iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Works as a English school coordinator and EFL teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

I was born in Brazil, in a city called João Pessoa. I lived in a few other cities in three neighboring states before moving to where I currently live, about 1,300 miles away down south, Belo Horizonte. Back then, photography was not offered at colleges and universities, I didn't want any other courses, and I never got a higher education. I tried to get in the AirForce—they offered the career of aerial photographer (don't know if they still do)—but I could not get in because they detected a health problem. I started working with social photography. I shot a couple of birthday parties and some portraits, but I wasn't successful. I liked the experience, but I had never been a very social person and the few clients I had I got with the help of my mother.

During this time, I was living by myself and in a different city, and I was not able to prospect any clients by myself or get any references from the few folks I had done work for. I was just to shy to ask for references. I had some issues related to lack of perseverance. I was constantly feeling down since my later teenager years. I ended up giving up and working with motorcycle sales, an area in which I was also unsuccessful because I had to be socially more engaged as well, but I thought that it was going to work just because I liked motorcycles. After a while, I got an opportunity to work at those 1-hour photo labs/shops as a minilab operator. Now I was able to do a better job, probably because I didn't have to have high social skills. I worked isolated most of the time. As a minilab operator, I was considered one of the best at all the places I worked at, thanks to the fact that I loved photography, read a lot of technical literature, and learned with two very good folks how to operate and maintain those machines. One of them had worked at a Kodak laboratory for more than a decade and had opened a photo lab along with two other business partners, the first photo lab I worked at. The other guy was a Noritsu consultant/technitian.

I started getting socially more engaged after I got involved with the church of Christ. If I was as socially engaged as I was after 2 or 3 years attending church and doing volunteering work when I started shooting, the story would have been different. Since I got involved with church, I have been often in contact with Americans and my English improved considerably. It was because of that that I had my first opportunity to teach English, helping some classmates at a course I was attending in which to have English was a very important requirement. My classmates noticed that I liked teaching and that I taught well, and they encouraged me to be an English teacher.

After about six years working at at least four English schools, I got the opportunity to have my own business, which is as a master franchisee for an English school specialized in private classes. This opportunity was offered to me by the same company I had been working for two and a half years as an EFL teacher, but only if I moved to a pretty far away city, which is where I live now. I had terrible headaches when I lived in my previous hometown, but my current hometown is cooler and drier, and it's also better for business, a little more developed, the fried and cooked food is amazing (except baked stuff, nothing special), and the accent is among the nicest in Brazil.

INITIAL INTEREST IN PHOTOGRAPHY
The first camera I've ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF, in the 80's; I used to disassemble and assemble it quite often. The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was still in the 80's, when the husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-letter-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided into many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries in these. One was about people, the other was about women, another one about nature, and one about architecture. I loved that kit. Decades later, already late 2000's, when I was able to understand English much better, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

In 1993, I was living in a city called Natal. I was riding a bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines, as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at that!" (in Portuguese, of course). I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mili/centimeters, and pounds and ounces to (kilo)grams, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese)—well, I started doing currency conversion from 1996 onward, as there was no 'real' in 1993, but only a temporary, transitional currency in 1994, and I was still not interested in currency conversions by 1995). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, gear guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

FIRST JOB IN PHOTOGRAPHY
In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, a small city in the countryside of the State of Paraíba, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I knew the folks there because they didn't have access to that kind of magazines and I used to go there to show them to them and talk about photography, and we enjoyed doing that and became friends.

While I was working there, I had the chance to handle and use some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3 and FM2, the Minolta Maxxum 9xi and X-370, and quite a large variety of Pentaxes, like the K2000, ME, and P30t; There were other cameras from same said brands and other brands, like Vivitar and Yashica. Canons were rare and I don't know why. I can't remember ever seeing one, except compacts. But, two brands I wanted so much to have an opportunity to see live were Contax, Ricoh, and Zeiss. I just drooled over seeing pictures of Contax bodies and Zeiss lenses. Even one or two of Contax compacts. I also wish I had seen more Olympus SLR's. I also drooled over its µ-II.

I'M GONNA ADD MORE LATER.

Comments

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On article Kodak shows off Super 8 camera in first sample reel (218 comments in total)

Er...

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 01:43 UTC as 71st comment

Only an ignorant person (Dems, in general) thinks that the Chinese deserve a high level of trust. China is a communist country. More than one person that I know and goes to China now and then, some of them to buy things for resale, told me that the country is closed compared even to Brazil. People don't have free access to any website as we do (even in Brazil). Things are very very different there. Just spend a little time, pay attention, and you start seeing and noticing. But remember that you rarely have access to what that country is on average, but only the most common regions for foreigners.

If Hillary had won and there were more Dems in the house, I'm not sure this was happening, which would be very unfortunate. And for people who say that they're spied by US agencies, believe me, it's less difficult to fight one of those home agencies and than Chinese ones. People are very misled thinking that Chinese companies have the level of freedom from gov't as Americans do.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 01:37 UTC as 44th comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

rfsIII: "At Apple, our customers’ trust means everything to us" is a hilarious statement. When was the last time anyone trusted Apple? When they told us that they didn't use child labor? When they said Chinese employees committing suicide wasn't their fault? When they refused to pay for iPhone and iPad repairs even though they knew their faulty Liquid Contact Indicators were serving up false positives? When they told us that our iPhone antennas didn't work because we were holding them wrong?
The sooner Apple goes out of business, the better.

@Xentinus:
Q: When was the last time anyone trusted Apple?
A: I use Windows and Android, but I have an iPad for 2 1/5 years. I don't plan to switch to Apple, but it's the most durable and reliable computer device I have ever used. So, yes, you can trust Apple. Totally trustable? What company is?
Q: When they told us that they didn't use child labor?
A: This is a hidden-from-the-world reality. I think that some Chinese had children working there (not very directly) without clear knowledge from Apple. It's totally possible to have happened at some point. You think China is that open and clear about their practices and you get there ruling, huh? Some textile companies have holed chairs so employees don't have to go to the bathroom;
Q: When they said Chinese employees committing suicide wasn't their fault?
A: Go learn more about suicide there, man.

"The sooner Apple goes out of business, the better." A serious person doesn't go that far to wish that to a company like Apple.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2017 at 13:21 UTC
In reply to:

rfsIII: "At Apple, our customers’ trust means everything to us" is a hilarious statement. When was the last time anyone trusted Apple? When they told us that they didn't use child labor? When they said Chinese employees committing suicide wasn't their fault? When they refused to pay for iPhone and iPad repairs even though they knew their faulty Liquid Contact Indicators were serving up false positives? When they told us that our iPhone antennas didn't work because we were holding them wrong?
The sooner Apple goes out of business, the better.

How come that comment got more than 50 likes?

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2017 at 00:28 UTC

I always thought that there was a problem in that. First time I noticed that was when my father gave a trip to Bahia to two of my sisters, to which they took a camera with a flipping screen back in 2008, when taking a selfie was still not a pandemic thing. My father, very anxious to see the photos, got very very upset, as more than two thirds of the photos were selfies, and since there was no selfie stick nor the wide-angle lens was that wide (equivalent to 35mm, I think), the photos barely showed much background and we barely saw anything could tell one was in Bahia. I remember my father feeling frustrated and saying, "Nobody will believe you two went to Bahia."

And around 2013, I met a guy that behaved like he was a very well put together person, but when he was away and I was on Facebook, I'd suddenly see a photo session of him, a collage of 9 photos of his face just moving his head a little and pulling a Don Juan look and beak.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2017 at 00:25 UTC as 40th comment
In reply to:

GreatOceanSoftware: I have non-selfitis. I take a ton of photos of things other than me.

Taking photos of other things seems normal to me, but a ton of photos of other things is also a problem, called nevermetisitis.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2017 at 00:06 UTC
On article Season's Greetings from DPReview.com (85 comments in total)

'Feliz Natal atrasado' (Belated Merry Christmas) from Brazil to all at DPReview!

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 10:48 UTC as 13th comment
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I think that the police officer failed terribly, but to take this case to try to make a case for banning guns and categorizing all the law enforcement badly is very stupid. Some people are good people, but p*** in their pants when they see a gun, and some people are good people but don't p*** in their pants when they see a gun, but they can grab it and use it. Which good people is more helpful when terror arrises and police can't be there quickly? If you don't like guns, don't buy them. We don't want you to be forced to buy one. And I would rather have the gov't and the people back me up when I kill a criminal with a 100 bullets, than having to use a club and fight fist to fist. Americans don't want police wasting time and resources struggling with thugs, but solving the problem quickly. Thank God Americans care zero to what European sissies think, and now they have a president that reflects this value better. Again, the officer failed miserably and should pay a high price for that.

Right. My bad.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2017 at 15:07 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I think that the police officer failed terribly, but to take this case to try to make a case for banning guns and categorizing all the law enforcement badly is very stupid. Some people are good people, but p*** in their pants when they see a gun, and some people are good people but don't p*** in their pants when they see a gun, but they can grab it and use it. Which good people is more helpful when terror arrises and police can't be there quickly? If you don't like guns, don't buy them. We don't want you to be forced to buy one. And I would rather have the gov't and the people back me up when I kill a criminal with a 100 bullets, than having to use a club and fight fist to fist. Americans don't want police wasting time and resources struggling with thugs, but solving the problem quickly. Thank God Americans care zero to what European sissies think, and now they have a president that reflects this value better. Again, the officer failed miserably and should pay a high price for that.

The diversity in the USA doesn't compare with the diversity in countries in Europe. It's more difficult to find consensus and peace in such an environment and that's why a more limited gov't and people with more independence are better. If being a sissy, letting the gov't babysit you, and philosophying with thugs work well in Europe, then congrats!, but it doesn't work well in the US. Another thing that makes it different is how America was built. People have more space and are less dependent on public transport, and this makes people feel more they own something bigger and have to take care of it. Housing is more compact in Europe, and more people living in buildings and in dense areas and commuting in masses make them behave in a more progressive way. The US give more opportunities than any other countries, help more with charity, have the best market, etc. I'm afraid to say Americans never left Europe thinking about building another Europe in this continent.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2017 at 02:05 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I think that the police officer failed terribly, but to take this case to try to make a case for banning guns and categorizing all the law enforcement badly is very stupid. Some people are good people, but p*** in their pants when they see a gun, and some people are good people but don't p*** in their pants when they see a gun, but they can grab it and use it. Which good people is more helpful when terror arrises and police can't be there quickly? If you don't like guns, don't buy them. We don't want you to be forced to buy one. And I would rather have the gov't and the people back me up when I kill a criminal with a 100 bullets, than having to use a club and fight fist to fist. Americans don't want police wasting time and resources struggling with thugs, but solving the problem quickly. Thank God Americans care zero to what European sissies think, and now they have a president that reflects this value better. Again, the officer failed miserably and should pay a high price for that.

@De Fotoman, if being scared is what drives them to quickly paralize a thug with a helicopter, 10 men jumping on him or making 100 perfurations, then fine. I've watched some videos of conflicts between the police and criminals in Europe and it's ridiculous. If you European are proud of wasting time philosophizing with criminals, kudos to you!

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2017 at 23:00 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I think that the police officer failed terribly, but to take this case to try to make a case for banning guns and categorizing all the law enforcement badly is very stupid. Some people are good people, but p*** in their pants when they see a gun, and some people are good people but don't p*** in their pants when they see a gun, but they can grab it and use it. Which good people is more helpful when terror arrises and police can't be there quickly? If you don't like guns, don't buy them. We don't want you to be forced to buy one. And I would rather have the gov't and the people back me up when I kill a criminal with a 100 bullets, than having to use a club and fight fist to fist. Americans don't want police wasting time and resources struggling with thugs, but solving the problem quickly. Thank God Americans care zero to what European sissies think, and now they have a president that reflects this value better. Again, the officer failed miserably and should pay a high price for that.

Weerterbos, you need a little help here. 30% own a gun, and out of the 69% that don't own a gun, 36% "Could see owning a gun in the future." So, 33% don't own and don't want to own.

It's worth saying that a large amount of people that own a gun either are not interviewed or prefer not to say they have one. At least two Americans told me that, especially during the Obama administration, when the gov't was publicly pushing for high gun control (and a ban, eventually), many of their friends avoid exposing their lives regarding guns.

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2017 at 22:49 UTC

I think that the police officer failed terribly, but to take this case to try to make a case for banning guns and categorizing all the law enforcement badly is very stupid. Some people are good people, but p*** in their pants when they see a gun, and some people are good people but don't p*** in their pants when they see a gun, but they can grab it and use it. Which good people is more helpful when terror arrises and police can't be there quickly? If you don't like guns, don't buy them. We don't want you to be forced to buy one. And I would rather have the gov't and the people back me up when I kill a criminal with a 100 bullets, than having to use a club and fight fist to fist. Americans don't want police wasting time and resources struggling with thugs, but solving the problem quickly. Thank God Americans care zero to what European sissies think, and now they have a president that reflects this value better. Again, the officer failed miserably and should pay a high price for that.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 00:51 UTC as 18th comment | 11 replies
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Here it goes again. A company grows big and starts to do more than it is supposed to do, and thus, because of the crime of a few, most users will have to be annoyed. What's next? After you have made several searches for animals, a new message saying "We've noticed that you have searched for animals a lot lately despite of our warnings. What are your intentions?"

@Dante Birchen Before you go and we never see you again, answer my first question. What does Trump have to do with this?

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2017 at 01:50 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Here it goes again. A company grows big and starts to do more than it is supposed to do, and thus, because of the crime of a few, most users will have to be annoyed. What's next? After you have made several searches for animals, a new message saying "We've noticed that you have searched for animals a lot lately despite of our warnings. What are your intentions?"

@Dante Birchen Well, move to a more socialist country and live there making twice as much as the average citizen for 2 years and than 3 more years making just the average, and you will change your mind about Trump. One suggestion: Brazil. The aveage salary here is about 1900 reais (575 dollars as of today, but things costing 2 to 10 times more, and you don't have access to 10% of what's available in the States). 02 years making 3800 reais and 03 more years making 1900. You have to start from zero here. Don't bring or use any money you already have. Do that, man, and you'll learn a good lesson. And don't bring your gear. As I said, start from scratch. Buy a new camera (and everything else, including clothes) here with the money made here.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 15:59 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Here it goes again. A company grows big and starts to do more than it is supposed to do, and thus, because of the crime of a few, most users will have to be annoyed. What's next? After you have made several searches for animals, a new message saying "We've noticed that you have searched for animals a lot lately despite of our warnings. What are your intentions?"

@Dante Birchen Haha! What does Trump have to do with this, man? I don't agree with you. This is what makes the world boring and confusing. You can look at people in two different ways: trustworthy or untrustworthy. You can either consider a person innocent until proven guilty or guilty until proven innocent. When you do this kind of thing, you are taking a step toward assuming that the person reading the warning is somehow under watch or can be under watch.

If it showed the results and the warning, for example, in discreet letters at the bottom of the screen, then it was going to be ok. If someone is doing something wrong, they will eventually be denounced. This all-politically-correct attitude is a double-standard attitude typical of leftists. When you stop to see things closely, you see how this social justice warrior behavior is faulty.

That's why Trump won, by the way. Because of the left's hypocrisy. He's a president for people that are driven by facts, not feelings.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 00:53 UTC

Here it goes again. A company grows big and starts to do more than it is supposed to do, and thus, because of the crime of a few, most users will have to be annoyed. What's next? After you have made several searches for animals, a new message saying "We've noticed that you have searched for animals a lot lately despite of our warnings. What are your intentions?"

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 23:26 UTC as 7th comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

ovlov: This is the Trump of the camera gear world. This is the camera that will Make Photography Great Again!

I'm tired of winning... Not.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 23:16 UTC
In reply to:

ovlov: This is the Trump of the camera gear world. This is the camera that will Make Photography Great Again!

And who and what is WhoeverYouVotedForOrWishedHaveWon in the camera gear world? And what gear would that person represent? I'm curious.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2017 at 00:52 UTC

Really? They sure are good photos, but I'm sad that there's nothing worth a prize from our truly beautiful capitalistic world with our outstanding views and constructions and amazing Western people. Even Western people sad and crying may look better. No offense.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 23:40 UTC as 6th comment

It's very difficult for a company to survive in Brazil, and Nikon has not had a good strategy in this country. So, it seems to me to be a smart decision.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2017 at 01:14 UTC as 106th comment | 1 reply
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