Martin Sadler

Joined on Nov 14, 2017

Comments

Total: 4, showing: 1 – 4
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tungsten Nordstein: Not so long ago dpreview chose to run (link to) an article critical of how Instagram is 'liking natural wonders to death'.

https://www.dpreview.com/comments/4135488301/instagram-is-liking-natural-wonders-to-death

And now here is an article promoting the photography of the Aurora Borealis or Australis. Something you really need to do by travelling (flying) into the Arctic or Antartic circles. Just what is dpreview's stance on this kind of photo-tourism?

"I lost a friend that way." Too much moon-shine, more like.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 08:11 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thermidor: Thank you for a lovely article Jose. It so happened to be that I was introduced to a Finnish photographer this week, so an opportunity to shoot in the Lapland might be possible in the near future.

May I know what are the creative options available to you if you're using a lens that isn't as wide, like say a 50mm as compared with using wide angle lenses. And what are the opportunities for shooting the auroras using a telephoto lens, for example?

Also, if you don't have faster lenses and have to shoot with an f4 lens and work at something like 10-20 seconds, how would pictures turn out differently?

Aurora photography is essentially landscape photography so you use the appropriate focal-length lens to achieve the desired field of view. In general, this means wide-angle rather than telephoto but there's nothing stopping you using a standard or telephoto - you just get a narrower field of view. Telephoto lenses tend to have smaller apertures (f/4 and above) which means longer exposures. With the narrower field of view, this means that any movement is accentuated.

Longer exposures means that motion is blurred. In general, aurora are very slow moving but occasionally there can be some rapid changes. You'll still get great shots, though - they'll just be "softer" than short(-ish) exposures.

If you have an interchangeable-lens camera (DSLR or mirror-less) I strongly recommend buying a Samyang wide-angle lens. These are available at very reasonable prices. They're manual focus and aperture but, as mentioned in this article, that's fine for any form of night-time/low-light photography .

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 07:41 UTC
On article Affinity Photo for iPad Review (96 comments in total)
In reply to:

Martin Sadler: One thing I find infuriating - I can't save an edited image back to photos. The only options are to Keynote, Numbers, or Pages. It's no good having options to save to iCloud or Dropbox, etc. when you're in a place with no/slow internet access!

OK - I finally found the answer. The "Save" option is hidden on the Export/Share menu. This then saves to Photos. Not at all obvious, and yes, I could have watched the "basic workflow video" to the end, but that's just the modern equivalent of RTFM, and no-one does that!

Link | Posted on Nov 14, 2017 at 17:53 UTC
On article Affinity Photo for iPad Review (96 comments in total)

One thing I find infuriating - I can't save an edited image back to photos. The only options are to Keynote, Numbers, or Pages. It's no good having options to save to iCloud or Dropbox, etc. when you're in a place with no/slow internet access!

Link | Posted on Nov 14, 2017 at 17:29 UTC as 9th comment | 1 reply
Total: 4, showing: 1 – 4