flektogon

flektogon

Lives in Canada Ontario, Canada
Works as a retired software engineer
Joined on Jul 3, 2006

Comments

Total: 61, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Yashica is teasing a comeback to the camera market (299 comments in total)
In reply to:

dlb41: My first real, adjustable, camera was a Yashica Mat TLR that I bought in 1962. It was fun to use and took decent pictures.

I had a similar, even a little bit better TLR, the Minolta Autocord. Well, whenever I think about it, it brings me a lot of good memories. Mainly, that we were young at those old, good times...

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 17:03 UTC
In reply to:

brett nz: Interesting, I foolishly shot a solar eclipse here in nz a few years ago using my 55-300 kit lens on Pentax kx with no filters and clear skies. For some reason no damage either!

I believe you, because I still have no clue how such damage could be done. Did they expose the lenses/cameras to the sun for half an hour? Well, as no other than infrared spectrum is present in such cases (i.e. solar eclipse), so the only reasonable protection would be to use some IR filter.

Link | Posted on Sep 4, 2017 at 16:40 UTC
In reply to:

panther fan: The only question that remains is why we don't save our RAWs in a logarithmic format?

I think that logarithmic sampling of the analog signal is better approach than the "logarithmic" saving. Why? Because even the OOC JPEG files would exhibit higher DR. But again, if you care about the HDR then save your pictures as RAW and whether the resulting file is 25 or 100 MB, who cares, right?

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2017 at 15:26 UTC
In reply to:

panther fan: The only question that remains is why we don't save our RAWs in a logarithmic format?

With such logarithmic sampling for example only 10 bits would be enough to use for saving the RAW images. But this is really important only for video, as it requires tremendous amount of data to be saved. In addition, watching such "distorted" video actually matches better a "distorted" gamma (2.2) of the monitors and TVs.

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2017 at 14:17 UTC
In reply to:

panther fan: The only question that remains is why we don't save our RAWs in a logarithmic format?

Exactly! If for the video files can be used "Log gamma", why the same approach is not used for the saving still images? Very weird.

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2017 at 13:39 UTC

Hi Richard,
I (and for sure many other Pentax enthusiasts) would like to hear from you, what are your thoughts about the Ricoh/Pentax marketing. It looks like the company is in some financial troubles and the general fear is that this might lead to the Pentax demise. Well, our thoughts are just uneducated speculations, that's why your opinion would be far more appreciated.

Regards,
Peter

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 13:52 UTC as 132nd comment

Well, a good equivalent of the F100 should be not only small, nice and taking great pictures, it should have a good viewfinder as well. So I would not hesitate to add the Pentax K-S1 body combined with the Pentax DA 21mm f/3.2 AL Limited.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2017 at 20:56 UTC as 100th comment

In every case Pentax should start to look for another investor/protector. They already survived divorce with Hoya, so I trust them that they won't go away so easily.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 14:20 UTC as 24th comment | 3 replies

I am not sure why everyone is suddenly so keen on such, for a long time considered mediocre lenses. Those triplets (3/3) used to be basic, cheapest lenses during the film era. The Tessar-like (4/3) were far better lenses, but the Biotar-like (6/n) used to be far superior to everything else. Do you like the bokeh of this Trioplan? Because I don't.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 22:03 UTC as 19th comment | 8 replies

Was the video taken with the same camera? If yes, then it is an amazing photo-video tool.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 20:04 UTC as 33rd comment | 2 replies
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with the Kodak Super 8 (426 comments in total)
In reply to:

Maoby: It would go well in my small collection of 8 mm & super 8 :)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/maoby/albums/72157643466340843

Well, I still keep my Elmo 412 XL, though I haven't used it for almost 25 years. But it is such a beautiful camera...

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 21:59 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 Review (391 comments in total)
In reply to:

eno2: I find the JPG engine much, much better than Sony's but you still complain about it!

Richard, can you please inform us how the LX10's lens covers the sensor area (its corners) when set to the shortest FL? Is this as bad as in the Canon G7X case or as good as in the Sony RX100/III/IV?

Thanks,
Peter

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 19:58 UTC
In reply to:

Smitty1: Please more lenses, many more moderns lenses. And Sigma needs to get onboard too. Especially on the telephoto side where Pentax is rather thin. Pentax seems to be designing more primes but they don't provide any specific details beyond the vague roadmap.

I don't think many people in the Canikony camps want to trawl ebay or the like for old F and FA lenses. I think most would rather have a new design (reduced CA, in-lens motor, and perhaps weather sealing) with full support behind it.

As I am aware, the Tokina 12-28 mm f/4 exists only for Canon/Nikon. It's a pity, as I would buy it for my Pentax right the way. It is around 50% cheaper than the Pentax 12-24 mm lens and I believe that it's a great lens.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 22:40 UTC
On article Pentax K-70 firmware 1.10 now available (21 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cameracist: I switched to Sony after the release of a7 but still lust after the Pentax, which was the brand of choice for me before that. The K-1 and K-70 would be a great combo...

Excellent analogy. At first I thought that the right analogy would be the quartz vs. mechanical watches more like digital vs. film cameras, but no, the film cameras are really forgotten while the mechanical watches are still very popular (looking now at my Seiko 5).

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2016 at 13:50 UTC
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: What is missing here is a look at one of Canon's earlier patents this year.

This also covers such offset lenses but deals with other aspects. A dual lens system allows for offset and parallel rays

Can't post pics here, so see the diagrams at:

http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/cameras/Canon_rumours.html

Thanks for the link. Now I understand why such "heavy" aspherical microlenses are the solution.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2016 at 13:12 UTC

I think that the Leica's solution of the same problem is simpler and more elegant. Leica solution (if it is true at all) is based on not entirely direct positioning of the microlenses in front of the sensor pixels. The farther (from the center) is the sensor pixel, the relatively closer (to the center) is placed the microlens. Of course such (or Canon's) solution can work optimally only for one (wide)angle lens. However a tele-lens with a large rear lens (a retro design) would not be "happy" with such an arrangement.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2016 at 21:36 UTC as 8th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Jim Panzer: Great info and video, nice wool jersey! :) I had a question about this rolling shutter. I've seen it on other cameras, but does it only happen when you pan the camera fast, or say shooting from a window of a moving car...or does it happen as well if you have the camera on a tripod and someone goes by really fast. Will they be "rolled" as well? Thanks DP folks I love this site!

Thanks Richard for the explanation. So, I was apparently wrong. I thought that the "rolling shutter" technique is used because the consumer cameras do not use fast enough electronics to process the entire (sensor) information at once for each video frame. Well, this would not be possible if still the CCDs were used. Their entire "information" has to be processed at once. So, those older, CCD-equipped cameras do not exhibit this effect?

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2016 at 23:40 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Panzer: Great info and video, nice wool jersey! :) I had a question about this rolling shutter. I've seen it on other cameras, but does it only happen when you pan the camera fast, or say shooting from a window of a moving car...or does it happen as well if you have the camera on a tripod and someone goes by really fast. Will they be "rolled" as well? Thanks DP folks I love this site!

Well, it rally depends how the information (image) gathered on the sensor surface is read out. The "old" way only a few lines of a frame are read out, so whenever you pane or the subject moves to the side, the vertical lines start to lean to one side. But, at least Sony claims so, that their latest cameras have the entire frame read out capability - so no rolling shutter effect is visible. How this Fuji camera operates in the video mode, I have no clue.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2016 at 21:15 UTC

Well, everyone is upset with the price of Leica. But Leica has been always far more expensive. And why not? It is fully made and assembled in Europe if not in Germany. So, how can you compare its manufacturing cost with those "Japanese" cameras made/assembled in China, Vietnam and who knows where else, just not in Japan? But even the products "Made in Japan", like what at least Sony claims, are made/assembled by the "guest arbeiters" from South America.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2016 at 18:23 UTC as 305th comment | 4 replies

I believe that it doesn't have even the AF. Actually, this is "Das Leica" as it should be created from the very beginning.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2016 at 18:01 UTC as 322nd comment | 1 reply
Total: 61, showing: 1 – 20
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