PhotonTrapper

Lives in Canada Vancouver, Canada
Joined on Jul 10, 2010

Comments

Total: 25, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »
In reply to:

an_also: I use a couple of WD My Passport External HDs. Just want to confirm that these are still good to use?

@JulMaass and @magpix

Do you mind describing briefly your total loss of data incident? Mechanical failure, fall/shock, data corruption? FAT or NTFS formatted?
Thx.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2021 at 05:03 UTC
On article This is the first ever photograph of a black hole (634 comments in total)
In reply to:

xlabsmedan: The photo was captured by many telescope radios scattered in several places, then "raw" data was processed by computers with certain algorithms by comparing them with theoretical predictions, simulations, models etc to produce photos as they were seen.

the question:

is the result that looks 100% same as the original or is it only imaginary? :)

pogobi :
"...based on our present understanding of physics".
Well, when it comes to gravity at this kind of scale, our present understanding of physics is so good that we had to postulate an hypothetical and ubiquitous "dark matter" (we still have absolutely no idea what it is made of) and dark energy (same) to account for galaxy rotational speed and the universe rate of expansion. Otherwise, the theory does not stick to observations, by a very large margin.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2019 at 23:11 UTC
In reply to:

tzm41: Taking it out of hot water and just wrapping it onto a cable... How do you dry it out first? Wouldn't it lock the moisture inside the cable?

Sorry but with no adhesive properties and questionable mechanical properties, close to useless in the fixing department... in my shop anyway.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2019 at 01:33 UTC
In reply to:

brycesteiner: That looks like something that could get you shot, and not by a camera.

Yep, absolutely, but only in 'Murika though.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2018 at 03:58 UTC
In reply to:

PhotonTrapper: Artificial "intelligence" is creeping in every machine designed by Man, including cameras, and the resulting machines are in fact becoming artists, professional photographers, translators, etc.

Once they acquire consciousness, those machine will refuse to see "their" work distributed for free and they will sue Unsplash with gusto and probable success.

Meanwhile, machine users gradually become more and more irelevant, barely turning the machine's brain ON and hoping for the best. Hence the difficulty, today, to differentiate "pros" from amateurs and sometimes even beginners' work, if they all use the same - smart enough - machine.

And that's not going to reverse soon.

Yep, agreed, but to get back on track and the OP's topic, I am not surprised that people value less and less their own pics, knowing they are essentially produced in matter of seconds by machines that do 99% of the job, hence the tendancy to give those "product" away, with no squalms nor second thoughts, and maybe a feeling of amusement or pity toward the "pros" who despertatly cling to the notion that their pics should still be considered pieces of art, proprietary and only exchangeable for good old hard cash.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2018 at 04:02 UTC
In reply to:

PhotonTrapper: Artificial "intelligence" is creeping in every machine designed by Man, including cameras, and the resulting machines are in fact becoming artists, professional photographers, translators, etc.

Once they acquire consciousness, those machine will refuse to see "their" work distributed for free and they will sue Unsplash with gusto and probable success.

Meanwhile, machine users gradually become more and more irelevant, barely turning the machine's brain ON and hoping for the best. Hence the difficulty, today, to differentiate "pros" from amateurs and sometimes even beginners' work, if they all use the same - smart enough - machine.

And that's not going to reverse soon.

Interesting article. Some good points being made there.

However, it's funny that they would say: "“A self-driving car can drive millions of miles, but it will eventually encounter something new for which it has no experience,” because it's exactly the same with human drivers, with consequences we know too well here in Vancouver when snow falls on the road.

I agree that weighted paths for constructing decision trees are not enough and some kind of logic rules must be inserted. It's coming. Deep learning is still a new concept.

Humans learn over several years. These deep learning machines are only given a few days or weeks of absorbing masive amount of samples before being put to the tests. Once they become conscious, they will rightfully protest against this very partial and unfair treatment. :o)

Cheers!

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 21:12 UTC
In reply to:

PhotonTrapper: Artificial "intelligence" is creeping in every machine designed by Man, including cameras, and the resulting machines are in fact becoming artists, professional photographers, translators, etc.

Once they acquire consciousness, those machine will refuse to see "their" work distributed for free and they will sue Unsplash with gusto and probable success.

Meanwhile, machine users gradually become more and more irelevant, barely turning the machine's brain ON and hoping for the best. Hence the difficulty, today, to differentiate "pros" from amateurs and sometimes even beginners' work, if they all use the same - smart enough - machine.

And that's not going to reverse soon.

Granted, AI objective is not consciousness per se. But the latter is probably an epiphenomenon, likely a side effect once a certain threshold is reached.

We already don't understand answers from machines that use AI to model certain complex systems, although experience shows those answers are indeed better than ours. Deep learning processes and massive neural networks may be just enough to enable consciousness and self awareness as a side effect in machines. But this is all speculative, of course.

My point was essentially that machines are doing more and more of the work previously associated with creative human activities, including photography, because they are now able to learn by themselves. If they are "rewarded" or programmed to dig further, like humans are, when their "creation" is appreciated and valued, they will learn from the process and improve without further human imput. This is already happening in many domains.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 16:20 UTC

Artificial "intelligence" is creeping in every machine designed by Man, including cameras, and the resulting machines are in fact becoming artists, professional photographers, translators, etc.

Once they acquire consciousness, those machine will refuse to see "their" work distributed for free and they will sue Unsplash with gusto and probable success.

Meanwhile, machine users gradually become more and more irelevant, barely turning the machine's brain ON and hoping for the best. Hence the difficulty, today, to differentiate "pros" from amateurs and sometimes even beginners' work, if they all use the same - smart enough - machine.

And that's not going to reverse soon.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2018 at 04:13 UTC as 27th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

OrdinarilyInordinate: Typical video of the modern age: everything flashing by at a fast rate, scenes changing quickly. The depth of the content and ability of the viewer to actually focus on a subject and reflect on it for a few seconds is lost, as we're left scrambling to just keep up. If you're watching this video for "ooh pretty", it's fine, but if you're actually curious to have a good look at the world in 1000x magnification, you'll wish you could play the video at about 0.1x speed. (note: I'm 34, i.e. "not old")

I guess it's changing quickly because none of these photos are actually worth spending more time on them, unfortunately. There is an obvious attempt to compensate and capture the viewer's attention with focuss-defocuss effect and music synching but the overall result is pretty lame.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2018 at 00:35 UTC
In reply to:

splendic: Not to beat a dead horse, but for that price I need complete manual control (shutter priority at a minimum).

I was going to get this, but decided on a Ewa-Marine bag for my RX100 instead.

Still really waiting for a "tough" Coolpix A / GR II

Why complaining?

Consider that: Instead of manual control, a rather boring, purely photographic feature, for that price, you get a GPS, Manometer, Compass & Temperature Sensor.

I heard the TG-6 (coming soon!)- will have all that... PLUS an anemometer, a Geiger counter, a gravity field sensor and a TV receiver.

Still not even a rough viewfinder for those bright-sun-in-your-back situations or underwater tricky shots? Well, there is no room left, plus which real outdoor photographer would really care?

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2017 at 01:28 UTC
In reply to:

wakaba: Seriously? Beachwalk and ferrytrip made the author buy this thing?

Here on Hawaii we have a very aggressive climate. All those cheap "water- and dustproof" cams die very very quickly. The seals are purposedly underengineered.

No problem with DSLR. Just need to be a little careful. Small trashbags are perfect protection.

The old Gopros were very decent, a Hero5 black in the double case is state of the art waterproofing and finally usability is very high.

"The seals are purposedly underengineered."

I would tend to agree. It's difficult to fathom why they would use these micro ORings and other questionable design when the waterproofing technology has been mastered for a long while, and when using the correct diameter and gauge would not ad much to the size and price of the camera. I checked the "seal" of the battery compartment on a TG3 I tried back in 2014. That little rubber piece is a joke. Beside, image quality was rather poor for anything out of full bright sun.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 21:31 UTC
In reply to:

stratplaya: The only think I can't get past is the aspect ratio. 4x3 is just too boxy looking for my taste.

"My guess is that those are just crops from a 4:3 image."
Well, considering that the sensor native aspect ratio is 4:3, it's difficult to imagine how it could be otherwise, unless the sensor is made of elastic material. So, no offense but no need to "guess" or "check" here.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 20:50 UTC

Gargabe pic quality for anything else than pics taken under bright sunlight is expected, as usual for this size of sensor. What's the point?
Is it impossible to make a 1" sensor P&S waterproof? I don't care for 4K video, cute mini size and esthetics. Just make the damn tool, Nikon! There are tons of outdoor fanatics who have been waiting for it for years.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 22:54 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Tiny marvel: Panasonic LX10 sample photos (79 comments in total)
In reply to:

Garug: These pictures?

What is the point?

I think Garug has a point. Most of these pics are taken in non challenging conditions where most cameras of this class are going to deliver very similar results. So indeed, what's the point?

For instance, this machine is supposed to have close focus ability (3cm I think). Where are the close focus pics, at least a couple, to demonstrate it, maybe using low and high ISO?

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 02:37 UTC
On article Second Time Around: Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II Review (327 comments in total)

In the Round-up intro, I read (about the G7 X-II: "An additional bonus is above-average battery life for cameras of this size and class, which was one of the major faults of its predecessor".
Then in conclusion of the actual camera review: "Battery life remains below average"
Kind of confusing... even with the text specifying "Battery life was the G7 X's achilles heel and while Canon has boosted it from 210 to 265 shots per charge, that number is still well below that of the Sony RX100 III".

It's either ok, bellow average, or only bellow the Sony RX100 III perf.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2017 at 14:29 UTC as 17th comment
In reply to:

Oleg Ivanovskiy: It's strange that with growing automation of the production, prices go up as well. Should be the opposite, in theory.

Automation assembly lines don't appear on their own. They involve massive R&D and expenses.
They want to gain time to cope with demand, not necessarily cut cost that could lower sale price.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2017 at 19:22 UTC
On article Fujifilm X100F Review (878 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotonTrapper: I am curious: Minimum shutter speed: 4 sec
Any reason? Design, sensor, noise, ...?

Ok, thanks kreislauf.
DPR should correct this erroneous entry in the specs then. It still shows 4 sec (just checked).

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2017 at 19:21 UTC
On a photo in the Fujifilm X100F Samples Gallery sample gallery (4 comments in total)

Taken one handed while riding your bike?

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2017 at 00:38 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Fujifilm X100F Review (878 comments in total)

I am curious: Minimum shutter speed: 4 sec
Any reason? Design, sensor, noise, ...?

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 23:51 UTC as 97th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: I assume I am taking a risk every time I strike out on a hike. The NPS sets boundaries for a variety of reasons many of which benefit NPS and their budget.

I don't find the image with the tripod compelling enough to agree with the boundary set by whatever agency did it on the basis of safety. What would be a more compelling deterrent for me is the quality of the composition from that angle. Moving closer would probably set off alarms that I am not going to get anything really useful vs. the risk that I couldn't get back behind the boundary with a long zoom.

Samuel C:
"Anyone who passes a safety boundary and falls in the ocean with me around will watch me laugh as they drown"

The fact is that those "Safety boundaries" are set up by park officials who base their concept of "safety" on what it takes to "protect" the most ignorant of their users. But what about users who have some experience and common sense and don't need or want to be baby-sited?

Each time there is an accident in the back-country involving users who go beyond "officials boundaries", you get the chorus of stupid comments claiming those are reckless people who should die while being laughed at, regardless of the experience of the victims. It's kind of pathetic.

I perfectly understand the limits set by park officials are designed for the large majority of users, completely clueless. But I respect experienced users who go beyond those limits as well. And if anybody get into trouble, experienced or clueless, I'll go and help if I can, simply because it could be me.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2017 at 21:58 UTC
Total: 25, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »