Irakly Shanidze

Irakly Shanidze

Lives in United States Grosse Pointe, United States
Works as a creative
Has a website at www.shanidze.com/en
Joined on May 21, 2004
About me:

I am a founder of International Academy of Photographic Arts that provides
online classes and live workshops in fine art photography ith an emphasis on creative approach and lateral thinking in the US, Canada, Western Europe and Russia.

Comments

Total: 53, showing: 1 – 20
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i saw this thing at the factory in Solms. Looks formidable.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2016 at 14:00 UTC as 8th comment
On article Photographing fireworks: The basics and then some (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

Irakly Shanidze: Simply "moving away" is not going to produce adequate results in getting city skyline, just like in the example here. The idea here is to get the skyline exposed well enough to get at least 1/3 of the attention, giving the rest two thirds to the fireworks.

The trick is to expose it for long enough to make the sky blue. Do not worry about overexposure, as the fireworks are moving, and all you get is longer traces. What you get in return is perfectly exposed fireworks and the city skyline against the lighter toned sky. Below is the example.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57981526

Gentlemen, "overexposed" first and foremost means "lost detail in highlights". So, this image is not overexposed. It was shot with a specific interior in mind and fully conforms to the technical brief.

Several bursts during the exposure is rarely a bad thing, usually it is quite opposite. This particular image has three bursts in it.

Technical info: Leica SL, Vario-Elmarit 2.8-4/90-280 APO, ISO100, F/16, 8 sec.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2016 at 21:49 UTC
On article Photographing fireworks: The basics and then some (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

108: shooting fireworks is a difficult exercise , biggest problem being you don't have that many fireworks for practice . And on a 17 mn show, better decide what to do before, tripod or handheld ( as with alpha whiskey photo post ) . With Live Composite ( or live bulb ) as on the em10 , decide when to start and when to end , not so easy .
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/9301240652/photos/3470426/arti247

Come on now, fireworks usually last for 15-20 minutes. It is enough time for practice and getting at least one killer shot.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2016 at 17:01 UTC
On article Photographing fireworks: The basics and then some (66 comments in total)

Simply "moving away" is not going to produce adequate results in getting city skyline, just like in the example here. The idea here is to get the skyline exposed well enough to get at least 1/3 of the attention, giving the rest two thirds to the fireworks.

The trick is to expose it for long enough to make the sky blue. Do not worry about overexposure, as the fireworks are moving, and all you get is longer traces. What you get in return is perfectly exposed fireworks and the city skyline against the lighter toned sky. Below is the example.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57981526

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2016 at 16:59 UTC as 10th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Irakly Shanidze: Mirrorless IS the future. It does not mean, however, that this future includes Hasselblad. With digital capture technology getting better, more and more professional photographers question necessity of medium format. Of course, sensors larger than 24x36mm and files with more than 24 megapixel resolution will still be needed for some applications, 95% of professional photographic tasks can be satisfied with means more modest than medium format.
What is more important in my humble view, is quality of lenses. Hasselblad abandoned Zeiss and Schneider, which resulted in very high image quality without character. Of course, you can use old CF lenses on H bodies, but have you tried that?
The only high-end camera manufacturer that has so far stayed true to the idea of superior optical design is Leica. It would be very interesting to see a real-life comparison between Hasselblad X1D and Leica SL, which offers a smaller sensor and better optics.

Indeed. I remember putting a bunch of 35mm slides on a light table and asking my at the time 10-year-old daughter to pick ones that she liked. Invariably, she picked Leica and sometimes Contax. She used to say that the colors were
"tasty".

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 17:06 UTC
In reply to:

jadot: Would/Could Hasselblad introduce a digital x-pan now, to bridge the gap towards a more 'enthusiast' market segment? Lots of talk about getting to a larger market - this is one way they could do it.

Precisely.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 06:00 UTC
In reply to:

jadot: Would/Could Hasselblad introduce a digital x-pan now, to bridge the gap towards a more 'enthusiast' market segment? Lots of talk about getting to a larger market - this is one way they could do it.

Of course there is. So almost in any high-end camera. However, there is a subtle difference between a native aspect ratio and a crop.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 03:20 UTC
In reply to:

Kamox: Am I the only one who reads the cautious considerations of the manager as to avoid "sales cannibalization" of the much more expensive Hasselblad reflex models?

This is the reason why they announced it as a "semi-professional" model.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 20:50 UTC
In reply to:

Godfrey: Very excited by the Hasselblad X1D and looking forward to the lens system developments. The 45 and 90 are a good start, but for me the perfect lens would be a 22mm to make the X1D into the digital equivalent of the Hasselblad SWC.

haha, for that they would need Zeiss Biogon :)

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 20:48 UTC
In reply to:

jadot: Would/Could Hasselblad introduce a digital x-pan now, to bridge the gap towards a more 'enthusiast' market segment? Lots of talk about getting to a larger market - this is one way they could do it.

I could hardly see how digital x-pan would increase the Hasselblad market share significantly enough. Besides, x-pan was made by Fuji, and yet another camera made "on the other side of the globe" would surely kill Hasselblad's reputation for good.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 17:00 UTC
In reply to:

Irakly Shanidze: Mirrorless IS the future. It does not mean, however, that this future includes Hasselblad. With digital capture technology getting better, more and more professional photographers question necessity of medium format. Of course, sensors larger than 24x36mm and files with more than 24 megapixel resolution will still be needed for some applications, 95% of professional photographic tasks can be satisfied with means more modest than medium format.
What is more important in my humble view, is quality of lenses. Hasselblad abandoned Zeiss and Schneider, which resulted in very high image quality without character. Of course, you can use old CF lenses on H bodies, but have you tried that?
The only high-end camera manufacturer that has so far stayed true to the idea of superior optical design is Leica. It would be very interesting to see a real-life comparison between Hasselblad X1D and Leica SL, which offers a smaller sensor and better optics.

Of course they would )))
The problem is, they are quite a bit more expensive to produce. Let's consider viable options :)

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 16:55 UTC

Mirrorless IS the future. It does not mean, however, that this future includes Hasselblad. With digital capture technology getting better, more and more professional photographers question necessity of medium format. Of course, sensors larger than 24x36mm and files with more than 24 megapixel resolution will still be needed for some applications, 95% of professional photographic tasks can be satisfied with means more modest than medium format.
What is more important in my humble view, is quality of lenses. Hasselblad abandoned Zeiss and Schneider, which resulted in very high image quality without character. Of course, you can use old CF lenses on H bodies, but have you tried that?
The only high-end camera manufacturer that has so far stayed true to the idea of superior optical design is Leica. It would be very interesting to see a real-life comparison between Hasselblad X1D and Leica SL, which offers a smaller sensor and better optics.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 15:52 UTC as 73rd comment | 5 replies
On article A classic reinvented? Domke Chronicle Review (116 comments in total)
In reply to:

Irakly Shanidze: Red accents and shiny stainless carbines are wonderful if you want to be more visible than you really are :)
Wax coating and plastic clips are also features that show how well-informed Domke now is about what real photographers need.

PS perhaps red zippers are for canon users to match red rings on L lenses :)

In hot climate wax tends to melt. Try to take this bag to Mexico :)

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2016 at 21:07 UTC
On article A classic reinvented? Domke Chronicle Review (116 comments in total)
In reply to:

MATiO: I personaly absolutely love this one:
http://www.kalahari.de/classic/k-22/
Kalahari Orapa k-22
Why?
Because it does not look like camera bag... I already have a second one - and I would not trade it for any other.
And what more - side pockets can comfortably hold a bottle of wine each! :-)
And here are some pictures - to see how it looks inside:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=kalahari+orapa&FORM=HDRSC2

Well.. it kinda does look like a camera bag... in fact, it looks more camerabaggish than domke )))
For me personally, the best camera bag is a light nylon drawstring backpack with an insert from Billingham Hadley Pro in it.

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2016 at 17:10 UTC
On article A classic reinvented? Domke Chronicle Review (116 comments in total)

Red accents and shiny stainless carbines are wonderful if you want to be more visible than you really are :)
Wax coating and plastic clips are also features that show how well-informed Domke now is about what real photographers need.

PS perhaps red zippers are for canon users to match red rings on L lenses :)

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2016 at 17:04 UTC as 10th comment | 5 replies
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1607 comments in total)

Another astonishing statement is that image quality of a bigger sensor stems from more light reaching it. While larger sensors indeed get more light, it is distributed upon a larger surface, and has nothing to do with how much light reaches an individual pixel. It is on a pixel level that amount of light makes a difference, as larger pixels do get more light, therefore signal to noise ratio is higher. The real reason why image quality is higher is that the larger sensor is simply capable of getting more information on it. The larger the sensor is, the less stringent requirements are put on resolving power of lenses for attaining the same resolution. The larger the sensor is, the longer are the lenses, hence they rich the same f/stops at a larger aperture diameter. This, in turn, makes diffraction a lesser problem.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 03:46 UTC as 112th comment
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1607 comments in total)

While the whole idea of an 'upgrade path' is a fallacy on its own, the logic in this text seems to be somewhat speculative to say the least. A 35mm prime works just fine as a normal lens on APS-C, and 50mm becomes a short telephoto perfectly suitable for portraits. Yes, wide angle side of a lens lineup suffers, yet this is relevant only for those addicted to super-wide perspective. A 14mm prime and/or 16-35 zoom will cover practically any photographic tasks for which a wide angle lens is required.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 03:46 UTC as 113th comment
On article Leica S2 against megapixel arms race (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

VladimirPlugnikov: Very interesting article.
But I have some questions:
Leica S2 has 37 MP, Leaf Aptus – 80 MP and, as I can see in shops, prices for these cameras also very different. So is it correct comparison?
And what about Nikon D800 ? His 36 MP more closer to Leica` 37 MP?
Thank you very much in advance for your answer

What i am comparing is results of real life practical applications. Very rarely you will need 80MP, and other things become more important for getting the best result than megapixel count.
Nikon D800 is not a medium format camera. Its sensor size despite its resolution cannot capture as much information as a larger frame of smaller resolution. It is like comparing a on-camera flash to a studio strobe.

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 23:00 UTC
On article Leica S2 against megapixel arms race (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

Phobiz: An excellent review, thanks very much, have you tried the newer S (Typ 006) yet? Would be intrigued by your findings on the newer improved(?) body.

Also, have you kept those Contax 645 lenses??? I see that there is now an adapter for the S-System which allows full use of Contax 645 lenses including Autofocus, Auto aperture etc! Looks great! And could save a packet on good old Zeiss Glass?

yes, I kept all the Contax 645AF lenses :)
haven't tried Typ 006 yet.

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 22:54 UTC
On article Leica S2 against megapixel arms race (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

EricHiss: You mentioned the 2.8 schneider lens from TLR fame but these also are available in MF SLR cameras - the Rolleiflex Hy6 Mod2 is the latest.

TLR lenses are different, they have rigid design with no moving optical elements and simpler optical formulas. It provides for optical quality superior to SLR lenses.

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 22:53 UTC
Total: 53, showing: 1 – 20
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