jb11bear

Joined on Jun 25, 2015

Comments

Total: 13, showing: 1 – 13

In 1964 Pentax rocked the SLR world with the introduction of the Spotmatic even though Pentax was not the first to market a camera with through-the-lens stopped down metering. Topcon beat them to the market by a year, but Pentax was at that time the first of the 4 major brands to do so. This camera became a huge success because at that time Pentax had the consumer base and market presence that Topcon did not have. These three interplaying factors determine success: technological innovation, a consumer base, and market presence. This is as true today just as much as it was in 1964. We shall see how Nikon, Canon, and Sony will fare as time goes on. In the mean time we can watch the Sony peanut gallery and the Nikon & Canon spoilers wrestle with each other. Those who comment here are not the market. The market consists of all those who are unaware that DPR even exists, and who buy their cameras at Costco, Amazon, Sam's Club, Best Buy, or even Walmart, etc.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2018 at 21:54 UTC as 27th comment | 1 reply

Thank-you Mistral75 for identifying this camera as a revamped Kiev 19M (1988). Kiev19M's are available on eBay from the Ukraine -- and some are claimed to be new in box. So, if you wanted a real 19M you can check it out. I'm definitely unclear about what the appeal is for the new revamped version with a new name.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2017 at 02:46 UTC as 102nd comment
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1147 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): I can't understand this hang up some seem to have about cameras of a size developed over a long time of use as found in the DSLR as being too big and bulky. I have the D500 and consider it just the right size and weight. You can have your little mirrorless, EVF, with lenses that are still as large as ever. What you end up with is an unbalanced combination that is very front heavy. I find those small bodies too light and lacking in the great ergonomics that have resulted from years of development. The D500 is a small camera to me, and I am 80 years old! I think it is one of the best buys out there, extremely capable and worthy of the praise it is getting.

What you have said is correct. The photographer can actually get a good grip on the D500, and the D750 as well, without being too heavy. They are two of the best. Most of the mirrorless cameras just don't have it when it comes to ergonomics. The new Olympus E-M1 Mark II might be alright, but I haven't gotten my hands on it yet. I can remember film cameras with motor drive that are heavier. My old Nikon F3 with motor drive is heavier and certainly harder to hold on to. If somebody wants to experience "heavy" then get a Canon EOS-1D X Mark II or a Nikon D5.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 01:14 UTC
On article Phase One 645DF+ with IQ250 field test (136 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: Dpreview which has in the past refused to test cameras it deemed outside the normal buying range of its users now tests a medium format camera that costs well into the five-figures. Instead of testing the logical choice, the Pentax 645Z?

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/1224960300/hands-on-with-the-pentax-645z

You got that right. DPREVIEW should most definitely test the 645Z.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 04:48 UTC
On article Phase One 645DF+ with IQ250 field test (136 comments in total)

I don't see the specs for the weight of this camera + the back (maybe I missed it). Only the body, 35 oz., and you refer to it as "quite a big beast without lens." The Pentax 645Z weighs 3.4 lb. with battery. For comparison a Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III weighs 3.1 lb. with battery, a Nikon D4s weighs 3 lb. and a D810 weighs 2.16 lb. with battery. So how big are these medium format "beasts" compared to the above full frame DSLRs? Of course many would consider the above DSLRs to be "big beasts" also.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 04:42 UTC as 22nd comment
On article Phase One 645DF+ with IQ250 field test (136 comments in total)

Format awareness seems to be slowly coming into clearer focus in the digital photographic world as time passes. However there are many enthusiasts who have "format confusion" even though they might deny it. In regards to speed, cost, depth of field, dynamic range, weight, ergonomics, and etc., the size of the sensor/camera is extremely important. To grossly overstate the case, a camera with a 1" sensor is going to be smaller than a medium format camera. So there seems to be this confusion: There are those who want full frame SLR's w/lenses to be the size of a 4/3 system, and those who want their 4/3 camera to capture the detail of full frame. Then there are those who somehow think that their full frame SLR or mirrorless cameras can capture the detail of medium format. Not so, and it looks like medium format is just starting to come of age.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 04:06 UTC as 24th comment
On article Phase One 645DF+ with IQ250 field test (136 comments in total)

Evidence of this coming of age of medium format is shown by the fact that Ricoh has been pleased with the sales of the 645Z and they have not been able to keep up with demand. — from DPREVIEW’s interview with Kazunobu Saiki - General Manager of the Marketing Communication Department, in the Global Marketing Division of Ricoh Imaging in "CP+ 2015 Ricoh Imaging interview - full-frame DSLR may have 'something extra built-in’ "

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 04:05 UTC as 25th comment
On article Phase One 645DF+ with IQ250 field test (136 comments in total)
In reply to:

66GTO: Now that we have seen this, would love to see a real test of the Pentax 645Z as well. It is priced so low, yet seems to be somewhat ignored.

And yes, of course, I'd like to see DPREVIEW do one also.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 02:38 UTC
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1122 comments in total)

With small full frame cameras there are ergonomic issues that larger ones don’t have since full frame longer focal length lenses, especially fast ones, are large and heavy. The size and shape of the grip of a camera combined with the height of it form the handle by which the lens is held along with the help of the left hand under the lens, or vice versa in the case of a very heavy lens.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2015 at 02:37 UTC as 41st comment | 2 replies
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1122 comments in total)

That is why in the past it has been said that a large heavy lens the size of Sony’s 70-200mm F2.8 G SSM II (almost 3 lbs) or Sony’s 70-400mm F4-5.6 G SSM II (3 lbs 5 oz) balances best on a body the size of a Canon EOS-1D Mark IV or a Nikon D3S. Some photographers or photo enthusiasts say they have no trouble holding a 300mm F2.8. Sony’s weighs 5 lbs 2.5 oz. So the question is one of how well suited is a camera the size of the 7RII for use with the larger optics whether specifically made for it or used with adapter? If I was going to use lenses the size of the above I’d want to have them mounted on a camera the size of a Nikon D800 or larger. So a lens the size of the Sony 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 G SSM II (26.5 oz) would probably be acceptable on the A7RII. My guess is that the Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS (29.7 oz) which is made specifically for the A7 series is as large as I would want to use. Now of course others may not share my opinion.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2015 at 02:36 UTC as 42nd comment
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1122 comments in total)
In reply to:

zgmi: The wild card in this race is Samsung, after NX1 lets see what they offer for their rumoured full frame. What if a traditional DSLR is launched with a back field illuminated CMOS sensor, will it be again slightly better in low light ?

So it looks like it is a good time to sit tight and wait for things to play out some, but – if I were to really tell the truth, and was flush with cash, I’d go buy both the NX1 with the appropriate lenses and a Sony 7R II plus lenses also, just to play with.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2015 at 00:02 UTC
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1122 comments in total)
In reply to:

zgmi: The wild card in this race is Samsung, after NX1 lets see what they offer for their rumoured full frame. What if a traditional DSLR is launched with a back field illuminated CMOS sensor, will it be again slightly better in low light ?

With the introduction of the NX1, regardless of whether they introduce a full frame camera or not, Samsung has given us a strong reason to believe they are not just dabbling in the camera market. Unless I missed one in their list, dpreview.com has only given 3 cameras a better overall score. Who would have expected Samsung to be the first one to produce an APS-C sized sensor that is backside illuminated? This means we shouldn’t take this company lightly because it certainly looks like they want to be a major player – and this makes people uneasy. When Sony acquired Minolta it made me uneasy. I said to myself, “Sony is a big company, big enough to give Canon and Nikon some really serious competition.” I didn’t want my brand of camera threatened by Sony. Well, Samsung is bigger than Sony.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2015 at 00:02 UTC
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1122 comments in total)
In reply to:

zgmi: The wild card in this race is Samsung, after NX1 lets see what they offer for their rumoured full frame. What if a traditional DSLR is launched with a back field illuminated CMOS sensor, will it be again slightly better in low light ?

On the Fortune Global 500 list of corporations by revenue for 2014 (http://fortune.com/global500/) you will find Wal-Mart is #1. Samsung Electronics is #13. Apple is #15. General Electric is #27. J.P. Morgan Chase is #57. Microsoft is #104. SONY is #105. Panasonic is #106. Mitsubishi Electric of which Nikon is a subsidiary is #273, and Canon is #292.

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 23:59 UTC
Total: 13, showing: 1 – 13