bjphotolabs

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Apr 12, 2011

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Total: 75, showing: 1 – 20
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The Z5 shows a low-iso dynamic range and colour advantage, even over the Z6.

Are the cameras using NEUTRAL or STANDARD profiles? That makes a difference when comparing attributes, including local sharpness, contrast, and noise. NEUTRAL is much better to use (less overall extra processing). And yes, the picture profile also strongly influences the RAW images.

Another factor that makes a difference, a substantial difference, is the lens used. Both in terms of resolution and overall image quality.

Nikon 50mm f1.8 S - 37 megapixel (DXOMark) with Z7, no data with Z6

Nikon 85mm f1.8 G - 27 MPixel with D800E, 21 Mpixel with D750, only 29 Megapixel on D850

Sony 85mm f1.8 G - rated 40 Megapixel with A7R II, 55 MPixel with Sony A7R IV, no data with A7 III

The Sigma ART 85mm f1.4 (original ART) is available in all mounts, or can be easily adapted (e.g. to Pentax). Premium lenses also capture more light in shadows, providing more editing room in images.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2020 at 15:31 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On article Sony a7R IV added to studio test scene comparison (415 comments in total)
In reply to:

MWorsdorfer: Dear DPreview, I've been meaning to comment on your test scene for some time now.
I believe it would be a lot easier to compare different sensors if you were to use the same type lens on each camera, for example a Sigma 50mm ART or the like.
As it stands now its not much use when even camera's of the same brand are tested with different lenses. The lens quality has to much input on what we are seeing.
So, how about changing this?

I agree that some standard primes should be selected. Or at least the lens rated to resolving the resolution of the sensor!

The Nikon 85mm f1.8G, which is also used on the Z7 here via the FTZ adapter, is only rated for 23 Megapixel resolution. Look at the peacock feather on the left side.

The latest Sigma ART lenses are a good choice to mount to each system.

Besides sharpness throughout the frame, there are other differences in terms of colour, light transmission, and texture (handling aberrations) as a result of what lens is used.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2019 at 22:12 UTC
On article Nikon Z 14-30mm F4 S sample gallery (233 comments in total)

Was IBIS used on these shots?

With the slower shutter speeds ( less than 1/125) and with IBIS, Electronic First Curtain Shutter should be enabled. This will result in even better detail at 100% on the Z7.

This actually high resolution DSLR, but especially mirrorless cameras. One route to deal with it is to increase latency (and this was demonstrated as being a solution for Sony), but having EFCS is arguably a better option - with no compromise to responsiveness.

It would be great if Nikon made an AUTO option for Electronic First Curtain Shutter, turning EFCS on with slow shutter speeds and IBIS, and going back to full mechanical shutter for very fast shutter speeds. For shutter speeds over 1/1000 EFCS can result in some compromise like non-uniform exposure.

However, the latest upcoming firmware for the Nikon Z-series, might handle it in a different way.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2019 at 16:11 UTC as 17th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

barrym1966: That's a lot of gear to sell when he makes the switch to sony

What about lenses? Different brands of equipment can be better in different ways

- Lens options - the most important!
- Colour output
- Image Quality at ISO 64
- High ISO resolution | High ISO grain appearance | High ISO colour loss | High ISO image editing fidelity
- The way the image edits and looks +/- 1 stop
- How much can be recovered beyond 1 stop ... up to 4 stops and how it looks
- Video processing free of artifacts
- Audio recording quality
- Flip out screen
- Stills focus tracking in low contrast scenes
- Video focusing - cinematic feel, face eye etc.
- Ruggedness/ weather sealing
- Higher Resolution for printing large / cropping / future hi res screens

Etc.

For some people they are easily settled with a system, which is ideal. Its like buying a car and falling in love with it right away. It does not mean everyone else has to drive the same car.

By the way, the Canon EOS R (and much refuted 6D Mark II by the way ) has some of the best user feedback of any camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2019 at 14:17 UTC
In reply to:

barrym1966: That's a lot of gear to sell when he makes the switch to sony

You are assuming he hasn't already tried the latest Sony equipment...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kupyLhmBLA.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2019 at 22:42 UTC
In reply to:

wasTF: In Video mode, Nikon is much better, i heard

Of course external gimbal stabilization is the best, when moving quickly, with a lot of different types of movements of large amplitude, and taking video.

With the in camera stabilization, you have to be moving very carefully or taking the footage hand held (feet relatively stationary) - with any system. That is the a common use case however, and systems should be tested based on their effectiveness for low bandwidth movement.

If doing a production with a lot of creative movement - which has jerkiness to begin with - you need a gimbal with current technology.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2019 at 16:53 UTC

I assume that full electronic shutter or EFCS was used

In the NIkon EFCS - Electronic First Curtain Shutter - should be turned on for slow shutter speeds with IBIS turned.

EFCS works so well in Nikon's , that it should be the default... up to very fast shutter speeds (e.g. over 1/500 or 1/1000 where full mechanical shutter is more effective). Or at least introduce greater latency at slow shutter speeds (e.g. 1/60 and slower) with IBIS on to avoid any - even very mild - shutter shock.

Hopefully something along these lines will be integrated in the upcoming firmware!

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2019 at 14:21 UTC as 89th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: "Plus a Fast, and very accurate autofocus, which is a combination of high-speed contrast detection autofocus and DFD technology"

Interested to see how that performs in video mode. I am not really concerned with photo AF, if it's similar to the G9 then it's enough for sports photography, it's video where the challenge comes with hunting.

Since I got the Eos R I threw all the focus pulling job to the camera and it genuinely improved my workflow, and in my experience the Z7 & A7RIII are just as good, all reliable for reall work. If this S1 is GH5-like, that'd be a big disappointment for its immense video potential. 4K 60p, V-Log, FF readout, SL class EVF, articulating screen, man that's the mirrorless we've been dying for.

@Ebrahim Saadawi. I concur with @Androole. According to feedback we are receiving from customers, the latest GH5 firmware 2.4, autofocus is reliable and fast.

Note, that the autofocus settings have some nuances as you move from one system to another.

Maybe Jordan can weigh in?

https://www.panasonic.com/global/consumer/lumix/gh5_firmware.html

I do, however, like the "look and feel" of the Canon dual pixel CMOS AF for some subjects. It seems to be non-linear in focusing speed which gives a bit of cinematic look to it.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2019 at 15:54 UTC
In reply to:

bjphotolabs: I guess when human beings loose their subtle nature, the loose their ability to see differences, or taste differences, or hear differences.

Background blur is not about how blurred the background is, but it is the showing of perception of depth, and abstraction of the background compared to the subject.

And for good lenses, that means you can make out which background elements are closer, and which are farther away. Look at the building in the background - in the Nikon image you can perceive its depth.

By the way, the Nikon image is slightly front focused, which is why the scarf on the neck is sharper than the eyes!

@thenoilif Human beings are able to tell when an orange tastes like an orange, and the difference between actual orange juice and not-from-concentrate orange juice.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2019 at 15:45 UTC
On article Nikon Z6 Review (1151 comments in total)

The Z7 / D850 sensor platform appears to be better in capturing gradual transitions form blue to green hues.

In the dpreview studio scene, the peacock feather is a good subject (top right) to see this.

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2018 at 20:53 UTC as 190th comment

I guess when human beings loose their subtle nature, the loose their ability to see differences, or taste differences, or hear differences.

Background blur is not about how blurred the background is, but it is the showing of perception of depth, and abstraction of the background compared to the subject.

And for good lenses, that means you can make out which background elements are closer, and which are farther away. Look at the building in the background - in the Nikon image you can perceive its depth.

By the way, the Nikon image is slightly front focused, which is why the scarf on the neck is sharper than the eyes!

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2018 at 14:30 UTC as 68th comment | 5 replies
On article Canon EOS R review (3209 comments in total)
In reply to:

worldaccordingtojim: BlackBerry, RCA, Zenith, Tandy, Atari, Commodore, Amiga, Nokia, Nintendo, Sega, AOL, Palm, MySpace, Kodak, make some room for Canon, they will be joining you soon.........

Blackberry just purchased another cybersecurity company for 1.4 B. FYI.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2018 at 20:50 UTC

The foliage detail looks impressive, but yes, a touch over sharpened.

Can the sharpening not be adjusted in the camera picture style - i.e. using Neutral instead of Auto/Standard ?

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2018 at 15:12 UTC as 45th comment | 1 reply

It looks like an apple, but doesn't taste like an apple.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2018 at 21:36 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

gameshoes3003: The EOS 6D Mark II is listed twice on your chart, DPR. Once right after the EOS R, and then the very last spot.
Anyway, this is pretty neat. Wish Nikon could do the same.

@evogt500 Ctrl+F5 also might work

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2018 at 21:32 UTC
On article Canon EOS R review (3209 comments in total)
In reply to:

retr01976: Ironically the 6D II sensor looks the best out of all of them.

Yes, when you need to correct more than 2 stops...

Single image HDR, working with very strong backlit scenes without fill flash, and for landscapes when bracketing is not possible or you don't have the time or a tripod ( although if bracketing is possible the computer software support to produce the best image is remarkable ).

In these cases, the 5D Mark IV, and generally cameras with higher dynamic range come to play. Although there are many other advantages of a 5D Mark IV as well..

The Canon 5DS R has low dynamic range as well, but bracket and careful editing and you have a stellar camera for landscape and architecture.. paired with a lens like the 16-35 f2.8L III. The 5Ds series is also the camera of choice for DPreview staff when testing a new high end lens from Sigma or Zeiss.

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2018 at 13:38 UTC
On article Canon EOS R review (3209 comments in total)
In reply to:

retr01976: Ironically the 6D II sensor looks the best out of all of them.

The 6D II has truly impressive colour science - from the highlights, midtones, and shadows.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2018 at 16:11 UTC
On article Canon EOS R review (3209 comments in total)

It is not only about sharpness - the lens used also relays differences in micro contrast and dynamic range especially in the shadows.

For Nikon cameras, it would be great to start using ( better yet re-shoot the current lineup with) the 105 f1.4 E instead of the lacking 85mm f1.8G. The latter also does not seem to be up to the task in resolving 36+ MP.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2018 at 14:35 UTC as 365th comment
On article Nikon Z7 Review (4412 comments in total)
In reply to:

bjphotolabs: Mirrorless cameras are known to struggle in picking up suble movement in low-contrast scenes. The Fujifilm X-T3, may up the game in this regard. In general, it is up to the algorithms and AI to do the tough work.

The key is that the on sensor phase detection, in high end mirrorless compacts, cannot match DSLR phase detection capability for high bandwidth action photography. With DSLR cameras the phase detection occurs-below-the-mirror and is completely separated from the sensor. This allows for greater design room and larger, higher quality phase detection. Plus the technology has been in gradual development for decades.

It would have taken a genius to develop the DSLR, if we only had digital photography and mirrorless cameras.

The trade offs with DSLR is that (1) careful AF Fine tuning is required, (2) the larger size and weight, and (3) the DSLR phase detectors are useless for video.

How about a D850z with the Z7 sensor and newer ZEE>ZED firmware?

@brendon1000 Actually have a lot of practical experience.

With careful micro adjustment, accuracy at large apertures, even f1.2, is perfect in DSLR cameras. I have calibrated hundreds of cameras.

Eye AF is algorithmic, and the eye/face needs to be well lit. Digital SLR cameras, like the D850, are starting to incorporate similar technology, but may actually be more effective in low-contrast situations.

Finally, it in telling in the sample picture/link, that the mirrorless array is on a golfer, and the DSLR array is overlayed on a sprinter. Plus it is not the main point in this thread, as with live view CDAF you have literally millions of points to work with.

The main point, is that the engineering room to optimize DSLR PDAF sensors is greater that the engineering room to optimize on-sensor microlens focusing technology.

Not all DSLR cameras encorporate the latest and best in DSLR PDAF technology...

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2018 at 23:09 UTC
On article Nikon Z7 Review (4412 comments in total)
In reply to:

bjphotolabs: Mirrorless cameras are known to struggle in picking up suble movement in low-contrast scenes. The Fujifilm X-T3, may up the game in this regard. In general, it is up to the algorithms and AI to do the tough work.

The key is that the on sensor phase detection, in high end mirrorless compacts, cannot match DSLR phase detection capability for high bandwidth action photography. With DSLR cameras the phase detection occurs-below-the-mirror and is completely separated from the sensor. This allows for greater design room and larger, higher quality phase detection. Plus the technology has been in gradual development for decades.

It would have taken a genius to develop the DSLR, if we only had digital photography and mirrorless cameras.

The trade offs with DSLR is that (1) careful AF Fine tuning is required, (2) the larger size and weight, and (3) the DSLR phase detectors are useless for video.

How about a D850z with the Z7 sensor and newer ZEE>ZED firmware?

@Saaaaaaad (yes I counted the a) Also in the article,

Mirrorless - Use Micro Lenses~ i.e. pixel pitch of the sensor.
" The microlenses above certain pixel wells on the sensor are aimed at a slight angle to one side or the other, .... when paired with another adjacent pixel well aimed at the other side of the camera, it allows them to function as part of a phase detection AF array. "

DSLR - larger area phase detection array below mirror

"One of the ways to make AF elements more sensitive is to make them larger. The wider the distance between the two micro-lenses that split the light coming into the focus array, the more sensitive the AF system can be. The longer each line in the focus array is, the more accurate it can be. "

There simply is more design room in the DSLR phase detection arrays.

A stacked sensor design allows a faster read out, which is great from a data and algorithmic point of view, but does not help the "physical size of the micro-lenses".

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2018 at 16:06 UTC
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