iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Works as a English school coordinator and EFL teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

I was born in Brazil, in a city called João Pessoa. I lived in a few other cities in three neighboring states before moving to where I currently live, about 1,300 miles away down south, Belo Horizonte. Back then, photography was not offered at colleges and universities, I didn't want any other courses, and I never got a higher education. I tried to get in the AirForce—they offered the career of aerial photographer (don't know if they still do)—but I could not get in because they detected a health problem. I started working with social photography. I shot a couple of birthday parties and some portraits, but I wasn't successful. I liked the experience, but I had never been a very social person and the few clients I had I got with the help of my mother.

During this time, I was living by myself and in a different city, and I was not able to prospect any clients by myself or get any references from the few folks I had done work for. I was just to shy to ask for references. I had some issues related to lack of perseverance. I was constantly feeling down since my later teenager years. I ended up giving up and working with motorcycle sales, an area in which I was also unsuccessful because I had to be socially more engaged as well, but I thought that it was going to work just because I liked motorcycles. After a while, I got an opportunity to work at those 1-hour photo labs/shops as a minilab operator. Now I was able to do a better job, probably because I didn't have to have high social skills. I worked isolated most of the time. As a minilab operator, I was considered one of the best at all the places I worked at, thanks to the fact that I loved photography, read a lot of technical literature, and learned with two very good folks how to operate and maintain those machines. One of them had worked at a Kodak laboratory for more than a decade and had opened a photo lab along with two other business partners, the first photo lab I worked at. The other guy was a Noritsu consultant/technitian.

I started getting socially more engaged after I got involved with the church of Christ. If I was as socially engaged as I was after 2 or 3 years attending church and doing volunteering work when I started shooting, the story would have been different. Since I got involved with church, I have been often in contact with Americans and my English improved considerably. It was because of that that I had my first opportunity to teach English, helping some classmates at a course I was attending in which to have English was a very important requirement. My classmates noticed that I liked teaching and that I taught well, and they encouraged me to be an English teacher.

After about six years working at at least four English schools, I got the opportunity to have my own business, which is as a master franchisee for an English school specialized in private classes. This opportunity was offered to me by the same company I had been working for two and a half years as an EFL teacher, but only if I moved to a pretty far away city, which is where I live now. I had terrible headaches when I lived in my previous hometown, but my current hometown is cooler and drier, and it's also better for business, a little more developed, the fried and cooked food is amazing (except baked stuff, nothing special), and the accent is among the nicest in Brazil.

INITIAL INTEREST IN PHOTOGRAPHY
The first camera I've ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF, in the 80's; I used to disassemble and assemble it quite often. The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was still in the 80's, when the husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-letter-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided into many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries in these. One was about people, the other was about women, another one about nature, and one about architecture. I loved that kit. Decades later, already late 2000's, when I was able to understand English much better, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

In 1993, I was living in a city called Natal. I was riding a bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines, as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at that!" (in Portuguese, of course). I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mili/centimeters, and pounds and ounces to (kilo)grams, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese)—well, I started doing currency conversion from 1996 onward, as there was no 'real' in 1993, but only a temporary, transitional currency in 1994, and I was still not interested in currency conversions by 1995). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, gear guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

FIRST JOB IN PHOTOGRAPHY
In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, a small city in the countryside of the State of Paraíba, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I knew the folks there because they didn't have access to that kind of magazines and I used to go there to show them to them and talk about photography, and we enjoyed doing that and became friends.

While I was working there, I had the chance to handle and use some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3 and FM2, the Minolta Maxxum 9xi and X-370, and quite a large variety of Pentaxes, like the K2000, ME, and P30t; There were other cameras from same said brands and other brands, like Vivitar and Yashica. Canons were rare and I don't know why. I can't remember ever seeing one, except compacts. But, two brands I wanted so much to have an opportunity to see live were Contax, Ricoh, and Zeiss. I just drooled over seeing pictures of Contax bodies and Zeiss lenses. Even one or two of Contax compacts. I also wish I had seen more Olympus SLR's. I also drooled over its µ-II.

I'M GONNA ADD MORE LATER.

Comments

Total: 355, showing: 301 – 320
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On article Review: Nokia 808 PureView (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: amazing how nokia and zeiss got to this. nokia did a job i never expected them (nokia) to do in the photography area. they (nokia) did not content themselves to compete in the phone market, but in the photo market. i mean, professional photo market.

man, to have a phone being compared to a d800 to give us an idea how good it can perform is... weird?, great!?, absurd?, annoying? right? disorientating?... to which one would they compare if the d800 were not launched then? haaa!

and zeiss, my gosh... german lens engineering at its best. what the heck of a resolutive lens! and give a look at their lens design. i just found this image of it (http://www.allaboutsymbian.com/images/features/808-lenses.jpg).

congrats nokia (and zeiss)! i'm amazed.

yeah, i agree, but they needed a d800 to tell you that, right?

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 03:36 UTC
On article Review: Nokia 808 PureView (347 comments in total)

amazing how nokia and zeiss got to this. nokia did a job i never expected them (nokia) to do in the photography area. they (nokia) did not content themselves to compete in the phone market, but in the photo market. i mean, professional photo market.

man, to have a phone being compared to a d800 to give us an idea how good it can perform is... weird?, great!?, absurd?, annoying? right? disorientating?... to which one would they compare if the d800 were not launched then? haaa!

and zeiss, my gosh... german lens engineering at its best. what the heck of a resolutive lens! and give a look at their lens design. i just found this image of it (http://www.allaboutsymbian.com/images/features/808-lenses.jpg).

congrats nokia (and zeiss)! i'm amazed.

Link | Posted on Jul 31, 2012 at 16:34 UTC as 88th comment | 6 replies

these cameras are or well designed or have an interesting lens or nice features, but this sensor size is so boring...

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2012 at 15:26 UTC as 17th comment
On article Canon EOS M hands-on preview (566 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: it seems better looking and its thickness gives me the impression of being more robust. i like it, but there is one thing i didn't appreciated at first: they could make use of the g1 x sensor size, since it is a little smaller and could make possible more compact lenses and more distinction from their ff models.

canon is bringing, according to their rumor website, an entry-level ff, and that let me think they may lower the number of dslr offerings in favor of more mirrorless. good move. a lot of people, including me, would like to afford using an ff and never accepted aps size very well.

regarding the tradeoff between quality (but ignoring all the benefits of dof) and compactness, nothing, imo, comes better than the sony rx100 (nikon only needs to fine-tune their 1s). smaller sensors should have started to be avoided, unless for ultracomp internal zooms and cell phones.

about the price, now i understand that every launch is an opportunity for them to keep up with the economy variation (inflation), and thus they have to ask for more. but no doubt they are taking advantage of this fact and trying to make much more money on this model, since it has many mechanical components left out and consequently needs lots less manual labor involved. not very ethical (but not an exclusively action of canon either).

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2012 at 14:57 UTC
On article Canon EOS M hands-on preview (566 comments in total)

it seems better looking and its thickness gives me the impression of being more robust. i like it, but there is one thing i didn't appreciated at first: they could make use of the g1 x sensor size, since it is a little smaller and could make possible more compact lenses and more distinction from their ff models.

canon is bringing, according to their rumor website, an entry-level ff, and that let me think they may lower the number of dslr offerings in favor of more mirrorless. good move. a lot of people, including me, would like to afford using an ff and never accepted aps size very well.

regarding the tradeoff between quality (but ignoring all the benefits of dof) and compactness, nothing, imo, comes better than the sony rx100 (nikon only needs to fine-tune their 1s). smaller sensors should have started to be avoided, unless for ultracomp internal zooms and cell phones.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2012 at 14:48 UTC as 197th comment | 2 replies
On article Just Posted: Sony Cyber-shot DSC HX20V Review (61 comments in total)

well, they gotta have to continue to supply the consumers-led-by-the-megapixel-race market, right? i will not spend much time here saying how stupid is an 18mp camera with such a tiny sensor. i would never buy it (unless it had 10mp) and think rx100 is THE compact now.

but being positive about it, i liked the effectiveness of its image stabilisation system at full tele... and for not stopping here, i also liked dpreview using some dcr data to complete this review. and i didn't know dcr was the first review website. interesting to know that.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2012 at 00:02 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies

well syncronised pana and samsung are on lens range and aperture, aren't they?

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2012 at 15:08 UTC as 25th comment

this constant aperture is quite a good news when all its peers don't have it and quite appealing in such zoom range. congrats for the bound pushing, pana.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2012 at 15:03 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply

I already stopped to think that a curved sensor could make possible to acheive high resolution images using less complex optics, just like an eye does, and now this is becoming a reallity.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2012 at 00:11 UTC as 55th comment | 3 replies

I didn't get very well what Canon is preparing. OK, mirroless seems to be inevitable, but that G1 X with a sensor not much different compared to APS-C sounds confusing, because I guess it's gonna be a size to be part of a long road, and probably the mirroless system will adopt it. But if so, what's for the APS-C? Two closely sized sensors?! One for the built-in and mirroless, and the other for the SLRs?!

In my opinion, they should kill the APS-C and focus on the G1 X sensor size instead, whether for SLRs, mirroless, built-in, etc. That would be a great move to me. This way you would have a better separation of categories, of it from FF, for instance.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2012 at 14:40 UTC as 15th comment

I wonder why they (and other makers) don't make a 43 mm (though I don't remember now but I guess there is somewhere [recently launched]) pancake, as this is the truly "normal" lens in FF format. It's always a bit more (50), a bit less, but never THAT.

I also wonder why no maker try hard to make lenses for APS-C with larger apertures, since they're aimed to a class of camera supposedly not expected to have such high demand for quality than FF, thus not requiring such compromises to keep apertures down in favor of extreme quality.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2012 at 14:16 UTC as 48th comment | 2 replies
On article Just Posted: Canon EOS 5D Mark III review (672 comments in total)
In reply to:

Charlie boots: I have found DPR to be up to now reasonably impartial but this review is unfortunately biased towards the 5DIII. Every other review I have read on the web very strongly emphasizes the D800's groundbreaking technology over the 5DIII. Looking at DXO's sensor data the D800 gains the highest score of any and significantly outperforms the 5DIII.

Both are really great cameras with great image quality, however in a side by side comparison the D800 should come out ahead of the 5DIII, if only for dynamic range and video connectivity and value, everything else being equal.

Perhaps if you think of DPR only giving value to photography, the D800 is far the best option, but both reviews are giving video the proper weight (though DPR is aimed primarily at photography). The bars do not count handling, so only here (and not taking other aspects) you already have something to balance the general score.

Remember there are more things involved, like handling, usability, operability, "flowingness", versatility in a lot of situations and support (also support in the video industry), where the 5D Mk III is far better backed up (for now). Also, as I mentioned below, they spent many days with both, so I can't think of them betraying our "faith" on this website.

If I could buy one I would go for the D800, but I agree with their conclusion and score.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2012 at 16:46 UTC

Phew... I thought Pentax was going nuts after seeing those Q and K-01 launches, but it seems they only wanted to scare us a little.

This is a very good direction, investing where no other camera maker is. Most people looking for post-entry-level DSLR cameras, having the chance to compare the options, would take this one for sure. The ones who still would not, mmm..., few. Even the almost 4-year-old entry-level K-x already has some weather sealing.

Perfect as a family camera and the adventurer or careless with little budget. Congrats, Pentax!

Link | Posted on May 24, 2012 at 15:28 UTC as 11th comment
On article Just Posted: Canon EOS 5D Mark III review (672 comments in total)

I think the review was not biased. You have to have in mind that they actually used both cameras for many days. I would say biased if not having the camera or having it for little time, but they had it for a good amount of days and used it indoors, outdoors, in-lab, etc. That's why I don't believe it was biased. Anyway, I read the review again and the conclusion again and again, and then added the Nikon D800 for bar comparisons and both the text and the score are true to the reality, and show clearly were the D800 advantages are. I myself, if were an established and experienced filmmaker, I would still more likely to stick to the 5D Mk III (it's not about the camera itself only, but the history in filmmaking behind it), but if not or had photography at the same level as or higher than "movieing", would to the D800.

Good to note, though, that even for filmmakers looking for a FF camera upgrade that is already "fitted in" in the pro video industry, the D800 can definitely be a watershed

Link | Posted on May 24, 2012 at 15:11 UTC as 65th comment
On article Just Posted: Canon PowerShot SX150 IS review (85 comments in total)

I didn't like this post. I remember the time DPR used to review many of these compacts, but their attempts to bring collective reviews when it comes to budged (or of less quality, or compact, or whatever better call them) cameras were great and really reflect better DPR format today. A simple review for a single camera like this, though very welcome (the review itself), is not as interesting as would a collective one.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2012 at 14:46 UTC as 20th comment
On article Leica offers V-Lux40 20X 14MP compact superzoom (38 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I've seen products sharing the same basic structure but having different finishing and exterior, and I've seen products being marketed under different brands for different regions but at a similar price (or pos-launched under a cheaper brand name); but two identical products being marketed in the same place with huge difference in price is too odd for me to understand. I think there are a lot of people in Germany who doesn't know Panasonic or Panasonic cameras are not marketed in many places there, or at least the (similar) camera department is not marketed. I don't know. Too weird. There is a trick there.

Well then, it seems to me the 'show-off' and 'because it's a "loud"' name from Maloy and your last sentence may explain it all.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 17:32 UTC

Just think that this might be sharpest, best-color 'renderer', and best against-light 'dealer' lens in the world, and it's worth! But I think Leica could include a kind of GPS sensor to help find it in case being stolen.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 02:54 UTC as 46th comment
On article Leica offers V-Lux40 20X 14MP compact superzoom (38 comments in total)

I've seen products sharing the same basic structure but having different finishing and exterior, and I've seen products being marketed under different brands for different regions but at a similar price (or pos-launched under a cheaper brand name); but two identical products being marketed in the same place with huge difference in price is too odd for me to understand. I think there are a lot of people in Germany who doesn't know Panasonic or Panasonic cameras are not marketed in many places there, or at least the (similar) camera department is not marketed. I don't know. Too weird. There is a trick there.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 02:40 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
On article Just Posted: In-depth Nikon D800 review (541 comments in total)

I always was more a Canon fan, but Nikon did an amazing job with the D800. Though they have other remarkable cameras (D5100, D700, D3/4,...), it's the D800 I consider the THE camera of theirs. The first and only camera that does everything a Canon does (in practical terms and generally speaking) and something else much more.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2012 at 13:45 UTC as 44th comment | 3 replies

I admire Canon very much and think they are the kind of brand that takes risks, differently from Nikon, which I also admire almost the same level (not that often), but that plays much more in the conservative or tried-and-tested (by others) side. But, I have to tell you, a light-leak problem coming from Canon and in a camera like this one did impress me. I've never imagined such thing could happen. It looks like amateurs, beginners fail; something easily forgiven in a handmade camera.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2012 at 01:55 UTC as 25th comment | 1 reply
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