Joseph S Wisniewski

Lives in United States Detroit, MI, United States
Works as a Speech and sensor scientist
Has a website at http://www.swissarmyfork.com
Joined on Jul 12, 2002
About me:

I've been in love with photography for over 50 years.

My favorite form of photography is macro, and much of my gear is of my own design.

I've done professional photography on and off for over 20 years.
Taught 8 years at Midwest Photography Workshops.
Designed 3 scientific digital cameras and 7 lenses.

Author of mImage and (coming soon to the App Store and Google Play) ColorForEveryone.

Comments

Total: 699, showing: 1 – 20
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You're a day late.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2019 at 00:39 UTC as 13th comment
In reply to:

Tom_A: It wouldn t surprise me if Apple would eventually build this feature into its OS, without dongle need. Still it is a cool idea!

@LongPVo that's the "wrong direction". It's the "easy" direction, because what the iPad produces, it does slowly and crudely, and the PC or Macbook has a ton of power to decompress it.

And, that's just "screen mirroring". If you want to see what a tablet (or even a phone) can do with extended screens, have a look at Samsung DeX. Hell, if you want to see where Apple should be going even just on the 12.9 inch iPad, look at DeX.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2018 at 01:52 UTC
In reply to:

LongPVo: We use this with the larger iPad Pro as client monitor during Lightroom tethered session. Works great. My gripe at the moment is it only supports horizontal orientation and not sure why put my mbp 15 fan on high.

The more pixels you render, the more power you need. I have a 15 inch MBP, and back when I had a 2.5k display plus the MBP display, the fan only kicked up when doing builds in xcode, or any time I was stupid enough to try something mathy or CAD. When I added a 4K monitor, the fan kicks constantly, even when just editing text.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2018 at 01:48 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

Arun H: What I really want is an RF to EF adapter so I can use that 50mm f/1.2 on my 5D Mark IV.

You might look into the original Canon 50mm f1.2 EF. An oldie but a...

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 01:11 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

Space the final frontier: I hope this idea is not patent protected so that it can be implemented in adapters for other systems.

I'm sure it was patent protected, a few decades back, and long expired.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 01:08 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: Just for those who think the drop-in filter is a great new invention:
Canon has had the drop-in filter design built in many of their lenses from the late 1970s and early 1980s, especially the large lenses and zooms.

It's nice that they made the EF-to-R lens adapters ready at the time of releasing the R system.

Let's see how long it will take to see them on eBay made by Chinese manufacturers for pocket change.
I have been using EF-to-E and FD-to-E adapters for a couple of years now, and quite happy with the results.
Surprisingly, my $11 adapters are proving to be far better than my $100 adapter.

@bmwzimmer It's Canon: the EF lenses already have aperture and focus motors. If the message set for the R lenses is a superset of the EF lenses, then all you need is basically a dumb extension tube. Otherwise, you need a smart extension tube with enough processing power to translate messages.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 01:07 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

bladerunner6: What are dimensions and weight of these?

How much does using adapted lenses negate the lower weight of the new camera?

@lacikuss "Just buy into M43, physics will always limit a FF system with extraordinary lenses."

It's the other way around. There's nothing M43 that can match the shallow DOF of the new 58mm f0.95 Nikkor. You would need a 116mm f0.475, and physics sort of limits you there.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 01:04 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

photomedium: The adapter with ND filter is the best new product out of this whole rather disappointing set.

The APS and 4/3 fast zooms are essentially FF designs with a speed-increasing "wide converter" rear end (like a Metabones adapter). That's why they have basically the weight and width of their FF equivalents but an increase in length.

Sigma pushes things to the limit with their f1.8 lenses. Oly is more conservative, the 14-35 Zuiko is your basic FF 28-70mm f2.8 with a 2x converter. That gave it a potential f1.4, but they went to 2.0 to narrow the optical path and increase image quality.

I don't know if the new Canon is more like a medium format 35-100 with a wide converter to 28-70 or an actual 28-70 f2, but either case is pretty ambitious.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 01:00 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bmark: I certainly like the idea of a drop-in filter and wish Nikon would offer that kind of option. Of course, it only works with glass that is not native to the new mount.

@lancet it's unknown whether the new cameras have defeatable UV/IR blockers. If you want the best performance from a mirrorless, you integrate that filtration into the sensor cover glass, so you'd have to breech the sensor to remove it. Not for the faint of heart.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:53 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

LiangMing: Sony's next camera will include ND filter inside (like the RX100 model), for free!

@Ed Ingold, the effect was negligible on telephotos. That's why they came with both glass and gel filter holders. Gelatin filters were thinner (and had a lower index of refraction) so the effect on the optical path wasn't the same as glass.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:48 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

VHS77: What about the crop to aps-c while using the adapter with EF-S lenses? Why isn't anyone mentioning it? I find that that severely limiting.

I'd like more options with the crop feature. Some lenses, especially longer ones, have good coverage past APS-C, and lenses without internal baffles can do APS-C vertical or horizontal crops within the image circle.

I want "electronic rotation".

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:46 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

CaNikonianite: Lens adapters. Just as annoying as Apple's dongles. One more thing to carry.

@Grive You beat me to it. That's basically what I was going to say.

Or I'd put it at the end of "the stack" that I usually carry: 1.4x TC, 2x TC, 8, 12, 20, 36mm extension tubes...

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:43 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

Garug: Adapter for FD lenses woud be nice, with integrated electrical aperture control.

RedFox88 "Lol, guess you’re not an engineer!"

I am an engineer. But it doesn't take an engineer to see that this is possible, because...

Nikon did it in their F to Z mount adapter.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:35 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

istscott: Outside of specification letdowns and price on the EOS R, the adapters look great. Especially that one with drop-in filters. It especially looks like an awesome tool for photographers and videographers.

kreislauf: so you want more features for less money? makes total sense.

Well, you are stripping out the mirror, along with its motion compensation system, and the heavy glass pentaprism. Theoretically, nothing that's being "added" represents that big a cost increase, so yeah, a net decrease is to be expected.

And, when projected R (and Nikon Z) sales exceed SLRs, it should happen, but right now we're paying a premium for the lower quantities, not "features".

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:33 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joseph S Wisniewski: Well, Jeff, you're close...

"Any EF lens can take advantage of the drop-in filter, with no size cost - that we could tell - compared to the standard adapter."

The drop in filter will have three effects: two on the optical path behind the lens, and one on the lens itself.

The first effect is very minor: it will lengthen the path slightly. This is fairly harmless, it means that the adapter will be lengthened by 30-40% of the thickness of the filter. Since I'm anticipating Canon using very thin (under 1mm) filter glass, the adapter will be about 0.35mm longer than a "plain air" adapter.

Another consequence of this is that you can't run the adapter without a filter in place with short lenses, the focus shift could take you outside the lens's focusing range (it will also give you near focusing abilities with ultrawides and fisheyes that could be very amusing).

Do you own polarizing sunglasses? Probably not, because modern tempered "safety glass" use in cars kinda put the kibosh on it. I have polarized Serengeti driving glasses, and they cause the whole world to be overlaid with little squares looking out the rear or side windows of my Explorer. They also let me see the stresses in everyone else's car windows, or in heavily windowed buildings.

At work, most of the windows are tempered and the glass is thicker than my car, so there's also color shifts. This can be "magical", at the right time of day all the clouds in the sky are painted in pastel rainbows.

Going back to microscopes, you pay extra for "stress free" optics so you can use your scope with polarized light. Are consumer photographic lenses "stress free"? I'm betting against it. So, the rear polarizer may treat you to interesting effects.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:30 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joseph S Wisniewski: Well, Jeff, you're close...

"Any EF lens can take advantage of the drop-in filter, with no size cost - that we could tell - compared to the standard adapter."

The drop in filter will have three effects: two on the optical path behind the lens, and one on the lens itself.

The first effect is very minor: it will lengthen the path slightly. This is fairly harmless, it means that the adapter will be lengthened by 30-40% of the thickness of the filter. Since I'm anticipating Canon using very thin (under 1mm) filter glass, the adapter will be about 0.35mm longer than a "plain air" adapter.

Another consequence of this is that you can't run the adapter without a filter in place with short lenses, the focus shift could take you outside the lens's focusing range (it will also give you near focusing abilities with ultrawides and fisheyes that could be very amusing).

The third effect has nothing to do with the optical path behind the lens and everything to do with the lens itself.

When using front polarizers, you have the optics stacked in the following order: polarized light source (the sky, a body of water with reflections, shiny lacquer, etc), the polarizer, the lens, the sensor.

So, there's really nothing to speak of between the two polarizers (the sky/water/etc and the polarizer on the lens). With a polarizer behind the lens, you have a huge amount of glass (3-25 elements) in between the polarized light source and the shooting polarizer. The stresses in each of those elements twists light (photoelasticity) so you see different angles of polarization based on stress, which means more or less "polarizing effect" (darkening of the sky, penetration of reflections of water). To make it even more fun, this is often dependent on wavelength, so bands of color form based on stress.

This is used in a device called a "polariscope" to detect stress.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:23 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joseph S Wisniewski: Well, Jeff, you're close...

"Any EF lens can take advantage of the drop-in filter, with no size cost - that we could tell - compared to the standard adapter."

The drop in filter will have three effects: two on the optical path behind the lens, and one on the lens itself.

The first effect is very minor: it will lengthen the path slightly. This is fairly harmless, it means that the adapter will be lengthened by 30-40% of the thickness of the filter. Since I'm anticipating Canon using very thin (under 1mm) filter glass, the adapter will be about 0.35mm longer than a "plain air" adapter.

Another consequence of this is that you can't run the adapter without a filter in place with short lenses, the focus shift could take you outside the lens's focusing range (it will also give you near focusing abilities with ultrawides and fisheyes that could be very amusing).

The second effect is major: the glass behind the rear element will increase spherical aberration of fast lenses: they will become softer wide open. This is why the fastest lenses of all, high performance microscope objectives, have "compensating collars" to adjust the lens's aberrations to counteract that introduced by the "cover glass" on the slide.

This is not likely to be a problem for the rotating polarizer version, as you don't frequently use polarizers in wide-open shooting. It will be a problem with the variable neutral density, as one common use of this filter is to open up fast lenses when there is "too much light" outdoors to get blurred backgrounds even at your lowest ISO setting.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:12 UTC
On article Three EF-to-RF adapters available for EOS R (294 comments in total)

Well, Jeff, you're close...

"Any EF lens can take advantage of the drop-in filter, with no size cost - that we could tell - compared to the standard adapter."

The drop in filter will have three effects: two on the optical path behind the lens, and one on the lens itself.

The first effect is very minor: it will lengthen the path slightly. This is fairly harmless, it means that the adapter will be lengthened by 30-40% of the thickness of the filter. Since I'm anticipating Canon using very thin (under 1mm) filter glass, the adapter will be about 0.35mm longer than a "plain air" adapter.

Another consequence of this is that you can't run the adapter without a filter in place with short lenses, the focus shift could take you outside the lens's focusing range (it will also give you near focusing abilities with ultrawides and fisheyes that could be very amusing).

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2018 at 00:07 UTC as 13th comment | 6 replies
On article Lytro is officially shutting down (207 comments in total)

Gone, and soon to be forgotten.

My own forecasts showed lightfield imaging not really being viable for such a long timeframe that I don't have to worry about it.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2018 at 23:03 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Lytro is officially shutting down (207 comments in total)
In reply to:

neneboricua: Most people here don't realize Lytro was ahead of it's time. Its technology could have lots of applications, even if traditional photography isn't one of them. They would have done better as a sort of "skunk works" R&D group inside Google, Microsoft, Tesla, or some other large tech company. But they were limited by needing to put out some sort of consumer product to keep the company funded. Imagine what they could have done if they could have focused just on developing that tech for a solid 10 years. Most people don't understand that 80% of the time to bring a product to market is spent on the last 20% (or less) of work to smooth out the rough edges...

@webrunner5, the lens array only needed very low resolution. It was something that could be stamped quickly.

What killed Lytro was the insane data overhead. They lowered their decimation ratio so far that the latest generation basically didn't work. You seriously need to be up over 256x to get anything useful from this technology, and we're nowhere near ready to use 256MP sensors to get 1MP images, yet.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2018 at 23:00 UTC
Total: 699, showing: 1 – 20
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