ericbowles

ericbowles

Lives in United States Atlanta, United States
Works as a photographer
Has a website at https://bowlesimages.com/
Joined on May 15, 2008
About me:

Full time professional nature photographer
Lead photo tours and workshops
Long time moderator at Nikonians
Board Member of NANPA
Board Member of GNPA

Comments

Total: 16, showing: 1 – 16
In reply to:

Dennis from Florida: I would be interested in some sort of metric .....like what percentage of the photos were correct....not just finding the eyes....

If Nikon finds the eyes more than Sony but say 80% are bad......than finding the eyes makes no sense.

Likewise what of these shots could you get with plain old Single point AF? Some of the missed shots are pretty straight forward.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2019 at 19:44 UTC
In reply to:

tzurlis: I had canon and Sony, today i shoot with a Nikon 810 only for it's nature long lenses. but i do not think that today Nikon is the money.
The Z6 and Z7 are a KIND OF A SLAP IN THE FACE FOR NIKON USERES. Just see the data: 73 papule out of 413 said here in the servay they "had it". this means 17.5% of the pepule who spend lots of money (and sometimes effort) to get there "dream camera", then lost a great deal and sold it.
For the Z6, it's only 11.9%.
(BTW, if we put it against the same rate of non- happy person from there Nikon 810, for example, based on the Jun 26, 2014 DP review we gate a rate of about 21%- but with a huge static diversion of a much longer period of years).
I'm not happy from the size and iso noise of my 810, nor its limited capability in high iso - both needed for the high after- shoot crop often needed in my hobby. i'll continue in next comment.

Do you really believe that kind of poll? We've already seen at least one manufacturer paying for negative comments and data on social media. And it was not Canon.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2019 at 19:42 UTC
In reply to:

Alan2dpreview: I can see an end user of a photograph not wanting to be bothered with future legal issues with how or when they use a stock photograph. Creating limits mean they have to keep track of every picture they use. For example, let's say you publish a travel book with stock photos. Then you revise it five years later. You'd have to go back and verify every one of hundreds of photos to see if they have to be renewed etc. This way, when they buy the rights, they can use it without any consideration. These aren't "fine art" photos but rather run of the mill shots.

Most stock photos are "run of the mill shots" rather than fine art. But it does take skill and time to create those images. The stock photo of two people talking in city environment is planned and usually staged with models and releases. Don't confuse Kodakit with non-profit entities. Kodakit is trying to make as much money as possible, so not only will they keep 80-90% of the revenue, they will still be selling those images at commercially competitive rates and under normal license terms. One year or three years down the road, they will get paid again if people use the images - or they get paid up front for that right.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2019 at 13:45 UTC
In reply to:

riknash: Its surprising that completely silent shooting didn't make it to the most important requirements. Either its assumed the camera will have it or few appreciate the value of true silent shooting and using an electronic viewfinder. As a wildlife photographer that has observed negative reactions by wildlife when they hear shutter noise or they see through the lens and mirror optics to flickering light or the eyeball of the photographer, There can be a benefit from a lack of audible and visible cues that a camera has been activated.

The Nikon D850 has limited silent shooting - and I've used it for pro golf. I do think silent shooting is important - and fast burst rate - but that's a given and exists in DSLR and mirrorless cameras.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2018 at 21:15 UTC
In reply to:

Otaraka: Are the actual pictures stored in any form by the copyright office? If so I can see why there might be a cost recovery aspect, given they have to be stored for quite some time. Given this is mostly for business interests, I can see why they'd want the most prolific users to pay the most.

Yes - they store the images. But these are very tiny image files - 500 MB limit for 750 images. In reality, a 40 kb image is plenty for registration. But they are charging 7 cents an image or more, and storage cost for 40 kb is minimal. The costs are overhead, a little processing, and mailing the certificate.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2018 at 14:09 UTC
In reply to:

Deardorff: Talk about Screwing photographers. A wedding guy with a few thousand images - $200 or more to register.
Many of us who would do quarterly registration will now have to break it up into 3-6 separate registrations.
Not a good thing for photographers with the limit on numbers!

Online only? Really a pisser with our slow connection.
And what is excell? This is making some of it more difficult with no real papers I can send in.

Roland - you clearly don't understand the event photography business or copyright law.

The cost of registration for this kind of work has increased significantly. My last registration of 4800 images for the quarter cost $55. Now that same registration will cost $385.

You do need to register your images. While all images are protected, you can't enforce your right on unregistered images. Registration provides effective proof the images are yours in most cases. Registration also entitles you to statutory damages rather than unregistered images which only support actual damages you can prove. That's a big difference.

I make about 35,000 images per year - and not all those need to be registered. But I do have about 8-10,000 images a year that are registered - the majority are events. So my annual cost is going from $220 to almost $1000.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2018 at 14:03 UTC
In reply to:

MinAZ: Best: individual copyright protection for each image. This was a big legal bugbear in the old days (i.e. right now) because you had to trade off between convenience and cost vs protection. Now you have protection without much increase in price, unless you register thousands of images in one go.
Worst: title each image? So even if they didn't impose the 750 limit, time constraints will dictate how many images you register, which is possibly the point.

Titles for each image are pretty easy with a tool like Photo Mechanic. They don't say you need unique titles.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2018 at 13:03 UTC
In reply to:

Deardorff: Talk about Screwing photographers. A wedding guy with a few thousand images - $200 or more to register.
Many of us who would do quarterly registration will now have to break it up into 3-6 separate registrations.
Not a good thing for photographers with the limit on numbers!

Online only? Really a pisser with our slow connection.
And what is excell? This is making some of it more difficult with no real papers I can send in.

Even if you only register Selects, this can add up fast. For event photography it's not unusual to have 400-600 images from a single day. In the past, all images could be submitted quarterly, but with this process, every batch of 750 images needs to be submitted and that can easily be 4-10 submissions per month at busy times of year.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2018 at 13:02 UTC
On article Nikon D850 Review (2103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aleks7: please help - how to set up the camera so it goes to sleep or some power save mode? I have it on D750 and every other camera and on D850 I can't find this settings nowhere, going through manual did not help, the camera just stays forever on. Any advice?

To save power, use Airplane Mode and turn Send to Device to Off. Airplane Mode will curtail WiFi and bluetooth. Send to Device will affect some additional processing time for each image since the camera does not go into power saving until it has confirmed there is no connection for image transfer.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 21:11 UTC
On article Nikon D850 Review (2103 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoUniverse: "Subject tracking not quite up to D5 standards"

That's not a fair point.
Then, you should add that CON to every other camera!

Perhaps a better way to look at it is to understand that there are better and best modes for a particular situation. The test of AF using 3D Mode produces more misses with the D850 than D5, but I would use Group for that scenario and not miss focus on any of the images. Why would you evaluate an AF system on one mode that is not the best option? 3D is better suited for a subject running straight or nearly straight at the camera - not zigzagging randomly. The Group mode on the D810 was new and not that accurate. On the D850 it is extremely accurate.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 18:20 UTC
On article Nikon D850 Review (2103 comments in total)
In reply to:

RixPIx56: Dear Reviewers
would you please comment in your final review of the autofocus capabilities on the suggestion by Chris Gampat (the Phoblographer) that the D850 seems to acquire focus more slowly than the D810?
Are you also able to evaluate Nikon's claim that the D850's rangefinder manual focus indicators are improved for accuracy over previous models?
Many thanks and keep up the good work.

Surely you are not serious about comparing the D810 to the D850 AF performance. I'm seeing something completely different. The D500 and D850 are far superior to the D810 AF performance with a fast moving subject.

The complicating factor in a comparison is the focus area modes work differently in these cameras. I did not like Group AF on the D810, but it is excellent on the D500 and even better on the D850. Part of the benefit of Group is that it uses closest subject priority, so with some situations I'm getting 100% of the images in sharp focus. So far I'm probably using 50% Single, 30% Group, 15% Dynamic 9 or 25, and 5% 3D. That's over about 7000 frames photographing polo, golf, landscapes, street, etc.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 17:40 UTC
On article Nikon D850 Review (2103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aleks7: Is there any test of memory card real write speeds with D850? So far I can only say that from those ~700 rapid action shots I made I didn't notice any difference when the camera switched crom XQD(Sony M series 150MB/s) to older Sandisk extreme Pro (95MB/s write speed). Of course this was partially due to larger buffer and simply because both cards were fast "enough" in those situations.

I can fill the buffer with a 95 MB/s SD card, but with XQD I never filled the buffer. It's not as fast as the D500 which has much smaller files, but I find XQD is a major positive.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 17:32 UTC
On article Nikon D850 Review (2103 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoUniverse: "Subject tracking not quite up to D5 standards"

That's not a fair point.
Then, you should add that CON to every other camera!

Most of the criticisms of AF refer to 3D. What is not mentioned is Group AF is terrific, and has a very high keeper rate. I suspect testers are over-utilizing 3D and under-utilizing Group.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 17:30 UTC
On article Nikon D850 Review (2103 comments in total)
In reply to:

racketman: Does the focus stack feature include option of a short stack finalised in camera like the Olympus cameras?

The focus shift feature simply captures the images. It's very easy to use, but a little opaque in the descriptions of settings and sensitivity. Bottom line is the camera is very quick at capturing a nice stack of images t0 be further processed in any software program desired.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 17:27 UTC

The 6D is designed for a different purpose. It's not as good as the low noise champions, but is almost exactly the same as the Nikon flagship D5 and simlar to the iDx Mark II. The design is remarkably similar - and intentional.

Once you get above ISO 500 or 640, the difference is minimal.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2017 at 13:16 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Mariano Pacifico: Is it possible the cause of the shutter problem is because Nikon outsource the manufacturing in Thailand? Lookit above. MADE-IN-THAILAND !!!

Designed in Japan made in Thailand !

The shutter is made by Nidec-Copal Corporation and manufactured in Japan. They make shutter assemblies for most camera companies.
http://www.nidec-copal.com/en-Global/product/optical/

It's certainly Nikon's problem, but any manufacturing defect seems to be at the supplier. This is the same supplier Nikon has been using for years on a wide range of cameras.

Since the shutter is being replaced, it seems that the shutter itself was defective - not the software. But that could be something as simple as a bad chip or bad controller in the shutter assembly.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 17:37 UTC
Total: 16, showing: 1 – 16