iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Works as a English school coordinator and EFL teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

I was born in Brazil, in a city called João Pessoa. I lived in a few other cities in three neighboring states before moving to where I currently live, about 1,300 miles away down south, Belo Horizonte. Back then, photography was not offered at colleges and universities, I didn't want any other courses, and I never got a higher education. I tried to get in the AirForce—they offered the career of aerial photographer (don't know if they still do)—but I could not get in because they detected a health problem. I started working with social photography. I shot a couple of birthday parties and some portraits, but I wasn't successful. I liked the experience, but I had never been a very social person and the few clients I had I got with the help of my mother.

During this time, I was living by myself and in a different city, and I was not able to prospect any clients by myself or get any references from the few folks I had done work for. I was just to shy to ask for references. I had some issues related to lack of perseverance. I was constantly feeling down since my later teenager years. I ended up giving up and working with motorcycle sales, an area in which I was also unsuccessful because I had to be socially more engaged as well, but I thought that it was going to work just because I liked motorcycles. After a while, I got an opportunity to work at those 1-hour photo labs/shops as a minilab operator. Now I was able to do a better job, probably because I didn't have to have high social skills. I worked isolated most of the time. As a minilab operator, I was considered one of the best at all the places I worked at, thanks to the fact that I loved photography, read a lot of technical literature, and learned with two very good folks how to operate and maintain those machines. One of them had worked at a Kodak laboratory for more than a decade and had opened a photo lab along with two other business partners, the first photo lab I worked at. The other guy was a Noritsu consultant/technitian.

I started getting socially more engaged after I got involved with the church of Christ. If I was as socially engaged as I was after 2 or 3 years attending church and doing volunteering work when I started shooting, the story would have been different. Since I got involved with church, I have been often in contact with Americans and my English improved considerably. It was because of that that I had my first opportunity to teach English, helping some classmates at a course I was attending in which to have English was a very important requirement. My classmates noticed that I liked teaching and that I taught well, and they encouraged me to be an English teacher.

After about six years working at at least four English schools, I got the opportunity to have my own business, which is as a master franchisee for an English school specialized in private classes. This opportunity was offered to me by the same company I had been working for two and a half years as an EFL teacher, but only if I moved to a pretty far away city, which is where I live now. I had terrible headaches when I lived in my previous hometown, but my current hometown is cooler and drier, and it's also better for business, a little more developed, the fried and cooked food is amazing (except baked stuff, nothing special), and the accent is among the nicest in Brazil.

INITIAL INTEREST IN PHOTOGRAPHY
The first camera I've ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF, in the 80's; I used to disassemble and assemble it quite often. The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was still in the 80's, when the husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-letter-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided into many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries in these. One was about people, the other was about women, another one about nature, and one about architecture. I loved that kit. Decades later, already late 2000's, when I was able to understand English much better, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

In 1993, I was living in a city called Natal. I was riding a bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines, as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at that!" (in Portuguese, of course). I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mili/centimeters, and pounds and ounces to (kilo)grams, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese)—well, I started doing currency conversion from 1996 onward, as there was no 'real' in 1993, but only a temporary, transitional currency in 1994, and I was still not interested in currency conversions by 1995). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, gear guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

FIRST JOB IN PHOTOGRAPHY
In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, a small city in the countryside of the State of Paraíba, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I knew the folks there because they didn't have access to that kind of magazines and I used to go there to show them to them and talk about photography, and we enjoyed doing that and became friends.

While I was working there, I had the chance to handle and use some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3 and FM2, the Minolta Maxxum 9xi and X-370, and quite a large variety of Pentaxes, like the K2000, ME, and P30t; There were other cameras from same said brands and other brands, like Vivitar and Yashica. Canons were rare and I don't know why. I can't remember ever seeing one, except compacts. But, two brands I wanted so much to have an opportunity to see live were Contax, Ricoh, and Zeiss. I just drooled over seeing pictures of Contax bodies and Zeiss lenses. Even one or two of Contax compacts. I also wish I had seen more Olympus SLR's. I also drooled over its µ-II.

I'M GONNA ADD MORE LATER.

Comments

Total: 329, showing: 1 – 20
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Google follows a leftardy agenda that seeks to control people. This tool doesn't look like contributing too much to that compared to making calls for you and speaking as if it were you.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2018 at 01:51 UTC as 11th comment
In reply to:

MightyMike: Number fudging!

75mm F0.95 (lets say F1.0) should require a 75mm front element.... So... how does it take 72mm filters????

Now if it was a 77mm thread or even more likely an 82mm thread then sure by all means it makes sense.

Mike

By the way, someone said the entrance pupil is outside of a lens. No, it is not. The pupil entrance is the first element (and then, the aperture stop for smaller aperture settings in a non-retrofocus optical design, and always or almost always at the aperture stop for all aperture settings for lenses with a retrofocus design) because you can't gather rays of light that are out of reach of the front element diameter.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2018 at 19:14 UTC
In reply to:

MightyMike: Number fudging!

75mm F0.95 (lets say F1.0) should require a 75mm front element.... So... how does it take 72mm filters????

Now if it was a 77mm thread or even more likely an 82mm thread then sure by all means it makes sense.

Mike

If this lens is really 75mm f/0.95, its front element must be 81mm in diameter, so the filter thread can be, maybe, 82mm. 87mm would sound right. It's more like a 73 or 72mm on paper. But there is a lot of space between the lens and the filter thread, probably more than 5mm, which makes me believe the front element is 72mm large at most, and if you consider 1mm relief on the glass edge, you have a 70mm pupil entrance. 75 (if it's really a 75mm) by 70 equals f/1.07.

In order to be 0.95, considering the pupil entrance is 70mm in diameter, the real focal lens is 66.5mm. I don't doubt this could be the case, although it would sound very wrong to advertise a lens with such a difference. If you take a look at some papers, for example, when a lens design patent is revealed, the real number tends to be fractioned. For instance, a 24-70mm can be actually at 24.76-67.9mm.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2018 at 19:13 UTC
In reply to:

MightyMike: Number fudging!

75mm F0.95 (lets say F1.0) should require a 75mm front element.... So... how does it take 72mm filters????

Now if it was a 77mm thread or even more likely an 82mm thread then sure by all means it makes sense.

Mike

Good point. The ring around the front element should be more than 5mm wide, which would mean that the front element is no larger than 62mm. Let's take 2mm as glass margin (1mm at each diagonal corner of the frame) and we have 60mm. This is equivalent to an aperture of f/1.25. Way less that advertised. Also, I find quite unlikely for it to have any optical tricks under its sleeve considering such a compact optical design of only 5 elements in 5 groups. I'm curious to see what reviewers are gonna reveal about this lens.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2018 at 02:40 UTC
In reply to:

Gon0S: Seriously, this video is so lame as is the title of the video...

Just another try to spit on dSLR...

Just another useless clickbait article coming from Petapixel...

Why on earth put an almost 6k USD to an average 1K lense and use badly taken pics in the worst case this setup could produce, against a lousy chinese addon lense for a forgotten price Apple iPhone...
For same result for the SLR, he could have picked a entry level canon Rebel, and then the price could bet 1035 USD (yeah, the iphone is more or less 1000 USD, not ZERO) vs 1500 USD !

He could compare the performance between a Lada Niva 4x4 vs a porsche 911 trying to climb a mud trail... it would be as awesome and trustable.

No serious person would recommend a piece of crap like that. Come on, this is the US, not a third world country. People should encourage quality, never the opposite. You can find stuff at a low price that can do something, but that kit is total trash to whoever gives importance to optics, and he does considering the gear he uses. That kit exposes nearly all the optical issues engineers have been working on for more than a century to solve. I got the idea of the video, but it was the end, recommending it, even if gently, reluctantly, that upset me.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2018 at 17:47 UTC

That very initial jump in oneself's perception is really hard to avoid, even taking those steps, because we feel very excited by the first things we take and make right in the beginning. It's the beginning. It's like telling a person not to feel extremely excited, encouraged, and not to boast when they drive a car well for the first time, for example. I'm not saying that the steps in the video don't work, but just that honestly putting oneself under the application of them, at least in the very beginning, is very very hard. I can't see reason winning over feeling in the very beginning. In this sense, a person that wants to be a photographer but does not love it, just like it, is at advantage, since their anxiety is lower, their expectations are lower. Anxiety seems to me to be one important factor in this initial high level of wrong perception.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2018 at 02:08 UTC as 37th comment
In reply to:

tranceliner: when the Chinese become the innovators beating the Koreans and Americans....

I think that destroy was the wrong word. I could say subdue maybe. Have control in some way, but more than what the US is to China.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2018 at 01:55 UTC
In reply to:

tranceliner: when the Chinese become the innovators beating the Koreans and Americans....

Besides that, it is a communist country (I know some people that travel there every year to buy stuff and they told me how closed and controlled the country is). But, look, I'm don't care that they are as they are. What bothers me is how many Americans, leftists mostly, let them compete with us as if we were dealing with pairs. China does not want to simply compete with the US. They want to destroy the US.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 03:00 UTC
In reply to:

tranceliner: when the Chinese become the innovators beating the Koreans and Americans....

Because the leftist in America care poop about how China exploits their workers. China would take much longer to acheive this (if ever) if they played by the Western's rules. Do you have any ideia of how, let's say, the majority of China's population live and what their benefits are compared to the majority of the US population?

I remember, back in the early 90's, how popular it was for some Brazilians to travel to Paraguay to buy cheap counterfeit Chinese products to resell in Brazil to friends. Today they are official sold here in malls. You have access to, for example, JBL headphones copies. Even the logo on the box, which would be a bit different in the past, like Sony is Zony, for example, today they don't even change that. There is only a tiny text on the box identifying it as a counterfeit product. This is intellectual property theft, and I have seen this all these decades.

So, the Chinese have made us and their pop pay a high price for their "acheivements." Wake up!

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 02:52 UTC
On article Here's why your beloved film SLR is never going digital (295 comments in total)

Cool! One can't really expect the quality of a regular digital, but it has got somewhere. The optical distortion, probably caused by bad lens-to-sensor or lens-to-focusing screen alignment, is the worst, but there is room for improvement. Better focusing screen, better sensor, better sensor lens, better alignment, etc.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2018 at 02:54 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

iae aa eia: 'Opera' doesn't sound good to my ears. 'Art' does. And 50mm is not the standard focal length for FF. 43mm is, and only Pentax has such a lens. Canon seems to have a 40.

@J A C S Not a counterargument. Your argument so far is basically, "We believe the standard focal length for FF is 50mm, and the reason why is that the companies that make our church think that a round number like 50 will sell more and that the attendees are dumb and thus not disagreeable enough to question the lack of preciseness. They just baa and accept it without ever checking it in their own Bibles."

Seriously, man, how come we can pay thousands of dollars for a camera, for its preciseness and features and whatnot, and in case of certain cameras, made like pieces of work-of-art, and I am denied a truly standard lens?

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2018 at 16:44 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: 'Opera' doesn't sound good to my ears. 'Art' does. And 50mm is not the standard focal length for FF. 43mm is, and only Pentax has such a lens. Canon seems to have a 40.

You mean, your denomination says. There is only one church, many denominations. One truth, many interpretations. The best church doesn't claim a denomination. You know the truth by looking at what is written. If you read about what is considered a standard lens, it says that it is the one which a focal length that matches the diagonal size of the frame area. For FF, 24x36mm, it's 43.2mm. Your church lies and you follow it because you're lazy. I will never buy an standard lens that doesn't have the exact focal length for the frame area in use. I'd rather have a zoom or a wide or a tele, but never a fake standard lens. That's me, my church, my truth. The only truth.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2018 at 02:38 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: 'Opera' doesn't sound good to my ears. 'Art' does. And 50mm is not the standard focal length for FF. 43mm is, and only Pentax has such a lens. Canon seems to have a 40.

I understand that it is probably a convention thing, but they shouldn't be 40 or 45 or 50, they should be 43, period. Isn't it the diagonal length of an FF sensor? What the heck?

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2018 at 01:23 UTC

'Opera' doesn't sound good to my ears. 'Art' does. And 50mm is not the standard focal length for FF. 43mm is, and only Pentax has such a lens. Canon seems to have a 40.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 01:53 UTC as 14th comment | 17 replies
On article Canon introduces EOS Rebel T7 with updated 24MP sensor (107 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: The price is good. Those same 549 for the kit would be equivalent to less than 499 three years ago. Not bad if we consider that at least the video quality is reasonably better than it was 3 years ago. This price can easily drop to 449 within a year.

I agree with some comments about them still using the name Rebel. It's ridiculous. It sounds like a Marxist thing, giving words other meanings, banalizing or "stupidizing" them. They could name it RTB (Rebel-To-Be) instead.

Yeah, it makes sense.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2018 at 14:32 UTC
On article Canon introduces EOS Rebel T7 with updated 24MP sensor (107 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael1000: You can get better video from a $50 cell phone.

Michael1000 Do you have the link to a video comparing the video of the latest Canon entry-level camera with a $50 phone?

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2018 at 14:28 UTC

Still not what I expect. I want a Zenit 12XP-feature-like Canon, without the monitor, fullframe, that same 12XP battle tank body. They could call it Canit or Zanon. The kit lens actually being three, an all equally-tank-like 43mm, a 31mm, and a 60mm, all of them 2.8, and called Widenon, Helionon, and Telenon, or Widanonios, Canlios, and Telanonios (respectively).

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2018 at 02:06 UTC as 61st comment

After seeing this, it makes sense to me why the effort in updating the T7 wasn't that great. Canon seems to know where to put their effort on.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2018 at 14:15 UTC as 30th comment | 1 reply
On article Canon introduces EOS Rebel T7 with updated 24MP sensor (107 comments in total)

The price is good. Those same 549 for the kit would be equivalent to less than 499 three years ago. Not bad if we consider that at least the video quality is reasonably better than it was 3 years ago. This price can easily drop to 449 within a year.

I agree with some comments about them still using the name Rebel. It's ridiculous. It sounds like a Marxist thing, giving words other meanings, banalizing or "stupidizing" them. They could name it RTB (Rebel-To-Be) instead.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2018 at 14:11 UTC as 22nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

iae aa eia: Only an ignorant person (Dems, in general) thinks that the Chinese deserve a high level of trust. China is a communist country. More than one person that I know and goes to China now and then, some of them to buy things for resale, told me that the country is closed compared even to Brazil. People don't have free access to any website as we do (even in Brazil). Things are very very different there. Just spend a little time, pay attention, and you start seeing and noticing. But remember that you rarely have access to what that country is on average, but only the most common regions for foreigners.

If Hillary had won and there were more Dems in the house, I'm not sure this was happening, which would be very unfortunate. And for people who say that they're spied by US agencies, believe me, it's less difficult to fight one of those home agencies and than Chinese ones. People are very misled thinking that Chinese companies have the level of freedom from gov't as Americans do.

Once I read a document argumenting that being a leftist means having some degree of retardation, and comments here prove that. One can't be normal by thinking that the US is as worse as China when it comes to stealing data, and that fighting companies and gov't agencies over spying practices in the US is as hard as it is in China.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 22:58 UTC
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