Joseph S Wisniewski

Lives in United States Detroit, MI, United States
Works as a Speech and sensor scientist
Has a website at http://www.swissarmyfork.com
Joined on Jul 12, 2002
About me:

I've been in love with photography for over 40 years.

My favorite form of photography is macro, and much of my gear is of my own design.

I've done professional photography on and off for over 20 years.
Taught 8 years at Midwest Photography Workshops.
Designed 3 scientific digital cameras and 6 lenses.

Author of mImage and (coming soon to the App Store and Google Play) ColorForEveryone.

Comments

Total: 680, showing: 81 – 100
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Awesome. Sony and Zeiss have once again hid behind the weasel-word "develops" and managed to evade saying who actually designs or manufacturers these lenses.

That picture sums things up perfectly: Zeiss appears to be the sticker provider.

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2015 at 20:05 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies

> we think he did a pretty good job. Maybe next time send him out with some colored pens though?

Leica charges some $2,000 extra for those B&W pens.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2015 at 22:08 UTC as 53rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Gordon W: Any bets on how long before Adobe buys this product and kills it like they've done with others before?

"FontMonger, PageMaker, GoLive just to name three off the top of my head"

The discussion was about "Adobe buys this product and kills it like they've done with others before". Now, you won't find many people as eager to rip Adobe apart as I am, but in this case, your comments are unjustified.

PageMaker was already dead when Adobe bought Aldus. Instead of keeping PageMaker competitive against rivals like Microsoft, Quark, or Xara, Aldus diverted critical resources into acquiring giant piles of crap like SuperCard.

Adobe bought them, thinking that they would be a useful starting point for their own DTP offering, but found that it really wasn't useful.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 20:58 UTC
In reply to:

Gordon W: Any bets on how long before Adobe buys this product and kills it like they've done with others before?

"FreeHand was more intuitive and far easier to use than Illustrator."

I won't get into the merits of Freehand. But your history is a bit off. Freehand was the program that nobody wanted. It's creators, Altsys, couldn't figure out how to successfully market it, and shopped it around to a bunch of other software companies. Aldus picked it up in the days when everybody who had one good product tried to pump it up into a "suite" through acquisitions (a process that invariably creates bloated crap). When Adobe acquired Aldus, the government stepped in and said "you can't look like you're competing with yourself on drawing packages" so Adobe dumped it on Macromedia.

10 years later, Adobe acquired Macromedia, tried to divest themselves of the Freehand that the government said they couldn't sell, found no buyers, and cut further development. What would you have done, that Adobe didn't do?

Would you like a list of some of the programs that Macromedia bought and dropped over the years?

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 20:30 UTC
In reply to:

maljo@inreach.com: I bought Photoshop 1.0 and have upgraded to every version until the subscription became mandatory. I'm not doing subscription.

I wonder what Adobe is thinking now.
They have very expensive software and an unpopular subscription service.
They have provided a fertile soil for competitors to flourish.

I bought Affinity Photo last night; so far I like it a lot.

> But where is IBM now?..Thanks Greg

#24 in the Fortune 500.

Well, you asked.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2015 at 23:22 UTC
In reply to:

Gordon W: Any bets on how long before Adobe buys this product and kills it like they've done with others before?

Such as?

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2015 at 23:19 UTC
On article Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses (163 comments in total)

Sorry Damien, but no.

"The Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN | A is a wideangle prime lens which offers a focal length equivalent to 45mm on Sony E-mount and 60mm on Micro Four Thirds."

That's a "normal", not a "wideangle". The definition of "normal" is a focal length approximately equal to the image circle. A 30mm is a "normal" on the 28mm diagonal sensor of the Sony E system.

Just like 40, 45, and 50mm are all "normal" on the 43.2mm image circle of full frame.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2015 at 22:58 UTC as 31st comment
In reply to:

Tape5: There's a fine line between niche and quiche

But that totally ruins the "Omelette, Prince of Denmark" joke I was setting up.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 01:25 UTC
In reply to:

Tape5: There's a fine line between niche and quiche

But Denmark has no camera companies.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2015 at 00:32 UTC
On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

iAPX: "leading the way to DSLR performance in slim handsets" lol!

Maybe it's as good as dslr from 12years ago or more?!? lol!

Yes, totally irrelevant.

The problem with your "How are you gonna cram that much information in a 1/3 sensor?" question is that there isn't "a 1/3 sensor", there are (plural) up to sixteen sensors (plural, again) and that's just warming up.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:29 UTC
On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

iAPX: "leading the way to DSLR performance in slim handsets" lol!

Maybe it's as good as dslr from 12years ago or more?!? lol!

Sensors are irrelevant, what drives system performance is the size of the aperture at given coverage angle. That's basic information theory.

Pelican and Linx cover a large area with small cameras, which, from an information theory standpoint, has the potential to match a lens with that total covered area. The problem is that P and L don't sample enough of "created" aperture's actual area for this to work well, and they don't sample it with enough points. Linx literature shows 2x2. Pelican talks of 4x4.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:12 UTC
On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Does LinX make sensors?

Nope.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:08 UTC
On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

WaltFrench: Think of the Very Large Array of multiple radio telescopes that are now state-of-the-art. Separate sensors covering a wider radius, so able—with some not-actually-horrible computations—to get the equivalent of a big sensor/lens w/o the depth that others here aptly note.

Combining the separate images is a bit trickier than for radio telescopes due to the much more challenging depth of field issues. Note that clever as Lytros was, the images never had the fine resolution that people increasingly expect from even snapshot cameras.

Radiotelescope arrays operate by correlated sampling throughout the array: phase is important in synthetic aperture imaging.

You'd need to build the camera array out of Kinect 2 style gated sensors to pull that off in an array camera. Optical telescope arrays like ROTSE don't correlate phase, they orient the scopes to different headings to simultaneously capture wider areas.

> Note that clever as Lytros was,

Lytro wasn't actually "clever". Array cameras are more clever, but they suffer from the same problem Lytro did, dramatic undersampling.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:06 UTC
On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)

Trying to figure how this is any different from Pelican Imaging and their 2x2 and 4x4 array cameras.

Linx and Pelican both have too low "fill factors", most of their array is the space between the microcameras: wasting pretty much all the potential of the idea. They are also "comb filtered", which makes image recombination incredibly difficult. They definitely can't fulfill the claims of matching the performance of a single lens the size of their arrays.

My prediction: this is going to be as unnewsworthy as Apple's PrimeSense purchase.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:00 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply

After the Triggertrap Ada kickstarter debacle, I don't have much interest in minor program updates from these guys.

How much development is going on at Triggertrap these days? How many people are left?

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2015 at 20:59 UTC as 3rd comment
Total: 680, showing: 81 – 100
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