Earth Art

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jan 17, 2015

Comments

Total: 120, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Earth Art: Why exactly did Canon put so many aperture blades into this lens? The old one produced the best sun stars of any lens, although that may have a little to do with the slightly reduced flare resistance of that lens over other Canon UWA lenses.

I don't think many people were shooting the v2 16-35 for bokeh. :)

Actually, after looking at this link, I think the new sunstars are actually really nice! While they do have more rays, the new coatings really help control the flare that could creep into the older lens very easily.

http://cweb.canon.jp/ef/info/ef16-35-iii/index.html

Also, the corner sharpness comparison is very dramatic!

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2016 at 16:56 UTC

Why exactly did Canon put so many aperture blades into this lens? The old one produced the best sun stars of any lens, although that may have a little to do with the slightly reduced flare resistance of that lens over other Canon UWA lenses.

I don't think many people were shooting the v2 16-35 for bokeh. :)

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2016 at 16:43 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

TheDman: Looking forward to seeing some MTF charts.

The MTF were published by Canon. The 16-35 looks about equal to the 16-35 F4 IS wide open and stopped down, which is excellent. The 24-105 looks like a smaller increase in image quality at the wide end. I'm not good at reading those charts, though. :)

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2016 at 16:40 UTC
On article Striding Forth: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Review (2139 comments in total)
In reply to:

Earth Art: Dear DPR staff,

Are you sure your explanation of DP RAW Micro Adjustment is correct? I'm a little confused. It seems from Canon literature that it creates a data map for masking. Giving the ability to quickly sharpen only areas that are in focus.

Does it really allow for shifting focus in post? Or is there some gimmick for simulating the effect?

Thanks! IR has way more info about this feature.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2016 at 07:50 UTC
On article Striding Forth: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Review (2139 comments in total)

Dear DPR staff,

Are you sure your explanation of DP RAW Micro Adjustment is correct? I'm a little confused. It seems from Canon literature that it creates a data map for masking. Giving the ability to quickly sharpen only areas that are in focus.

Does it really allow for shifting focus in post? Or is there some gimmick for simulating the effect?

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2016 at 04:31 UTC as 517th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Earth Art: I wonder if number 8 would still qualify. Seems like there may have been some serious time of day difference between the stars and the Painted Hills. Looks like the Painted Hills were shot at twilight and the stars later at night at around midnight.

Still, nice photos. I enjoyed them. Thanks DPR.

It looks like the clouds are not lit at all, so no moon. The light is coming from the exact direction the sun would be setting. It could be a moon light on the ground for one shot right before it set, then another for the sky after it set. Which is also very possible.

I don't care myself, as it is still a neat image. I was just curios how it plays with any rules that may be in effect.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2016 at 23:53 UTC
On article 8 creative tips for shooting waterfalls (158 comments in total)
In reply to:

Earth Art: All good advice, Chris.

Some additions:
- A sturdy umbrella can be critical. I've used mine countless times to get shots that would have resulted in ruined gear from rain and spray. Speaking of which, waterfall shots on rainy days work really well for forested scenes.
- Take some water shoes and walk into the water. Many of the best compositions are going to require some wet footwork.
- Keep in mind the drowning risks involved with wearing bags and gear on your body while around water. This is one of the main ways hikers are killed out in the wilderness. Keep as much on shore as possible and leave all hip belts and extra straps undone.

I guess these are more of general tips than creative tips. Forgot that. Sorry if off topic.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2016 at 21:56 UTC
On article 8 creative tips for shooting waterfalls (158 comments in total)
In reply to:

Earth Art: All good advice, Chris.

Some additions:
- A sturdy umbrella can be critical. I've used mine countless times to get shots that would have resulted in ruined gear from rain and spray. Speaking of which, waterfall shots on rainy days work really well for forested scenes.
- Take some water shoes and walk into the water. Many of the best compositions are going to require some wet footwork.
- Keep in mind the drowning risks involved with wearing bags and gear on your body while around water. This is one of the main ways hikers are killed out in the wilderness. Keep as much on shore as possible and leave all hip belts and extra straps undone.

- Knee pads are worth their weight in gold when doing awkward low angle work.
- A waterproof kayaking sack is perfect for keeping gear safe and dry. I use a Seattle Sports dry bag that holds my actual camera bag. Keeps it all dry until the shot is ready.
- Stack ND grad filters onto the front of the lens. Move them up so only the clear area is in view, and also blocking any mist or rain from the lens. Take one of them off and wipe it down between shots or peel them away one by one as they get wet.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2016 at 17:55 UTC
On article 8 creative tips for shooting waterfalls (158 comments in total)

All good advice, Chris.

Some additions:
- A sturdy umbrella can be critical. I've used mine countless times to get shots that would have resulted in ruined gear from rain and spray. Speaking of which, waterfall shots on rainy days work really well for forested scenes.
- Take some water shoes and walk into the water. Many of the best compositions are going to require some wet footwork.
- Keep in mind the drowning risks involved with wearing bags and gear on your body while around water. This is one of the main ways hikers are killed out in the wilderness. Keep as much on shore as possible and leave all hip belts and extra straps undone.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2016 at 17:54 UTC as 52nd comment | 3 replies
On article 8 creative tips for shooting waterfalls (158 comments in total)
In reply to:

Greg VdB: That's a good introduction to waterfall photography, Chris, with beautiful pictures to boot!

My personal starting point for shutter speed selection is as follows: if there's little water coming down, expose long to maximize the visual impact of the falls, whereas if lots of water comes down, expose short enough to maintain some texture. From there, I often experiment and investigate the results directly on the lcd. One thing I found in particular is that the same falls can require vastly different shutter speeds for different focal lengths (/compositions).

Good advice. I always teach people when out learning ocean photography, that there is no "right" shutter speed. Even the masters will have to adjust a little from time to time based on focal length, distance to subject, water speed, etc.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2016 at 17:45 UTC

I wonder if number 8 would still qualify. Seems like there may have been some serious time of day difference between the stars and the Painted Hills. Looks like the Painted Hills were shot at twilight and the stars later at night at around midnight.

Still, nice photos. I enjoyed them. Thanks DPR.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2016 at 17:29 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies
On article Rock Solid: Canon 1D X Mark II Review (442 comments in total)

Great job with getting this review done and on time. I don't personally ever use any review from any site to make purchasing decisions for my gear, but I know others do, and this will be very helpful. There is a wide demographic that actually buys the 1D bodies. While most are probably wildlife and sports shooters, I see quite a few being lugged around cities and national parks as family vacation cameras and landscape photography cameras.

I've never even held a 1D camera, even though I have been shooting Canon for over 20 years. Thus I am not qualified to praise or complain about the camera or the review itself.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2016 at 14:28 UTC as 134th comment | 1 reply
On article SLIK introduces SLIK LITE tripod line (35 comments in total)

These look like nice products. It's going to be tough trying to compete with the cheap CF tripods that have flooded Amazon in the last couple of years. The technology to make the things has become exceedingly cheap, along with cheaper labor of course.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 04:40 UTC as 8th comment

Looks nice! Hope its sturdy for the weight.

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2016 at 09:54 UTC as 28th comment | 1 reply
On article Pentax K-1 real-world sample gallery (144 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nicolas Alexander Otto: Interesting shots! I would love to see some shots with the astro tracker in action though. As that might be a point of consideration for many landscapers like me.

Is the astro tracker feature going to work with UWA lenses or more on the tele end? I still don't know how it is supposed to work due to the extreme stretching of rectilinear UWA lenses. The camera would have to do some crazy morphing calculations to make sure the pixels at every part of the image stay on target for long exposures. IMO, the only way to get longer tracking times with UWA lenses is to use an actual astro tracking device, which moves the lens with it, and does not introduce any warping.

With that said, even if the astro tracker in the camera can only give an extra 10-30 seconds of exposure time, it will be well worth using on UWA lenses. That would allow dropping the ISO by up to 1 stop, which is great for astro shots.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2016 at 21:40 UTC
In reply to:

FantasticMrFox: I will take this video, save it somewhere and keep it ready to rub in the face of anyone who whines about modern digital editing as opposed to the 'true' photography done in the old days ...

Tommi, I am not quite sure what your point is, but "Photoshopped" has really become just a sort of derogatory term used to dismiss any work that may have been altered in any way. I get asked all the time by people looking at my prints, "Is that Photoshopped?". For I reply, "what does that mean?" Nearly 100% of the time, people don't even know what they mean by the word. To them it's just a word used to say, "is your photo fake and dishonest?"

I then often ask, what is more dishonest, a black and white film print with nothing done to it, or a color print from digital with some adjustments made in post?

I also point out that visual accuracy and emotional accuracy are rarely attainable at once. I often ask people, how many times have you taken a shot with your cell phone and been disappointed that the picture doesn't do the scene justice. The darkroom, both digital and analog, is the last viable step in the process for making sure the emotional accuracy of an image is retained.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 18:30 UTC
In reply to:

FantasticMrFox: I will take this video, save it somewhere and keep it ready to rub in the face of anyone who whines about modern digital editing as opposed to the 'true' photography done in the old days ...

It's funny how pretty much everything I do in Photoshop is exactly what I did before in the darkroom, but with more accuracy. I get strange looks from people when I tell them Ansel Adams "photoshopped" the living heck out of his photos and it worked great because it enhanced the emotional accuracy of a 2D array of pigments.

When I was taking film classes in high school, I would have literally failed the classes if I never did a single thing to enhance the photos in the darkroom. Dodging, burning, compositing, local/global contrast adjustments, developer chemical tricks, print toning, hand tinting, dust spot removal, stitching panoramas, and so on. The equivalent of taking your film to the automated film shop, was just the same as pretending that out of camera JPEG is somehow the purest form of photography.

HA!

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 16:08 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (802 comments in total)

What year will it be when camera companies stop using the letter "D" to let us know the product is one of those new digital doohickies? LoL

Or is the fascination with the D some sort of Freudian subplot?

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 18:16 UTC as 61st comment | 4 replies
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1173 comments in total)
In reply to:

Earth Art: Great looking camera! Seems to tick all the right boxes for a potential MF mirrorless landscape machine.

I do wonder though. Why would a larger sensor be advantageous over a small sensor camera with a faster lens? Seems like once everything is equivalent, the whole system isn't going to be much of an improvement in performance unless something is allowed to become larger.

Sorry I edited my post. But yes, I do agree that the photo style is pretty weak. I guess it may be a product of their environment, which is pretty bleak and depressing for much of the year that far north.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 16:06 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1173 comments in total)
In reply to:

Clint Dunn: How hard is it for a camera manufacturer to produce decent sample images. I mean seriously....this is the release of the most significant product Hasselblad has put out in years and these are the 8 images they chose???

It's pretty gross what Hassy thinks is "fine-art" photography. They're stuck in the old days when bland and repressed looking images were considered fine art by the snobs. Kinda the original hipster photography. :)

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 16:02 UTC
Total: 120, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »