DPPMetro

Works as a Photojournalist
Joined on Jan 23, 2017

Comments

Total: 321, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

JMTS: How hard would it be to just shoot down the drone?

So now solve the issue with firepower?

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 10:38 UTC

Wow, Sony is pushing it far...

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 06:27 UTC as 26th comment
On article Should I buy a Canon EOS 6D Mark II? (446 comments in total)

"The only sensible reason that I can see to replace your 5D IV with a 6D Mark II would be if you really, really need that articulating rear LCD (or GPS, for some specific reason)."

It's kind of interesting that DPR seems to downplay the need/utility of GPS built in, particularly in Canon- which might be the first choice of photojournalists. GPS is invaluable to save time and also create a nice papertrail in the era of mistrust in the media. The data gets saved into the metadata and like 5 fewer fields to enter, particularly if you're on the move during a story and batch syncing is not possible. Having the coordinates also allows editorial staff to verify a location against what might be entered into the IPTC fields, saving calls to photographers and agents, as well as streamlining the process of getting a story to publish. Having GPS coordinates means potential licensures.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 15:29 UTC as 97th comment | 1 reply

Choice is good, but when there's too much out there, then things start imploding. We an accessory industry with firms numbering in the thousands and spreading everything thin. It was about time we had a major contraction in the imaging accessory industry. Perhaps the next contraction will hit the camera bag sector because it's stunning just how many companies make pretty much the same thing. Tamrac and Gura Gear went and were absorbed into the lines of others, but that is not enough.

BTW- is F-Stop still around or are they laying low until the heat dies down?

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 06:46 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

ozturert: 1) Cost
2) Flexibility
3) Abundance of software (though software support for OS has come long way)
4) Cost
5) Flexibility
6) Abundance of...

Windows has been extremely stable for me last 7-8 years so I see no problem on that side. Plus, some PC and laptop makers build beautiful machines now, so Apple's "good" look is less of an advantage now.

Sorry Apple, I liked you but..

Win7 was pretty amazing and perfect in its day. 8 was bad, no doubt, BUT they solved that mostly with 8.1, which was somewhat orphaned and got a bad rap from 8. Once configured, the 8.1 made sense and was really great. A nice bridge between the old school PC and the new world with touch and interfaces more unified with smartphones. Furthermore, which carries over to 10, if you aren't configuring and using gestures, 8.1 and 10 will never make sense. Once you do, it's tough to go back to Win 7 pro. My desktop-laptop runs 8.1, mostly configured to be 7-like, but with the enhanced functionality. My on-the-road mini laptop runs 10 Pro. Both are very good and at the end of the day, I configure as much as possible to interface in the classic style because it's fast and streamlined.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 09:45 UTC
In reply to:

Ed Ingold: I was a committed PC user from the early 1980's until recently. The continual attacks and updates for the PC were overwhelming, along with frequent crashes and reboots. Microsoft nagware to "upgrade" to Windows 10 tipped the scale for me. I bought a 27" iMac and a 13" MacBook Pro. The Magic Pad for the iMac and touchpad on the MCB are perfect for editing and design, and of course, text and spreadsheets. I will never go back to a mouse willingly.

The Retina Display on both machines has accurate color (calibrated), and uniform intensity from corner to corner. The PC laptops I own have a very narrow angle of view, dark corners, and unreliable calibration. A few dongles (adapters) are needed to use USB, FireWire and Ethernet with the MCB Thunderbolt 3 ports, but that's no big deal. I have a couple of TB hard drives, one an SSD for field use, which scream at over 300 MB/s transfer speed.

The MS Surface Pro 4 IS a game-changer and is laying the groundwork for flipping the imaging and visual arts industries back to PC. They already have business users.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 07:39 UTC
In reply to:

simpleshot: The factor that draws me to Macs is recovery.

When Mac drives go bad, you can reinstall the OS directly from the internet. With Windows, you need to download the OS and put it in a USB drive or CD, which requires another working machine.

Go to people like Louis Rossman, who will replace it. What's funny is that many Apple users tout themselves on how green and socially conscious they are, but all that gets thrown out the window when it comes to Apple products. Making products with defective parts when you're the wealthiest company on the planet is not green. Replacing entire computers due to one surface mount component that can be replaced for 79 cents + labor is not green, but apple users gladly pay for this privilege, either as part of the upcharge during warranty, or after.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 07:38 UTC
In reply to:

Gmon750: $1,000 less for a Windows machine isn't a better deal. It's just a cheap junk laptop. Try selling it in a year and see what you get for it.

The rest of the article is just typical Apple-bait. As a software engineer, I use both Windows and Macs every day. At the end of they day when I go home, I'm on my Mac to get real work done. To even debate this never-ending contest is just not worth the effort.

Use what makes you happy. In my job, by machine is a tool that needs to get the job done and make me money. That is a Mac. Anything else is a step backwards.

"Try selling it in a year and see what you get for it."

I'm the guy that buys those nearly-new years later. Just got an older XPS with a 4th gen i7, 16gb of RAM, 256 SSD, and wireless for uploading directly from jobs for like 380 EUR. If it breaks, if I am attacked during work, robbed, whatever, I don't lose a huge amount of money. It's financed by my work and I remain in the black.

Buying Macs for photographers is like auto technicians who have to go to the tool truck and buy on credit and then a year later, they try to disappear because they are thousands in debt from spending 20k on shiny tool truck tools to impress their co-workers. Meanwhile, the really good auto techs are using whatever works and not necessarily the most expensive brands.

The thing is Mac users are spending so much time bothering people with PCs about having to switch to mac. When I am working on pics and uploading, others walk over and try to tell me I should use mac- constantly.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 07:00 UTC

I watch Louis Rossmann Mac repair videos on youtube and seeing all the designed-in failure points, low-quality parts that he can easily identify off the bat just knowing what model and when it was made, and hearing how Apple doesn't repair, but just replaces very expensive parts or swaps for a refurb (with no data returned to the customer) was enough to swear me off Mac. I use PC, others keep telling me to use Mac, but offer no valid reason. Our output out of Lightroom and other photo editors is more so separated by our styles than the platform we use. Speed is not an issue. The platform is not going to make or break you in the professional world or will not lead to you somehow being discovered as a photographer. You will not be seen as more serious about it, either. Mostly amateurs and Apple cult-types will say something because they think it makes a difference.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 06:29 UTC as 200th comment
In reply to:

simpleshot: The factor that draws me to Macs is recovery.

When Mac drives go bad, you can reinstall the OS directly from the internet. With Windows, you need to download the OS and put it in a USB drive or CD, which requires another working machine.

Recovery, also the OS is available online from Windows. They make it hard to get for some reason, but there are plenty of sites with articles that link to the locations. Typically, you get a backup disc from manufacturers for a charge or buy on ebay. This is very, very workable, and often cheap. They botched win8, but outside of that, you're good. The option to DL from the internet on a barely-working unit is nice, but it doesn't replace having the media in some form on hand.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 06:22 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: If I'm not mistaken, there is a significant part of the story no longer being discussed, particularly by DPR.

If I remember correctly, the photographer originally stated that the animal took the selfie on its own. That line is what gave it the viral push it needed. Then the crap started and then he recanted and stated he took the pic himself (because he was losing the copyright on it).

While I sympathize with him and feel he was ripped apart by ruthless parties, he made the mistake of the original claim. He could have easily said he used a remote or catch in focus, or anything. Maybe it would have had lower reach, but it's a phenomenal, timeless photo. He would have not only gotten the licensures over time, but also retained the earnings from his career.

It is very doubtful the animal took the pic itself, but the damage of the original statement was already done.

Now we lose another good photographer trying to do some good, but with poor business sense.

Do you have anything accurate to discuss about the monkey-selfie case?

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 17:54 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: If I'm not mistaken, there is a significant part of the story no longer being discussed, particularly by DPR.

If I remember correctly, the photographer originally stated that the animal took the selfie on its own. That line is what gave it the viral push it needed. Then the crap started and then he recanted and stated he took the pic himself (because he was losing the copyright on it).

While I sympathize with him and feel he was ripped apart by ruthless parties, he made the mistake of the original claim. He could have easily said he used a remote or catch in focus, or anything. Maybe it would have had lower reach, but it's a phenomenal, timeless photo. He would have not only gotten the licensures over time, but also retained the earnings from his career.

It is very doubtful the animal took the pic itself, but the damage of the original statement was already done.

Now we lose another good photographer trying to do some good, but with poor business sense.

I have to thank you for your decision.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 14:38 UTC
On article Ten ways to shake 'photographer's block' for good (89 comments in total)
In reply to:

DPPMetro: Pretty much none of this is applicable to 99% of this forum, who shoot flowers for 45 years, thinking each one of their 15,000 flower pics are special and individual, or they are too busy shooting for forum tests and to title threads "Brand X shoots yyy". So consequently, the forum is mostly just shooting test shots to justify how good their camera is, no reference to whether they are good or not.

You can like the post, which then displays an unlike button, then you can unlike it.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 09:58 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: If I'm not mistaken, there is a significant part of the story no longer being discussed, particularly by DPR.

If I remember correctly, the photographer originally stated that the animal took the selfie on its own. That line is what gave it the viral push it needed. Then the crap started and then he recanted and stated he took the pic himself (because he was losing the copyright on it).

While I sympathize with him and feel he was ripped apart by ruthless parties, he made the mistake of the original claim. He could have easily said he used a remote or catch in focus, or anything. Maybe it would have had lower reach, but it's a phenomenal, timeless photo. He would have not only gotten the licensures over time, but also retained the earnings from his career.

It is very doubtful the animal took the pic itself, but the damage of the original statement was already done.

Now we lose another good photographer trying to do some good, but with poor business sense.

Hai Zlatko,

You reinforced the statement that you are not reading properly.

"It is notable that you're suggesting he could have protected his copyright by telling a complete falsehood."

Your statement, still ignoring the fact that no one believes the photographer told the truth in claimiing the money took the selfie itself- a lie he told to give the picture viral quality. It would be the truth to have attributed the photo to himself, which was most certainly taken by him in some way, like with a remote, but he lied about that part.

I don't mean to talk to you like a child or an imbecile, if it comes across that way, but it appears you have severe reading issues and altered perceptions.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 09:37 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: If I'm not mistaken, there is a significant part of the story no longer being discussed, particularly by DPR.

If I remember correctly, the photographer originally stated that the animal took the selfie on its own. That line is what gave it the viral push it needed. Then the crap started and then he recanted and stated he took the pic himself (because he was losing the copyright on it).

While I sympathize with him and feel he was ripped apart by ruthless parties, he made the mistake of the original claim. He could have easily said he used a remote or catch in focus, or anything. Maybe it would have had lower reach, but it's a phenomenal, timeless photo. He would have not only gotten the licensures over time, but also retained the earnings from his career.

It is very doubtful the animal took the pic itself, but the damage of the original statement was already done.

Now we lose another good photographer trying to do some good, but with poor business sense.

it warms my heart when people like zlatko out themselves as people that don't read what they are responding to fully.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 06:24 UTC

If I'm not mistaken, there is a significant part of the story no longer being discussed, particularly by DPR.

If I remember correctly, the photographer originally stated that the animal took the selfie on its own. That line is what gave it the viral push it needed. Then the crap started and then he recanted and stated he took the pic himself (because he was losing the copyright on it).

While I sympathize with him and feel he was ripped apart by ruthless parties, he made the mistake of the original claim. He could have easily said he used a remote or catch in focus, or anything. Maybe it would have had lower reach, but it's a phenomenal, timeless photo. He would have not only gotten the licensures over time, but also retained the earnings from his career.

It is very doubtful the animal took the pic itself, but the damage of the original statement was already done.

Now we lose another good photographer trying to do some good, but with poor business sense.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 18:06 UTC as 201st comment | 10 replies
On article Ten ways to shake 'photographer's block' for good (89 comments in total)

Pretty much none of this is applicable to 99% of this forum, who shoot flowers for 45 years, thinking each one of their 15,000 flower pics are special and individual, or they are too busy shooting for forum tests and to title threads "Brand X shoots yyy". So consequently, the forum is mostly just shooting test shots to justify how good their camera is, no reference to whether they are good or not.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 13:06 UTC as 64th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

DPPMetro: It is obvious that any company in imaging looking to have a future would develop a large-sensor mirrorless and stick with it. So Nikon is worried about their survival and doing something about it, so they MUST develop mirrorless or die. All roadmaps lead to mirrorless sometime in the future.

For instance, Pentax has not even in inkling of mirrorless in the future and because of that, you can ascertain what you need to about the future.

Very exciting news and I bet Nikon is going give us what we all want- on sensor focus that works, along with low crop 4k, and insane high-ISO performance, plus access to great lenses.

The K-01, no matter what Pentaxians try to say, was a complete flop. They try to say it was one of the best-selling mirrorless cams of all time and other nonsense.

The major issue was that it was huge for having removed the mirrorbox and pentaprism. The next problem was that it couldn't focus with many lenses. Sometimes not at all- it would just rack back and forth. Then it was 12-bit, and people also thought they would get k-5 performance out of it (the same with the Ricoh GR), but it was disappointly a stop or more off. The visuals didn't help anyone, the lack of quality video didn't even give it a redeeming quality.

@T3: the big problem is Pentax has neglected its lenses for so long that to enter mirrorless, they would need a new line of lenses, which they need anyhow. Their DA lenses are aging and anything but modern and are slow. FAs don't focus well on contrast detect, either.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 06:58 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Willacy: They're way behind the pace, this means nothing in my opinion. Sony have the march on them already, as soon as Nikon release (if they ever do) their mirrorless Sony will just release another body shortly after and blow it out of the water.

At one time, which was not long ago, people were complaining about Sony's poor lens lineup. If you don't believe me, search this very forum and see how recent the complaints were being lobbed.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 17:35 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: It is obvious that any company in imaging looking to have a future would develop a large-sensor mirrorless and stick with it. So Nikon is worried about their survival and doing something about it, so they MUST develop mirrorless or die. All roadmaps lead to mirrorless sometime in the future.

For instance, Pentax has not even in inkling of mirrorless in the future and because of that, you can ascertain what you need to about the future.

Very exciting news and I bet Nikon is going give us what we all want- on sensor focus that works, along with low crop 4k, and insane high-ISO performance, plus access to great lenses.

Do you have anything to say about Nikon?

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 17:34 UTC
Total: 321, showing: 1 – 20
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