iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Works as a English school coordinator and EFL teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

I was born in João Pessoa, Brazil. I lived in a few other cities in three neighboring states in the northeastern region before moving to where I currently live, about 1,300 miles away down south. Back then, photography was not offered at colleges and universities, and I never got a higher education. I tried to get in the AirForce—they offered the career of aerial photographer (don't know if they still do)—but I could not get in because they detected a health problem. I tried to work with social photographer, and shoot a couple of birthday parties and some portraits, but I wasn't successful. I liked the experience, but I had never been a very social person and the few clients I got had been with the help of my mother.

Soon I was living by myself and in a different city. I was not able to prospect any clients by myself or to get any indication from the few folks I had done some work for. I was just to shy to ask for indications. I had some issues related to lack of perseverance. I was constantly feeling down since my later teenager years. I ended up giving up and working with motorcycle sales, an area in which I was also unsuccessful because it had to be socially more engaged as well, but I thought that it was going to work just because I liked motorcycles. After, I found an opportunity to work at those 1-hour photo labs/shops as a minilab operator. Now I was able to do a better job, probably because I didn't need to have high social skills. I worked isolated most of the time. As a minilab operator, I was considered one of the best at all the places I worked at, thanks to the fact that I loved photography, read a lot of technical literature, and learned how to operate and maintain those machines from very exigent folks. One of them had worked at a Kodak laboratory for more than a decade and opened a photo lab along with two other business partners, and it was the first photo lab I worked at. The other one was a Noritsu consultant/technitian.

I started to get socially more engaged after I got involved with the church of Christ. If I was as socially engaged as I was after 2 or 3 years attending church and doing volunteering work when I started shooting, the story would have been different. Since I got involved with church, I have been often in contact with Americans and my English improved considerably.
It was because of that that I had my first opportunity to teach English, helping some classmates at a course I was attending in which English was required. My classmates noticed that I liked teaching and taught well and encouraged me to be a teacher.

After about six years working as a teacher at at least four schools, I got the opportunity to have my own business, an English school franchise focused on private classes at homes and businesses. This opportunity was given me by the current company I had been working as a teacher for two and a half years, but only if I moved to a pretty far city, where I live now.

The first camera I have ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF. I used to disassemble and assemble it. The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was in the 80's. The husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-letter-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided into many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries in them. One was about people, the other was about women, another one, about nature, and one about architecture. I loved that kit. Later on, when I was able to understand some English, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

In 1993, I was living in a city called Natal, RN. I was riding my bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at that!" I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mm and cm, and pounds and ounces to kgs, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, camera and lens guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, PB, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I got to know the folks there because they didn't have access that kind of magazines and I used to go there and take mine and talk about photography, and we enjoyed that a lot and we became friends. While I was working there, I had the chance to handle some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3, FM2, Minolta Maxxum 9xi, and some others from Pentax. Canon was rare.

Comments

Total: 252, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

iae aa eia: Bright super/ultra wideangle lenses for small sensors (4/3's half way there) makes little sense. If it were, for example, ƒ/3.4-4.8, the designed could be simplified a little, amd/or the number of elements could be decreased, and the price would be lower, the quality would remain, and nothing would be missed in terms bokeh, since it makes little effect and is rarely useful in this kind of lens.

With every other new camera, high ISO values get less and less noisy, counterbalancing the issue of the smaller aperture. Putting aside other features and quality factors unrelated to the optics, and even bulkiness (which helps giving this lens its professional appeal), there's no reason to choose it in place of the 9-18. Perhaps you just can't make a 9-18 with such a small aperture range look and feel professional enough with those small and few elements.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 02:31 UTC

Bright super/ultra wideangle lenses for small sensors (4/3's half way there) makes little sense. If it were, for example, ƒ/3.4-4.8, the designed could be simplified a little, amd/or the number of elements could be decreased, and the price would be lower, the quality would remain, and nothing would be missed in terms bokeh, since it makes little effect and is rarely useful in this kind of lens.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 02:41 UTC as 6th comment | 3 replies
On article Light's L16 camera is in final stages of testing (305 comments in total)
In reply to:

Triplet Perar: I have made a design for a three lens camera, 28, 50, 75, but this is truly crazy. Although, I can recognise great potential. What is required in this, though, is the superior lens design, adequate sensors and image processor. Otherwise, it is not worth it; one great zoom can beat this if the those three lack in any department.

If the practical resolution and noise is anywhere above 50% close to that of an average entry-level DSLR and the price is around the same, it'll be worth it. A regular zoom would only beat it (considering its design purposes) if it came with an at least 1" sensor and the zoom lens were also folded.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2017 at 05:06 UTC
On article Light's L16 camera is in final stages of testing (305 comments in total)

I think it will not be a good choice for close selfies in low light environments. The doubt of to which lens to look at will likely result in blurred irises and pupils.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2017 at 04:36 UTC as 43rd comment
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (540 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: "The camera's shutter is rated for 150k shots and now features a shutter monitor, which automatically adjust shutter speeds to keep them accurate."

Yeah, I think I heard and read about many people complaining about imprecise shutters in recent years, and adding a monitor is really awesome. Also, 150k? My jaw dropped on the floor and I can't put it back.

Oh man, my jaw had just been screwed back onto place before you said that.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 02:21 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (540 comments in total)

"The camera's shutter is rated for 150k shots and now features a shutter monitor, which automatically adjust shutter speeds to keep them accurate."

Yeah, I think I heard and read about many people complaining about imprecise shutters in recent years, and adding a monitor is really awesome. Also, 150k? My jaw dropped on the floor and I can't put it back.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 13:56 UTC as 81st comment | 2 replies
On article Sigma sd Quattro H real world samples gallery (108 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: The color depth Foveons produce is unparallel. Sigma has proved it time and again. No camera beats it. Multilayered sensors to the masses NOW!

Yeah, perhaps color space is more appropriate to say. You feel like the image is more real, the colors more penetrating. I don't know, it's something very different that reminds me of film. Everything looks more real. It beats any other camera either for portrairts or anything else. I worked as a minilab operator for a few years and was trained by Kodak and Noritsu folks, and, well, in my opinion, nothing beats it.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 16:02 UTC
On article Sigma sd Quattro H real world samples gallery (108 comments in total)

The color depth Foveons produce is unparallel. Sigma has proved it time and again. No camera beats it. Multilayered sensors to the masses NOW!

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 04:14 UTC as 13th comment | 4 replies
On article Hasselblad X1D-50c First Impressions Review (316 comments in total)

I don't understand why it is difficult to talk about color. Ok, the X1D doesn't output JPEG, but something can be said about the samples in RAW. It looks to me they render colors basically in the same tonality, only that the X1D is more saturated.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 00:49 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply

This gray finish looks (at least in the pictures) very nice. I think Nikon could have it as their standard color finish.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2017 at 04:19 UTC as 12th comment | 4 replies

I had one. I liked it very much. I also had the original super wide-angle lens adapter. It was the last camera I had. I went to the beach and left it on top of a reef while I took a bath, not going farther than 20 feet away from where the camera was. The reef was about 10 feet wide, and the camera was on the opposite side from where the waves hit, and they were not strong, but there was one a little stronger, stronger enough for some salt water to fall on the camera, which was in a little hole, and it became full of water, and the camera partially sumerged. Such a dumb idea to put it there. I felt like I had a followed one of the tips from a Dumb 101 guide.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 15:49 UTC as 33rd comment
In reply to:

martuyn: maybe the rest of the world should ban everything form the US.

There are a lot of countries that have banned almost everything from the US. They are very nice countries. People live on farms, 100% diverse people, no homeless, women and gays respected, children well taken care and well educated, they have cameras for free, etc. Google up for countries that have banned American things the most. You're gonna love them. You're gonna want to go live there.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 23:53 UTC

Good job, Trump! Don't trust Muslims. The ones that are not carrying jihadist attacks, say nothing, do no protest against jihadists, but only against islamophobia. They are dissimulating and dissimulation is sanctioned in Islam (Taqiya). Muslims, Islam, are not welcome in America. Make it clear and loud!

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 23:47 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

tkbslc: Would be grand if they would willingly lower their profits a few percent and improve working conditions in their factories.

It's not as simple as you think. They can't tell how everything is supposed to work in another country, especially one like China. I'm not saying that they are totally exempt of the responsibility, but just saying that good part of the problem is related to the own nation and/or government of a country.

I'm gonna use a light parallel, but that says something. Chevrolet, FIAT, Ford, and VW, for example, sell their worse cars in Brazil, and more expensive than in a country where Brazil exported to. Why do you think that is so? Many people here think car makers are greedy and stuff. No! Why do they sell better cars in other countries?

A company, to make sure they survive in a country, has to dance according to the music to a certain extent. Only the fact it is Apple can help. It help turn Chinese people's eyes to America, and the ones fortunate to have access to see how things work in America will see the differences and eventually demand and get changes to happen over time.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 03:39 UTC
On article Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half (89 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Thanks for the cuts-in-half! Wow, man, more than 30 elements in that Canon 200-400?! That's a lot for a telezoom. About the Sony 99, that optical housing where a pentaprism was once located is the autofocus module, I believe. They could have lowered the top of the camera to take away some of that emptiness. Maybe they didn't do that for design purposes?, as it could make the camera look quite different from its predecessor?

Built-in flash? Where? And tell Sony where it is. Yeah, they could have made it even more compact. It didn't pass me a good impression seeing that amount of empty space atop.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2017 at 04:45 UTC
On article Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half (89 comments in total)

Thanks for the cuts-in-half! Wow, man, more than 30 elements in that Canon 200-400?! That's a lot for a telezoom. About the Sony 99, that optical housing where a pentaprism was once located is the autofocus module, I believe. They could have lowered the top of the camera to take away some of that emptiness. Maybe they didn't do that for design purposes?, as it could make the camera look quite different from its predecessor?

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2017 at 02:39 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies

Well, it really seems Nikon is gonna have a tough 100th anniversary celebration. I am very sorry for the company and its costumers and/or fans. Congrats for the sarcasm in the article. Unfortunately, it was deserved. By the way, I think some lens makers could offer cut-in-half lenses for collection. I would suggest to cut the lenses too so that you can see their shape. With a set of lenses they can make two kits, and the interior lenses could be without any special treatments and not made to the standard expected for the lenses in a real product, but only the front and rear elements would. The half of the lens body could be a mock-up of the original, and there could be a minipedestal so that we could put in standing, like those miniature planes. My guess is that it would cost considerably less than the real product, perhaps 1/10, and I would definitely buy one or more.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 15:13 UTC as 68th comment | 1 reply

This kind of display is still not pleasing enough. Too much space between each one of them, but I understand why. The drones have to be small ones. The smaller the better, because they can fly closer to each other and move faster, making small moves quicker and standing still more steadily. Well, I think.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 14:56 UTC as 33rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

iae aa eia: The 35mm would be better (would make more sense [to me]) if it were a 31 or 32mm, and the 40 were a 43.

Although I like Pentax, I'm not. I have no camera at the moment. 43.2mm is the standard focal length for FF, and that's why I said that. Pentax just happens to hit it when they launched a 43mm. Ok then, let me have myself satisfied with the 40mm, just as there are lots of 50mm, which is 7mm away from the standard FL but are sold as standards. Why then, a 35mm? Just 5mm difference to the 40?

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 19:30 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: The DoF this sensor size produces is just perfect. Looks better than FF. IMO, it's definitely setting a new standard.

@Revenant @MrBrightSide Well, sometimes we have to write in extreme details so that some folks like you two understand.

When I say the sensor produces, I mean it allows to be produced. Another thing. Although you can get a similar DoF with a brighter lens in the FF format, a more even center and corner bokeh is achieved with a smaller aperture, and this is the reason why a standard 2.8 lens produces a better bokeh than a, let's say, 1.4 in a smaller sensor. Look for examples and you'll easily see that.

Shots taken with this Fuji standard lens full opened produces much less vignetting and much more even bokeh from corner to corner. Now try to step a FF standard FL lens to 2.8 and take a picture. You get the eveness in terms of vignetting nullification, but definitely not the same charming DoF of the medium format.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 16:48 UTC
Total: 252, showing: 21 – 40
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