iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Works as a English school coordinator and EFL teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

I was born in João Pessoa, Brazil. I lived in a few other cities in three neighboring states in the northeastern region before moving to where I currently live, about 1,300 miles away down south. Back then, photography was not offered at colleges and universities, and I never got a higher education. I tried to get in the AirForce—they offered the career of aerial photographer (don't know if they still do)—but I could not get in because they detected a health problem. I tried to work with social photography, and shoot a couple of birthday parties and some portraits, but I wasn't successful. I liked the experience, but I had never been a very social person and the few clients I got had been with the help of my mother.

I was living by myself and in a different city, and I was not able to prospect any clients by myself or get any indication from the few folks I had done work for. I was just to shy to ask for indications. I had some issues related to lack of perseverance. I was constantly feeling down since my later teenager years. I ended up giving up and working with motorcycle sales, an area in which I was also unsuccessful because it had to be socially more engaged as well, but I thought that it was going to work just because I liked motorcycles. After, I found an opportunity to work at those 1-hour photo labs/shops as a minilab operator. Now I was able to do a better job, probably because I didn't need to have high social skills. I worked isolated most of the time. As a minilab operator, I was considered one of the best at all the places I worked at, thanks to the fact that I loved photography, read a lot of technical literature, and learned how to operate and maintain those machines from very good folks. One of them had worked at a Kodak laboratory for more than a decade and opened a photo lab along with two other business partners, and it was the first photo lab I worked at. The other one was a Noritsu consultant/technitian.

I started to get socially more engaged after I got involved with the church of Christ. If I was as socially engaged as I was after 2 or 3 years attending church and doing volunteering work when I started shooting, the story would have been different. Since I got involved with church, I have been often in contact with Americans and my English improved considerably.
It was because of that that I had my first opportunity to teach English, helping some classmates at a course I was attending in which English was an asset. My classmates noticed that I liked teaching and taught well, and they encouraged me to be an English teacher.

After about six years working at at least four schools, I got the opportunity to have my own business, an English school franchise for private classes. This opportunity was offered me by the current company I had been working for as a teacher for two and a half years, but only if I moved to a pretty far city, where I live now. My current hometown is cooler and drier (I had terrible headaches in the Northeast because of the heat and higher humidity), it's also good for business, a little more developed, the fried and cooked food is amazing (except baked stuff, nothing special), and the accent is among the nicest in Brazil (if not the nicest).

INITIAL INTEREST IN PHOTOGRAPHY
The first camera I've ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF, in the 80's; I used to disassemble and assemble it quite often. The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was still in the 80's, when the husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-letter-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided into many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries in them. One was about people, the other was about women, another one, about nature, and one about architecture. I loved that kit. Decades later, already late 2000's, when I was able to understand English much better, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

In 1993, I was living in a city called Natal. I was riding a bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines, as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at that!" (in Portuguese, of course). I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mili/centimeters, and pounds and ounces to (kilo)grams, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese)—well, I started doing currency conversion from 1996 onward, as there was no 'real' in 1993, but only a temporary, transitioning currency in 1994, and I was still not interested in currency conversions by 1995). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, gear guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

FIRST JOB IN PHOTOGRAPHY
In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, in the neighboring state, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I knew the folks there because they didn't have access that kind of magazines and I used to go there to show them to them and talk about photography, and we enjoyed that a lot and we became friends. While I was working there, and SLR-wise, I had the chance to handle (not only, but more extensively) some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3 and FM2, Minolta Maxxum 9xi and X-370, and quite a large variety of Pentaxes, like the K2000, ME, and P30t. There were other cameras from same said brands and other brands, like Vivitar and Yashica. Canons were rare; I don't know why. I can't really remember handling a single SLR, except compacts. But, two brands I wanted so much to have an opportunity to see live were Contax, Ricoh, and Zeiss. I just drooled over seeing pictures Contax bodies and Zeiss lenses. Even one or two of Contax compacts. I also wish I had seen more Olympuses' SLR's. I also drooled over its µ-II.

I'M GONNA ADD MORE LATER.

Comments

Total: 296, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

iae aa eia: Here it goes again. A company grows big and starts to do more than it is supposed to do, and thus, because of the crime of a few, most users will have to be annoyed. What's next? After you have made several searches for animals, a new message saying "We've noticed that you have searched for animals a lot lately despite of our warnings. What are your intentions?"

@Dante Birchen Well, move to a more socialist country and live there making twice as much as the average citizen for 2 years and than 3 more years making just the average, and you will change your mind about Trump. One suggestion: Brazil. The aveage salary here is about 1900 reais (575 dollars as of today, but things costing 2 to 10 times more, and you don't have access to 10% of what's available in the States). 02 years making 3800 reais and 03 more years making 1900. You have to start from zero here. Don't bring or use any money you already have. Do that, man, and you'll learn a good lesson. And don't bring your gear. As I said, start from scratch. Buy a new camera (and everything else, including clothes) here with the money made here.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 15:59 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Here it goes again. A company grows big and starts to do more than it is supposed to do, and thus, because of the crime of a few, most users will have to be annoyed. What's next? After you have made several searches for animals, a new message saying "We've noticed that you have searched for animals a lot lately despite of our warnings. What are your intentions?"

@Dante Birchen Haha! What does Trump have to do with this, man? I don't agree with you. This is what makes the world boring and confusing. You can look at people in two different ways: trustworthy or untrustworthy. You can either consider a person innocent until proven guilty or guilty until proven innocent. When you do this kind of thing, you are taking a step toward assuming that the person reading the warning is somehow under watch or can be under watch.

If it showed the results and the warning, for example, in discreet letters at the bottom of the screen, then it was going to be ok. If someone is doing something wrong, they will eventually be denounced. This all-politically-correct attitude is a double-standard attitude typical of leftists. When you stop to see things closely, you see how this social justice warrior behavior is faulty.

That's why Trump won, by the way. Because of the left's hypocrisy. He's a president for people that are driven by facts, not feelings.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 00:53 UTC

Here it goes again. A company grows big and starts to do more than it is supposed to do, and thus, because of the crime of a few, most users will have to be annoyed. What's next? After you have made several searches for animals, a new message saying "We've noticed that you have searched for animals a lot lately despite of our warnings. What are your intentions?"

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 23:26 UTC as 7th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

ovlov: This is the Trump of the camera gear world. This is the camera that will Make Photography Great Again!

I'm tired of winning... Not.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 23:16 UTC
In reply to:

ovlov: This is the Trump of the camera gear world. This is the camera that will Make Photography Great Again!

And who and what is WhoeverYouVotedForOrWishedHaveWon in the camera gear world? And what gear would that person represent? I'm curious.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2017 at 00:52 UTC

Really? They sure are good photos, but I'm sad that there's nothing worth a prize from our truly beautiful capitalistic world with our outstanding views and constructions and amazing Western people. Even Western people sad and crying may look better. No offense.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 23:40 UTC as 5th comment

It's very difficult for a company to survive in Brazil, and Nikon has not had a good strategy in this country. So, it seems to me to be a smart decision.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2017 at 01:14 UTC as 105th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I think that it won't take much longer until terrorists try to bring a plane down using a drone. If they manage to start it quickly and it's one that can carry a good weight and fly fast, they can try to hit a plane when it's close to land since they are flying low.

Or, they can fly empty drones, but fast ones, many at once, perhaps one at each engine. If all the engines are damaged even if just 20 seconds prior to land, it can lose enough speed and stall or force the pilot to increase the rate of descent and land violently.

It's still a hard maneuver for a drone, but I would already be warning the industry and thinking about how to avoid this if I were some kind of important adviser in the aviation field.

Yes, there are other tools. Like what? A slingshot? A gun? It has to be a big caliber gun, or a bazooka, and you have to hit all the engines if you do that during landing to make it lose control or land hard enough to cause death or serious injury. And it would call a lot of attention during inumerous processes, the purchase, handling it at home, putting in the car, transporting, putting it our and mounting it.

Not an easy thing to do without being noticed, but drones are a normal thing, and you can use empty and fast drones, more than one, and try to hit all the engines. I think that an engine doesn't resist sucking a drone. Even if you choose small drones and the engines resist sucking it, they can attach a small piece of hard metal to it. If the engine fan blades don't project it out during the impact, bye-bye engine.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2017 at 22:10 UTC

I think that it won't take much longer until terrorists try to bring a plane down using a drone. If they manage to start it quickly and it's one that can carry a good weight and fly fast, they can try to hit a plane when it's close to land since they are flying low.

Or, they can fly empty drones, but fast ones, many at once, perhaps one at each engine. If all the engines are damaged even if just 20 seconds prior to land, it can lose enough speed and stall or force the pilot to increase the rate of descent and land violently.

It's still a hard maneuver for a drone, but I would already be warning the industry and thinking about how to avoid this if I were some kind of important adviser in the aviation field.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2017 at 19:50 UTC as 70th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

JBrown86: I for one can't stand drones. I think they should only be sold to working professionals and require a licence to operate. All "toys" should have a maximum capped flying high of 50ft

This is the kind of solution we are full of here in Brazil. Instead of punishing a law breaker exemplarily, they regulate more and more. The majority paying the price for the mistake of a few. It's an easy solution, but the kind of solution that makes people's lives suck.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2017 at 19:11 UTC
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: 10 years ago, Canon and Nikon laughed at Sony.

Today, it really feels like Sony is on their own plain...as much as Canon and Nikon shooters try to make things "us vs. them" it's just not that.

Sure, market share matters....but Sony doesn't seem to be even a little interested in competing with Canon and Nikon, and Canon and Nikon, much to my bewilderment, seem to be foolishly letting Sony get generation after generation ahead.

This is one of those situations where Sony is going to achieve critical mass, and just explode. Right now, in some of the open photography groups, if you ask "which camera should I get" you now get MORE people saying the Sony a6000 than any other camera. If you understand the math, that fact alone is just staggering.

But this is about momentum, and Sony has a freight train of it, and Canon and Nikon are literally going in the other direction.

I'm not sure Canon and Nikon laughed at Nikon. It's more like Canon and Nikon users underestimated Sony, they who laughed at Sony. I think that Nikon has been slow to solve issues, and Canon... Man, I don't think Canon is doing bad. Keep in mind that Canon's and Nikon's businesses are not about photographic equipment only. If we stick to the photo equipment, I wouldn't say that Canon is bad compared to Sony. Nikon maybe, but not Canon.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2017 at 00:25 UTC
On article Hands-on with new Tamron 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 Di VC USD (79 comments in total)

Barney, some of us like to see photos where we can see the lens element, if you don't mind.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2017 at 14:04 UTC as 5th comment

The Pixel shift multi shooting feature allows it to achieve the same color naturalness the Sigma Foveon sensor does. Although at the price of multiples shots, and not only one, still deserves a kudos for that.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2017 at 02:33 UTC as 51st comment
On article Canon G1 X III vs. Sony Cybershot RX100 V (632 comments in total)

Although their form factors are reasonably different, I'm afraid the comparison is fair, since the market they seem to be aimed at seems to me to be the same. Canon going with a darker lens to match Sony's in bokeh equivalence was very smart, since they seem to me to have put more resources in sharpening an already easier-to-make-sharp lens than in making a bright lens sharp, in other words, Canon's image quality is expected to be better than Sony's, and whoever chooses it instead won't miss any bokeh they would have with the Sony.

I don't know what to say about video because I almost never shoot videos, and I myself don't know if I would care that my camera had 4k video. My biggest criticism goes to Canon's design, although I don't like Sony's either. Canon's bulky, significantly less portable, for the market it's aimed at.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2017 at 15:03 UTC as 154th comment | 3 replies

It's not expensive if we consider the competition and if it does great with its so-so features (FullHD only, but less rolling shutter, for example), but, in my opinion, it doesn't look attractive and could offer a brighter lens for the short range (2.8-4.8). Or, the camera could be a little cheaper. I don't know, but if I had the money and was looking for a large-sensor built-in zoom non-retro style camera, this one wouldn't be it.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 14:00 UTC as 105th comment
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I'm gonna give an idea for free here, and the camera company that takes it and puts it in practice, will be offering something interesting and not expensive.

Make a camera with a tiny sensor and, instead of designing a lens for it, design a speedboster-like optical adapter (that really reduces the image to fit everything into the tiny sensor) built into the camera and offer different mount adaptors for manual fullframe lenses.

That would allow for the old FF lenses to be used again, but with the advantage of being super bright and producing the same bokeh effect. It wouldn't need to be the utmost quality "speedbooster," because the old manual lenses are not that good, so the final quality would not be that Oooh, but it would be an interesting and fun camera, and could be sold for a good price.

Class A, did you care to read everything? My text contains this part "that really reduces the image to fit everything into the tiny sensor."

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2017 at 16:17 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I'm gonna give an idea for free here, and the camera company that takes it and puts it in practice, will be offering something interesting and not expensive.

Make a camera with a tiny sensor and, instead of designing a lens for it, design a speedboster-like optical adapter (that really reduces the image to fit everything into the tiny sensor) built into the camera and offer different mount adaptors for manual fullframe lenses.

That would allow for the old FF lenses to be used again, but with the advantage of being super bright and producing the same bokeh effect. It wouldn't need to be the utmost quality "speedbooster," because the old manual lenses are not that good, so the final quality would not be that Oooh, but it would be an interesting and fun camera, and could be sold for a good price.

Class A, "The booster has a magnification of 0.5x and produces a 2.8x crop factor when used with the Q and Q10, and a 2.3x factor with the Q7 and Q-S1." (from the article).

There still is a crop factor. A heck of a crop factor.

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2017 at 00:35 UTC

I'm gonna give an idea for free here, and the camera company that takes it and puts it in practice, will be offering something interesting and not expensive.

Make a camera with a tiny sensor and, instead of designing a lens for it, design a speedboster-like optical adapter (that really reduces the image to fit everything into the tiny sensor) built into the camera and offer different mount adaptors for manual fullframe lenses.

That would allow for the old FF lenses to be used again, but with the advantage of being super bright and producing the same bokeh effect. It wouldn't need to be the utmost quality "speedbooster," because the old manual lenses are not that good, so the final quality would not be that Oooh, but it would be an interesting and fun camera, and could be sold for a good price.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2017 at 01:34 UTC as 106th comment | 5 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Sigma SD1 (237 comments in total)

Under a low ISO and with the color temp well balanced, no camera matches the color depth of a Foveon sensor. No camera, not even the al-galaxy-mighty D850. It would be the ultimate advance (even more than flexible sensors, in my opinion) in sensor technology if Sigma manages to acheive better high ISO's and video from it.

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2017 at 20:00 UTC as 36th comment

Awesome! One detail unrelated to the point of the story is how the color balance and rendering, and the technology of modern screens improved at 03:06. The colors are very close to real life. Just 10 years ago, a photo of a live view screen would look terrible. Perhaps, even 5 years ago would look already bad enough.

Link | Posted on Sep 25, 2017 at 14:58 UTC as 34th comment
Total: 296, showing: 1 – 20
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