iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Works as a Coordinator and EFL Teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

I was born in João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. I lived in a few other cities, but always in the Northeastern region. I got frustrated about how marginalized the professions I had chosen are in Brazil and ended up never going to college. I worked briefly as a photographer. I loved it, but since I have never been a very engaging person socially speaking (probably due to depression I found out I had much time later) and could not get any help (the closer I got to it were people thinking about it more like a laziness issue, and convincing me of that, making me isolate myself more and more), and I ended up giving up. Then, I worked with motorcycle sales and also with photo shops operating minilabs.

I then got involved with the church of Christ and I started to be able to look at myself in a clearer way and realize the problems I had and what I needed to do. During this time, I improved my English a lot by often being in contact with Americans, and I was encouraged to teach English. After about six years as a teacher, I got the opportunity to have my own business, a franchise especialized in private English classes. Although I had got a whole lot better, but still aware of my insuficiently high and constant positive mood, that kept me from continue being a photographer back then, I now work with a person that is an expert in marketing, the kind of profissional that, if I had back then, I would have been a 20-year-career photographer by now. Along with this business, came the first opportunity to leave the Northeastern region of Brazil.

The first camera I have ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF. It happened to me to work as a photographer in the 90's, but I always had problems working by myself (not having the skills to do that marketing thing; socializing and stuff; and thus, feeling discouraged) and I didn't care to find a partner. What I needed was someone to help me promote my work, just as described in the previous paragraph. I don't work with photography, but I can say I still do something I love. I have always liked English, so it never gets old. And most things I've learned through reading, including photography, were written in English.

The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was in the 80's. The husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-letter-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided into many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries in them. One was about people, the other was about women, another one, about nature, and one about architecture. I loved that kit. Later on, when I was able to understand some English, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

In 1993, I was living in a city called Natal, RN. I was riding my bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at that!" I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mm and cm, and pounds and ounces to kgs, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, camera and lens guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, PB, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I got to know the folks there because they didn't have access that kind of magazines and I used to go there and take mine and talk about photography, and we enjoyed that a lot and we became friends. While I was working there, I had the chance to handle some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3, FM2, Minolta Maxxum 9xi, and some others from Pentax. Canon was rare.

Comments

Total: 202, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »

I'm happy to see Fujifilm doing this. It doesn't make sense to move from film to digital and have big sensors in so expensive cameras only. It feels like living the USA, where you have plenty of F150s, Tacomas, Silverados, etc, and move to, let's say, Germany, where the biggest you will find are Rangers, Amaroks, Frontiers, etc. In the beginning, alright, due to technological and demand reasons, but now camera companies can be bolder and make juicier (whatever way you can interpret that; for one's hands, for instance) cameras.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 02:03 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

Lars V: Might not be ideal for a digital sensor. Not a retrofocus design.

The retrofocus design is only helpful in cameras that have a mirror, forcing short focal length lenses to compensate the extra distance, and old digital cameras that the sensor pixels were deep, cutting off part of the light traveling at very angled paths. Neither is a problem with this camera.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 02:08 UTC
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with the Kodak Super 8 (417 comments in total)

I think it would be more interesting if Kodak had launched a similar product but for 16mm film. It makes no sense to me filming in a film area that small, not even as a nostalgia thing.

Two observations about the article:
1. Although I understand the relation between the lens aperture compared to an equiv in FF, the calculation made, and it makes sense, for practical information though, is absolutely pointless. For practical puposes, the lens will transmit as much light as a 40mm f/1.2 would in FF;
2. "can be set in the camera's menu" (slide 6). I have seen a lot of people writing genetive case with object-object, but it is not right, is it?

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 21:31 UTC as 111th comment | 1 reply

I think that I still have to see multilayer sensors a standard to believe digital has really surpassed analog. At low ISO, pictures taken with Sigma's Foveon sensor are unbeatable. Nothing compares to the depth produced by a multilayer sensor.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 02:01 UTC as 82nd comment | 4 replies
On article Happy Holidays from DPReview (149 comments in total)

Merry Christmas, you all at DPR too!

Link | Posted on Dec 25, 2016 at 17:33 UTC as 93rd comment
On article Sigma releases price and availability for sd Quattro H (376 comments in total)
In reply to:

Saurat: "Reached out..." This appears to be the latest twee and illiterate Americanism to blight the English language. Well, I for one will not put up with the plague and I declare myself offended and insulted having to read such bilge. The word 'contacted' was still in use last time I checked and this noun splendidly describes your action. 'Reached out' is teenage hipster nonsense.

As a non-native English speaker, I've found it interesting and funny how the use of 'reached out' instead of 'contact' called that much attention in a negative way in this context (I wonder if it express in a such way in other contexts). It is a little hard for me to put it into words, but I can get the difference and don't think 'contact' would pass the same idea, although very close. I had learned once that one will use more romantic words to sound formal or smarter or something, but I never really minded to make sure this is true. For me it's not because my language is romantic, so while an anglicized word will sound exoctic to me, 'intelligent' or 'particular' and the like will sound so to English speakers. Well, my intention is not to judge, but just expose my surprise.

Let me ask a question to you that are native English speakers. Does the use of more romantic words sound better (more natural and/or fluent) in a casual conversation?

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2016 at 21:01 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: the dual-lens Kodak EasyShare V570 (21 comments in total)

I owed one and I liked it in many ways, but one day I asked a friend to put it in his bag but he left the pocket open and as we were getting in a car at night, it fell off the bag between the car and the curb and we didn't notice. We only realized that hours later and someone had already claimed its new ownership.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2016 at 03:09 UTC as 6th comment

Very interesting! I always wanted to see how they sliced cameras and lenses and stuff. Thanks!

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2016 at 21:04 UTC as 41st comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Olympus C-3040 Zoom (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: I wish you guys would talk more about these cameras in a modern context. I don't really care what your thoughts on it were when it came out. What made it significant? What was its impact? What were your personal experiences with it? Context is everything.

Yeah, I agree. If I want to know their thoughts back then, just go read its review. They can get a used one, use it a little, and give some thoughts, how it feels, looks, etc, now, but of course, cutting some slack for some obvious things that may not need to be talked about, like how the screen is small or how few pixels it has, for example.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2016 at 00:22 UTC
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (764 comments in total)

The first camera I have ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177x.
My first camera was a Sonora Love.
My first digicam was an Aiptek Pocket DV.

Three poopoo.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2016 at 02:07 UTC as 134th comment
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I always compare the colors of every new gallery that is published with Sigma's Foveon cameras galleries. The color depth they produce has been unbeatable in my opinion so far. There is not a single shot that denounces itself to be a digital image and not from film. I hope Sigma is working hard to make their next Foveon cameras more popular. That kind of processor is, IMO, the true depart from film, because it really does what film does.

BlueBomberTurbo, the Sigmas are the sharpest, but even if you ignore that and consider only the colors, the difference is significant. IMO, I haven't seen a sensor to reproduce colors as deep as a Foveon-type sensor. That's to big step, I think. Until then, it looks to me as if digital photography has never really reached maturity. For most people, perhaps, that's fine, but not for me. I have trained eyes and the difference is 'gritante' (shouting) as we say in Portuguese.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 02:48 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I always compare the colors of every new gallery that is published with Sigma's Foveon cameras galleries. The color depth they produce has been unbeatable in my opinion so far. There is not a single shot that denounces itself to be a digital image and not from film. I hope Sigma is working hard to make their next Foveon cameras more popular. That kind of processor is, IMO, the true depart from film, because it really does what film does.

notpc, you probably don't know what I'm talking about. If you at least notice the difference (check out Sigma's galleries, but ignore high ISO images), it'll be good enough.

Link | Posted on Oct 3, 2016 at 22:33 UTC

I always compare the colors of every new gallery that is published with Sigma's Foveon cameras galleries. The color depth they produce has been unbeatable in my opinion so far. There is not a single shot that denounces itself to be a digital image and not from film. I hope Sigma is working hard to make their next Foveon cameras more popular. That kind of processor is, IMO, the true depart from film, because it really does what film does.

Link | Posted on Oct 2, 2016 at 01:23 UTC as 7th comment | 5 replies
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (699 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

@BeaverTerror, if you live in China, you should know better than me. Thanks!

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 00:01 UTC

This thingie looks noice!

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 12:07 UTC as 132nd comment | 2 replies
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (699 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

@cosinaphile, a Chinese brand is different from an American brand made in China. It's even different from a Chinese brand that is controlled by another country's brand. I have a problem with Chinese brands that don't pay at least more than 50% in royalties over technologies to non-pro-communism/socialism countries. It may seem silly, but that's a real issue for me.

Based on that, I should not be really worried about this camera, because it seems to me they are probably using a lot of components and technologies that either come from non-pro-communism/socialism countries, are manufactured by from non-pro-communism/socialism countries' companies located in China, or are manufactured by Chinese companies under lisence from non-pro-communism/socialism contries' companies.

I don't really know if that's the case. I hope it is.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 11:51 UTC
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (699 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

@great Javier, I understand your point now. It makes sense.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 11:41 UTC
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (699 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Mentalizing... "I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera, I don't want to buy a Chinese-brand camera,..."

Safer buy? What do you mean by that?

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 21:32 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I've seen some nice line of cameras ending with great final products and leaving people like "Aaaah..." and "What? Nooo!" This one seems more like that is the case. I so no point for a SLT camera anymore. Sony has gone too far with mirrorless already. This may be part of the investment plan of the A system, which do not include only leaving owners of the A system accessories orphan when they ended camera developments, but also owners of Zeiss lenses. Maybe, there's nothing to do, but the fact is that I've seen nice lines end bossy like that.

I was not aware of that. I missed that detail. Thank you.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 20:48 UTC

I've seen some nice line of cameras ending with great final products and leaving people like "Aaaah..." and "What? Nooo!" This one seems more like that is the case. I so no point for a SLT camera anymore. Sony has gone too far with mirrorless already. This may be part of the investment plan of the A system, which do not include only leaving owners of the A system accessories orphan when they ended camera developments, but also owners of Zeiss lenses. Maybe, there's nothing to do, but the fact is that I've seen nice lines end bossy like that.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 16:08 UTC as 107th comment | 2 replies
Total: 202, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »