Charles2

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Aug 8, 2009
About me:

Enthusiast photographer.

Comments

Total: 35, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Charles2: Leica makes great lenses, and fortunately, you can get and use them in a reasonable wide-angle to short-telephoto range of focal lengths on the APS-C Fuji X-Pro 2. Thanks to the buyers of Leica cameras who provide funds so the company can develop its lenses.

I used an M8 -- which Leica produced despite it not being FF, so I have some basis of comparison. It is less of a crop factor than APS-C. Anyway, the Fuji X-Pro 2 sensor is excellent. As for the microlenses, 1) that might be a problem on Sony but I have not seen it on Fuji, and 2) the very fact that the Fuji is APS-C means the edges of a full-frame lens are not used!

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 00:50 UTC

Leica makes great lenses, and fortunately, you can get and use them in a reasonable wide-angle to short-telephoto range of focal lengths on the APS-C Fuji X-Pro 2. Thanks to the buyers of Leica cameras who provide funds so the company can develop its lenses.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 23:45 UTC as 117th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Ivar Dahl Larsen: What's the big difference from an old updated Fuji xpro1 ( could mention xpro2 also ), oh yes a full frame. The price of course and the Fuji's autofocus if you like. Blimey! The camera world is going haywire again and so are some people. It still comes down to the photographer.

The debate over the word rangefinder is sterile. The Fuji hybrid optical and electronic viewfinder provides the functionality of a rangefinder: you have framelines, hence area outside the frame, so you can compose better and you can watch for a person or dog or whatever to enter the frame.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 23:42 UTC
In reply to:

Charles2: I was able to get his Perar 21/4 for a good price. It turns out to be quite a good lens - fairly sharp and endowed with the realistic look of older lenses not corrected to the point of unbelievable accutance. It is a triplet.
Sample on a Fuji X camera, where it works fine:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/41790885@N08/30152194834/

Sorry, that is a 21/4.5.
There is a photo of it on a Fuji X-Pro2 in my gallery:
https://www.dpreview.com/galleries/6257687438/download/3577856

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 21:33 UTC

I was able to get his Perar 21/4 for a good price. It turns out to be quite a good lens - fairly sharp and endowed with the realistic look of older lenses not corrected to the point of unbelievable accutance. It is a triplet.
Sample on a Fuji X camera, where it works fine:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/41790885@N08/30152194834/

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 15:12 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
On article A comfortable fit: Panasonic Lumix GX850 overview (117 comments in total)

Panasonic GX850 107 x 65 x 33 mm (4.21 x 2.56 x 1.3 in)
Fuji X-70 113 x 64 x 44 mm (4.45 x 2.52 x 1.73 in)

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 19:09 UTC as 40th comment
On article Photokina 2016: Fujifilm Interview (115 comments in total)
In reply to:

Charles2: One of the Fuji X niche markets is people who like to shoot adapted manual focus primes. The X-Pro is a great host for them. Maybe not so many of us as there are Tokyo girls taking selfies on vacation.

A more serious question is about this exchange: Q. Some of the F2 and F2.8 lenses you’ve announced will give similar depth of field to F1.4 lenses on full-frame. At that point, what advantage is there to medium-format imaging? A. By the numbers, depth of field might be similar, but we think that the actual images look different.

How will they look different?

Many fine FF lenses work great adapted to a Fuji X camera. When you want a blurred background, you can often get it at f/2.8, even f/5.6, by arranging a large distance between subject and background relative to your camera distance from the subject.

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2016 at 17:38 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Fujifilm Interview (115 comments in total)

One of the Fuji X niche markets is people who like to shoot adapted manual focus primes. The X-Pro is a great host for them. Maybe not so many of us as there are Tokyo girls taking selfies on vacation.

A more serious question is about this exchange: Q. Some of the F2 and F2.8 lenses you’ve announced will give similar depth of field to F1.4 lenses on full-frame. At that point, what advantage is there to medium-format imaging? A. By the numbers, depth of field might be similar, but we think that the actual images look different.

How will they look different?

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2016 at 17:35 UTC as 27th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Chris: I have always found Picture Window Pro extremely usable. It is Windows, but very capable. It does not try to be like any of the others, something I found to work well for me. It managed 16bit for a long time now. It's mature, has great support and affordable.

It does depend on your background, my personal recommendation would be set yourself an actual task and try a couple, pick the one that works best for you. That's how I settled on PWP. If you feel comfortable with the tool, you'll run rings around anyone that plumped for the standard choice, but doesn't really get along with it.

Yup, PWP. If you want to see examples, almost everything in my photostream went through PWP.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2016 at 15:04 UTC

More from Rio: "Chinese women fencers were robbed and shooting team members found unauthorised payments on their credit cards. Athlete Shi Dongpeng said on Sina Weibo that his luggage - including his laptop - had been stolen in an elaborate hoax involving a distraction in which he was apparently vomited on."
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-36944741

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2016 at 19:30 UTC as 146th comment
On article Fujifilm X-Pro2 versus X-T2: Seven key differences (365 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Good start. How about an article devoted just to the hybrid viewfinder-describing, examining and show as best possible just exactly what it does. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I believe dPreview had a previous feature that stressed the wonderful hybrid viewfinder. You get the classic rangefinder advantage of seeing outside the frame. It is a great tool for refining composition. It also serves well when you wait for someone or something to enter the frame. And you see instantly with no EVF refresh when someone in the frame smiles. Better than a rangefinder, however, you can call up the EVF magnification for precise manual focus. I find it all works well for lenses from 21 mm to 60 mm.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2016 at 02:47 UTC
In reply to:

Charles2: A suggestion about terms: no photography enthusiast nor professional buys an X-Pro for snapshots. The connotation of "snapshot" is so casual that it is not really a photograph. Reportage, street shooting, yes; snapshot no (and few people use a term like "snap-shooting").
--From a happy enthusiast owner of the X-Pro cameras.

Yes, my suggestion to avoid or play down "snapshot" is merely about wording for the U.S. market.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 23:09 UTC

A suggestion about terms: no photography enthusiast nor professional buys an X-Pro for snapshots. The connotation of "snapshot" is so casual that it is not really a photograph. Reportage, street shooting, yes; snapshot no (and few people use a term like "snap-shooting").
--From a happy enthusiast owner of the X-Pro cameras.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 20:27 UTC as 82nd comment | 10 replies
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (98 comments in total)

Early on as a fan of manual focus primes for still photography, I decided to sell one on craigslist. The buyer was an independent film guy. He wanted the manual focus, and f/1.4 was heaven for him.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2016 at 18:05 UTC as 31st comment

"the [under-exposure] issue manifests when users choose ‘Center-weighted Average Metering’ or ‘Evaluative Metering.’ "

Is this exposure issue common in general when adapting a third-party lens, for example, a Zeiss M-mount lens to a Fuji X camera?

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2016 at 19:08 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply

In short, the effect is a combination of local contrast enhancement (or selective sharpening) and what is often called the soft focus technique.

Picture Window Pro, an inexpensive replacement for PS and in many ways more precise, makes a good environment for the Orton effect - which is really a general name for a variety of specific operations under the two categories above.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2016 at 05:05 UTC as 26th comment
On article Ultra-compact: Sony Cyber-shot RX1R II review (552 comments in total)

Is the lens truly a Sonnar design? I thought Sonnars had a practicable floor on focal length, longer than 35 mm FF.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2016 at 19:47 UTC as 140th comment
On article Going Pro: We interview Fujifilm execs in Tokyo (354 comments in total)

The Fuji X-Pro 2 is the first camera I pre-ordered and purchased new (after working my way through six or seven brands with purchase of used cameras, including Fuji X, over about as many years). And thanks to dPreview for pointing out the significance of the changes for selecting the focus point (good coverage of frame and the joystick for moving the focus point) that displaces focus-and-recompose.

To help APS-C, can some of their lenses have graceful falloff from in-focus to out-of-focus that rivals larger formats? Although image quality in technical terms might not require full frame, the transition effect just mentioned is attractive to many of us enthusiast photographers.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2016 at 05:36 UTC as 72nd comment
In reply to:

papa natas: I liked it.
Not enough to go and buy the camera, but guys...Thanks for not using "cool" and "sexy" about the camera's features.
Mystery question:
How do they get a British accent guy in...Seattle?

"How do they get a British accent guy in...Seattle?" I believe the the website was started and developed into maturity in Britain, then Amazon bought it and moved it to Seattle.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2016 at 18:24 UTC
On article Retro through-and-through: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review (2499 comments in total)
In reply to:

arhmatic: People should stop calling this "retro".

It has great look and it's appealing to me, but otherwise it's a square looking camera, both digital and analog controls, large screen and such... Only two elements might be considered "retro" --- dial for exposure, and maybe the optical view finder - but OVF (with pentaprism) is really everywhere in the DSLR world. So no, it's just a modern camera. Better styled one, but not "retro". It's a buy for me.

"retrogressive" or "retrospective"? :)

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2016 at 19:13 UTC
Total: 35, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »