools, I got the opportunity to have my own business, an English school franchise focused on private classes at homes and businesses. This opportunity was given me by the current company I had been working as a teacher for two and a half years, but only if I moved to a pretty far city, where I live now.

The first camera I have ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF. I used to disassemble and assemble it. The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was in the 80's. The husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-letter-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided into many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries in them. One was about people, the other was about women, another one, about nature, and one about architecture. I loved that kit. Later on, when I was able to understand some English, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

In 1993, I was living in a city called Natal, RN. I was riding my bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at that!" I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mm and cm, and pounds and ounces to kgs, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, camera and lens guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, PB, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I got to know the folks there because they didn't have access that kind of magazines and I used to go there and take mine and talk about photography, and we enjoyed that a lot and we became friends. While I was working there, I had the chance to handle some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3, FM2, Minolta Maxxum 9xi, and some others from Pentax. Canon was rare.

Comments

Total: 247, showing: 61 – 80
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On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (710 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

@cosinaphile, a Chinese brand is different from an American brand made in China. It's even different from a Chinese brand that is controlled by another country's brand. I have a problem with Chinese brands that don't pay at least more than 50% in royalties over technologies to non-pro-communism/socialism countries. It may seem silly, but that's a real issue for me.

Based on that, I should not be really worried about this camera, because it seems to me they are probably using a lot of components and technologies that either come from non-pro-communism/socialism countries, are manufactured by from non-pro-communism/socialism countries' companies located in China, or are manufactured by Chinese companies under lisence from non-pro-communism/socialism contries' companies.

I don't really know if that's the case. I hope it is.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 11:51 UTC
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (710 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

@great Javier, I understand your point now. It makes sense.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 11:41 UTC
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (710 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

Safer buy? What do you mean by that?

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 21:32 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I've seen some nice line of cameras ending with great final products and leaving people like "Aaaah..." and "What? Nooo!" This one seems more like that is the case. I so no point for a SLT camera anymore. Sony has gone too far with mirrorless already. This may be part of the investment plan of the A system, which do not include only leaving owners of the A system accessories orphan when they ended camera developments, but also owners of Zeiss lenses. Maybe, there's nothing to do, but the fact is that I've seen nice lines end bossy like that.

I was not aware of that. I missed that detail. Thank you.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 20:48 UTC

I've seen some nice line of cameras ending with great final products and leaving people like "Aaaah..." and "What? Nooo!" This one seems more like that is the case. I so no point for a SLT camera anymore. Sony has gone too far with mirrorless already. This may be part of the investment plan of the A system, which do not include only leaving owners of the A system accessories orphan when they ended camera developments, but also owners of Zeiss lenses. Maybe, there's nothing to do, but the fact is that I've seen nice lines end bossy like that.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 16:08 UTC as 107th comment | 2 replies
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (710 comments in total)

Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 15:57 UTC as 212th comment | 8 replies

"I like that the lens has a bit more reach than the FZ1000, but the way it's always-extended feels a bit awkward, though I understand why Panasonic is doing it."

Why is Panasonic doing it? I am not sure if I understand that. Is it that external parts moving make the camera more expensive to produce and doesn't allow for a lighter and silent zooming? I think those are the or some of the reasons.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 11:55 UTC as 140th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

keepreal: There must be a lot of idiots out there. Otherwise we would not see lenses from Cooke and other manufacturers as such ridiculous prices. I am sure they are nowhere near worth anything, even a lot less than the asking prices.

I would be a lot happier if people with more money than they know what to do with gave it to help those in the poverty trap get educated and motivated to better themselves. Some do of the own accord, but not that many can see how. The divide between the rich and poor has widened since the 2008 credit crunch, the wealthy mostly escaped the consequences but the mostly innocent less well off have faced the brunt of it.

If I thought there would be any chance of success, I'd like to see a worldwide boycott of Cooke, Meyer and other manufacturers behaving like this - not just in optics or photography, by the way.

What is this? A socialist photographer? Crazy comment.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2016 at 11:33 UTC
On article Tamron files patent for 115mm F1.4 VC lens (61 comments in total)

What do they mean by positive and negative positive? Is that because the front and rear elements/groups are positive and the intermediate ones negative?, or the front and rear groups (G1 and G3b) are positive and the intermediate ones (G2 and G3a) are negative?, or something else?

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 02:07 UTC as 2nd comment

Kodak Instamatic 144X. Kidding. The Olympus looks very well build side-by-side with the Sony, and it was a dream for me when it was marketed, but never had one, and it's been quite a while since I saw it the last time and it still looks great. And I saw the pictures you took with it and, man, film color rendition and dynamic range are still unique. Don't know if better, bus certainly very special, and practically unmatchable. Thanks!

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2016 at 23:55 UTC as 29th comment

Very nice! This is an amusement park! One criticism: I like black and white photos and videos, but I think this video should have been filmed in color.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2016 at 23:40 UTC as 29th comment
On article Meyer-Optik Goerlitz launches 3-element 95mm F2.6 (124 comments in total)

I am very curious to see what they've acheived with a three-element design.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 12:38 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Under pressure: Canon vs. Nikon in a hydraulic press (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

felix from the suburbs: Kind of a silly stunt. If the cameras still work, why destroy them? Can they not be donated to some school program or at least sold to a collector. I have some old film cameras that I only use rarely to shoot a few rolls of slide film, but I would never destroy them for the sake of being funny.

Ah, come on, man. Not a big deal destroying things that we can find plenty. It's not like those guys are chasing all the AE-1s and FAs in the world to make extinct.

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2016 at 02:49 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (473 comments in total)

I wouldn't buy at camera at that level without learning the most I could about it, especially the functions I would use frequently, but it makes sense me to think that a new camera shouldn't come with a feature implemented in an earlier form compared to previous cameras, especially coming with a similar item description. I think Nikon was mean here.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 02:40 UTC as 131st comment
In reply to:

Thomas Traub: I don't need a disassambly-guide!
I need a re-assambly-guide!
;-)

If there ever is an assembly kit, it will not be for everyone. Just like those miniature replica assembly kits. I don't think everybody who buys them assemble them successfully. Once properly warned how to do it, it should not be the company's problem. Buy it who likes it and wants to take the risk. There will always be the unsuccessful ones, and that's all, and the unsuccessful ones that will want to sue the company for their inability.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2016 at 15:52 UTC
In reply to:

Thomas Traub: I don't need a disassambly-guide!
I need a re-assambly-guide!
;-)

@justmeMN I definitely like the idea of unassembled kits. It would be fun! It would make owners feel something even more special about their cameras by finishing assembling them themselves. Like participating in the end process of bringing the camera to life.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2016 at 03:23 UTC
On article The Canon that can: Canon EOS 80D Review (729 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alexdi: How is it the best camera site is saddled with the worst audience? It's just a constant stream of negativity and complaining. No appreciation for the article, none for the product, and not five thoughtful comments in fifty. If you're all this unpleasant IRL, I wouldn't want to spend a moment with any of you.

That's one of the reasons why there is the button 'Like' and the options 'most popular,' 'only recommended' and 'only DPR staff.' The popularity and/or status/category of a comment is a natural selection. I barely read more than the first 5 to 10 comments before sorting them out.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2016 at 14:50 UTC

Nice quality, nice design, ordinary-Chinese building quality, Japanese-level price. It seems they are making a good profit out of the X30, and pleased both consumers and their financial department a lot. Quite a feat.

Note: It was posted twice because my internet connection failed temporarily and I thought it wasn't sent. I'm sorry.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2016 at 14:37 UTC as 3rd comment

Nice quality, nice design, ordinary-Chinese building quality, Japanese-level price. It seems they are making a good profit out of the X30, and pleased both consumers and their financial department a lot. Quite a feat.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2016 at 14:25 UTC as 4th comment
On article Beta: try out our new 'light' color scheme (722 comments in total)

Sometimes, simple changes make a lot of difference. I like the black version very much, but when there is much ambient light, the white version looks to me equally nice. Thank you.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2016 at 21:59 UTC as 524th comment
Total: 247, showing: 61 – 80
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