J Parker

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Dec 12, 2008

Comments

Total: 106, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

J Parker: Look, Sony makes great cameras and I still use them all the time. But when I shot a 4 hour funeral with a Panasonic G series camera, not only did the camera record continuously, it was only slightly warm, to the point of being almost undetectable -- AFTER 4 HOURS. Incredible image quality in both videos and stills. If you want a no hassle camera that just works, the GH5 is highly under-priced for what it does.

No problem, V -- thanks for your question and comment! So many great camera choices....

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 05:23 UTC
In reply to:

J Parker: Look, Sony makes great cameras and I still use them all the time. But when I shot a 4 hour funeral with a Panasonic G series camera, not only did the camera record continuously, it was only slightly warm, to the point of being almost undetectable -- AFTER 4 HOURS. Incredible image quality in both videos and stills. If you want a no hassle camera that just works, the GH5 is highly under-priced for what it does.

Thank you for your question. Contrary to the custom of many funerals, Black church funerals tend to be joyous, uplifting, and often life changing. Characterized by world-class preaching, singing, and worship, this type of commemoration is the norm in many African American churches and communities. This was a special ceremony celebrating the life of a phenomenal person and friend.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 05:00 UTC

Look, Sony makes great cameras and I still use them all the time. But when I shot a 4 hour funeral with a Panasonic G series camera, not only did the camera record continuously, it was only slightly warm, to the point of being almost undetectable -- AFTER 4 HOURS. Incredible image quality in both videos and stills. If you want a no hassle camera that just works, the GH5 is highly under-priced for what it does.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2017 at 04:26 UTC as 9th comment | 6 replies

I went to a restaurant today and bought some soup -- but had to pay extra for the spoon....

Whether it's headphone jacks or SD cards, trust me, it's not about innovation. Like the airlines constantly creating new fees, Apple intends to maximize every square inch of their products to make them as profitable as possible. I can't imagine these types of stunts being pulled on such an extremely loyal fan base if Steve Jobs was still around.

What happened to this company that once seemed to be the only tech company that understood creatives -- and focused on making products for those who chose to march to a different drummer every once in a while?

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2016 at 23:15 UTC as 282nd comment | 5 replies
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85/G80 Review (682 comments in total)

I think Panasonic must be the most underrated camera maker out there. Although I shoot with cameras from just about every mirrorless system (and each has its advantages), I've experienced the following with the Panasonics:

1) Ridiculously good video. I was doing most of my video work with Sony's, until I shot a 4 HOUR funeral ceremony with my Panasonic -- not only did the camera record continuously without shutting off, after 4 hours it was barely even warm. Wow.

2) JPEGs are not outstanding, but still very good -- but the detail and color rendition of the RAW files are some of the best I've seen with very little post required.

3) Some very cool lesser known features. One in particular is being able to use the touch screen to create your own custom composition grid by allowing you to move the x and y axis however you want (i.e. think of your own personal rule of thirds). I don't know of any other company that has thought of that.

So many great cameras to choose from....

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2016 at 03:52 UTC as 75th comment | 1 reply
On article Throwback Thursday: Fujifilm F10 (121 comments in total)

For me, the peculiar thing about these cameras Fujifilm made in that era was that after shooting film for almost 20 years, moving to the Fujifilm cameras was a very smooth transition from film to digital. The images I got out of the S2 Pro, S3 Pro, S5100 and other Fuji compacts never made me miss film even once (which makes sense after realizing that one of Fujifilm's long time film engineers was instrumental in calibrating the color rendition for their digital cameras).

As much as I enjoy the many advantages of modern digital gear, it takes a bit of post-processing to even approach that same aesthetic with the files from most of the current cameras. It's good to see Fujifilm, Olympus, and Panasonic trying to incorporate these type of profiles (even including the option to add grain) into their most recent cameras.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2016 at 02:04 UTC as 37th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Fujifilm F10 (121 comments in total)
In reply to:

J Parker: Thanks for a great article. Please do a future piece on the truly legendary Fujifilm S2 Pro.

Once you got used to its quirks, this eccentric camera might be the greatest wedding/portrait camera of all time -- with what other camera could I have shot a wedding with a 99 cent set of AA batteries? As good as Fuji's current cameras are, the S2 Pro arguably defines the standard for beautiful color rendition, even today.

The S7000 was a great camera indeed.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2016 at 01:50 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Fujifilm F10 (121 comments in total)

Thanks for a great article. Please do a future piece on the truly legendary Fujifilm S2 Pro.

Once you got used to its quirks, this eccentric camera might be the greatest wedding/portrait camera of all time -- with what other camera could I have shot a wedding with a 99 cent set of AA batteries? As good as Fuji's current cameras are, the S2 Pro arguably defines the standard for beautiful color rendition, even today.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2016 at 23:40 UTC as 40th comment | 3 replies

After years of being skeptical, I finally tried a Lensbaby -- and several Lensbabies later I've never looked back. For both stills and video, they are worth every penny. Combine these with the art filters in most current cameras and your camera becomes an even more powerful creative tool.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 23:58 UTC as 6th comment
On article 2016 Roundups: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (190 comments in total)

Although it's a fixed lens zoom, Panasonic's LX100 would be a decent alternative to any of these cameras at a very reasonable price point (especially considering the well regarded Leica lens on this camera).

Link | Posted on Oct 3, 2016 at 23:38 UTC as 29th comment | 6 replies

OK Fujifilm, consider yourselves forgiven -- this camera, more than the X series (which is impressive in its own right) seems like the proper successor to the phenomenal
S5 Pro.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 02:54 UTC as 15th comment | 2 replies
On article Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85 (42 comments in total)

Panasonic G series cameras are outstanding -- yet so highly underrated. I once filmed a non-stop four hour event with a Panasonic G5 -- and even after four hours, it was barely warm -- no shutdowns, no 30 minute limits. From that point on, my Sony's stayed home. And I won't even mention the ability to change focus by the touch of a finger (a feature the $2000+ Sony's still lack). Many of the new cameras from other companies are just now including features in their 'pro' models that Panasonic had 5 years ago in their consumer models. As I said earlier, a very underrated camera company.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 02:36 UTC as 4th comment | 3 replies

I've been shooting weddings and portraits with Fujifilm cameras for years because of the excellent color rendition -- and then I did a portrait shoot with an Olympus, and was blown away. As good as the Fuji colors are, Olympus has achieved something special with their image processing. I look forward to this camera.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 02:41 UTC as 44th comment | 2 replies
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (341 comments in total)

Photos from this camera are ok -- depending on what you consider photography to be...

As a portrait painter, I was always amazed how when I painted a subject in a realistic manner, it would resemble a photograph when reduced in size. This is what so many digital sensors (not only the iphone, but even some dslrs as well) actually do -- they produce smooth 'paintings' at full size that resemble photographs when reduced to normal printing or web sizes. At even less than full size, so much of digital 'photography' departs from the traditional rendering accomplished by film, and certain ccd and cmos sensors. That doesn't mean the images produced are bad -- just very different from the type of images cameras have traditionally been capable of (i.e. look at an old Marilyn Monroe, Ali, or Sally Mann portrait -- I'll take the grain over today's watercolor-like images any day). It just feels strange obsessing over a camera that can't render as well as cameras from 50+ years ago....

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2016 at 03:08 UTC as 85th comment | 1 reply
On article Throwback Thursday: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-F707 (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

J Parker: One of the few digital cameras that could genuinely be considered iconic.

As they became harder to find, I bought 2 F707's and 2 F717's for about $50 each. The laser focus still blows me away, even 15 years later. If you get an IR filter, a ND filter, and some black tape to cover the infrared lamps, for literally pennies, it becomes an instant daylight infrared camera. The article failed to mention it, but the green nightshot mode pictures become much more usable when converted to grayscale, opening up creative possibilities (i.e. night macro photography without the need for an external light source).

And that lens -- still my favorite portrait lens of all time.

The ergonomics are not merely good, but border on perfection -- I've never had a camera that's felt better in the hand. You know a camera is ahead of its time when almost twenty years later, other photographers who've never seen it think it's a camera that was just released recently.

An incredible camera still.

58mm.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 18:08 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-F707 (137 comments in total)

One of the few digital cameras that could genuinely be considered iconic.

As they became harder to find, I bought 2 F707's and 2 F717's for about $50 each. The laser focus still blows me away, even 15 years later. If you get an IR filter, a ND filter, and some black tape to cover the infrared lamps, for literally pennies, it becomes an instant daylight infrared camera. The article failed to mention it, but the green nightshot mode pictures become much more usable when converted to grayscale, opening up creative possibilities (i.e. night macro photography without the need for an external light source).

And that lens -- still my favorite portrait lens of all time.

The ergonomics are not merely good, but border on perfection -- I've never had a camera that's felt better in the hand. You know a camera is ahead of its time when almost twenty years later, other photographers who've never seen it think it's a camera that was just released recently.

An incredible camera still.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 04:33 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies

Faststone Image Viewer -- very underrated, yet very capable -- and free. Don't let the lack of a price fool you though. I know of professionals who process all of their raw files, wedding, and studio work with it (it will also bridge to just about any other program such as Photoshop, Exposure, etc). Its raw conversions are based on the extremely powerful DCRaw converter which performs exceptionally well.

Another Photoshop 'alternative': you'd be surprised how capable -- and inexpensive -- an older version of Photoshop (i.e. version 7.0) is over a decade later. And they run lightning fast on any current machine. Even with these older versions, the ability to literally program and enhance Photoshop through their powerful actions mode is an extremely untapped feature that used creatively, allows one to never have to upgrade. Over the years, I've created actions that allow Photoshop to perform tricks that the current versions still don't offer....

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2016 at 22:23 UTC as 51st comment

I know this will sound crazy. I still take two S5100s to use as a backup to my S5 Pro for studio work and weddings. Even 12 years later, these 'old' Fujifilm classics deliver superior color rendition and tonal transition. (My background before photography was as a portrait painter -- where the color and tonality of skin is a very big deal and occasional obsession....).

A couple of years ago, DPReview did an interview with a Fujifilm executive who revealed that one of the engineers instrumental in developing the film stock decades ago still has significant input in the color profiles of their digital cameras. Wow.

BTW, I'm not a Fuji fanboy -- my day to day cameras are Sony, Olympus, and Panasonic mirrorless. It's just amazing that as photographers, we not only have choices with great new cameras -- but with great 'old' ones as well.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2016 at 22:58 UTC as 10th comment

Allison, thanks for posting this excellent article!

The Fujifilm S5100 was -- and still is -- an amazing camera. I still have six of these (if you can find one, you can pick one up for around $30). Simply beautiful color and film-like images. I'm constantly amazed when I compare the images to those of my 'modern' cameras.

What many don't realize is that at the time (2004), the S5100 was one of the few digital cameras marketed specifically to street photographers. Check out the article "Fujifilm's Forgotten Street Camera" on www.streetphotographyreview.com.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2016 at 18:36 UTC as 43rd comment

Thanks for the review. I shoot both Olympus and Panasonic mirrorless. Although Olympus promotes their monochrome modes much more than Panasonic does, I have been pleasantly surprised at how excellent the Panasonic ones are. In fact, although Olympus leads the way with Art Modes in general (which are actually very well done IMO), I have found the Panasonic art modes to be absolutely outstanding -- enough so that I don't hesitate to use them for professional gallery and wedding work.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 21:31 UTC as 98th comment
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