deep7

Lives in New Zealand (Aotearoa) New Zealand (Aotearoa)
Works as a writer/photographer/ecologist
Has a website at deeppics.com
Joined on May 10, 2008
About me:

God makes it, I see it and photograph it. Sometimes that works well!

Comments

Total: 974, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Fujifilm GFX 50S Review: Modern MF (898 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: "Image quality compared to full frame"???
What, are the Fuji images cropped? They're not full frame? Does language mean anything any more?
You guys have drunk the marketing Kool-Aid: 35mm is not "full frame". Any image that's not cropped AFTER capture is "full frame". Duh.
The section should be titled "Image quality compared to 35mm." Sheesh.

"Overly pedantic party-poopers" tend to be right, so there's a complement!

Every time - and I mean every time - I see someone use the term to generically describe one particular format, my immediate thought is "that's stupid". So the compliment is not returned, sorry.

Rishi calling people pedantic, on the other hand, is simply the pot calling the kettle black. Nice one.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 20:58 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S Review: Modern MF (898 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: "Image quality compared to full frame"???
What, are the Fuji images cropped? They're not full frame? Does language mean anything any more?
You guys have drunk the marketing Kool-Aid: 35mm is not "full frame". Any image that's not cropped AFTER capture is "full frame". Duh.
The section should be titled "Image quality compared to 35mm." Sheesh.

Well said! It's such a ridiculous term (when used like this) and does much more harm than good.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 03:57 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S Review: Modern MF (898 comments in total)

Interesting review, thanks. I just want to comment about the weird allusion to "retro" styling. It's just functional, not old-fashioned! In fact, it is in the style of most of the latest, up-to-date fake-SLR-style cameras. Why not call a Canon 1DX retro? That is a much older design...

Also, I find the thing about "slow" lenses very strange. F2.8-4 on that format is going to be hard enough to use if you want anything in focus. There will be no problem getting subject isolation and the backgrounds on sample images I have seen are pretty high quality. For the sort of use where image quality rules (i.e. the sorts of images that justify this kind of camera, shot by mature photographers), the current and promised lenses will be excellent.

Personally, I am saving for the much smaller Hasselblad but I expect Fuji to sell an awful lot of these. Looks like a fantastic system.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2017 at 21:56 UTC as 95th comment
On article Hasselblad X1D-50c First Impressions Review (316 comments in total)

This camera appeals so much! It's not that I have a real use for it but the very idea of it makes me want one anyway. Maybe in a couple of years when the lens range is bigger and the inevitable early issues get sorted. I just want to congratulate them on bringing such a neat concept to life.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2017 at 06:44 UTC as 38th comment
In reply to:

deep7: Brilliant concept. I hope they do really well with these.

There are plenty of ignorant people here, just like many other places. The people who will buy and/or use these lenses are less ignorant and, at a safe guess, I'd imagine would be doing better things with their lives than reading dumb comments here!

Which is, really, a pretty sad reflection on my own life...

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2017 at 21:21 UTC

Brilliant concept. I hope they do really well with these.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 22:09 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

deep7: All well and good and congratulations to the manufacturers. However, you still have to tell the camera what your subject is and, for most of us, bang, that's the photo taken already. It's not an over-rated feature but it is one who's importance is over-rated on this site. Personally, if someone brought back eye-control auto-focus I'd be much happier! Best autofocus system ever.

After reading yet another subject-tracking article a while ago, I got out my EM1 to see if it had it. Yup, it does, and it followed my dog around the lawn perfectly. I forget now where that setting is...

It's worse if it introduces another unnecessary step or another possible point of focus error, obviously.

Eye control autofocus needed a (very) small degree of understanding. All it really did was activate a particular focus point, just like a trackpad/joystick/whatever. The fact it did that in the fastest way ever devised was what made it so devastatingly fast. You also had to calibrate it to your eye. That was always clear in the instructions! When you did, it was totally accurate.

Generally, we use the viewfinder to look at the subject, duh. Note the eye-control didn't select a new point once focus was locked, just like any other system. In this case, you framed, checked your subject was just right and shot. No drama, super quick, always accurate.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 20:34 UTC
In reply to:

veliev: To all of you, who are unhappy with the limited zoom range I say this - I would love this camera even more if it had faster 35mm equivalent lens.

Even better if that lens had was a 45-50mm EFL!

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2017 at 18:47 UTC

I didn't even know that FD 150-600 existed! My bank account is so grateful for that...

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 19:45 UTC as 77th comment
In reply to:

qj-chaser: Over the decades since 1977 I owned and used most of the canon lenses relentlessly all over the world - probably my favourite was the 70-200 f4L IS BUT 2 years ago I sold all my Canon gear - 3 bodies (5D Mk111 x 2 and 1Ds MkII) and all the lenses - why:-

1. Too heavy
2. Olympus lenses are simply MUCH better - try the 40-150mm f2.8 (80-300 equivalent). I've done back to back tests with two friends who shoot with Canon 100-400 IS zooms and gone home and printed all 3 shots of the same scene to A3 (on a Canon 9500) and blindly all felt the Olympus on the old EM1 was better.

3. The Olympus 7-14mm f2.8 - an amazing lens. Their 12-40 f2.8 - superb against Canon's 24-70 and with longer reach.

4. Prime lenses - the Olympus 75mm f1.8, light as a feather and blows the Canon 135mm f2 out of the water in day to day use.

So yes they made great lenses BUT they also made mediocre ones (24-105 f4 - aaargh what an irritating lens with vignetting as a feature).

I also sold off all my Canon gear to move to Olympus. I had good reasons (mainly to do with autofocus and lens choice) but still have a soft spot for Canon. I did have some wonderful Canon lenses over the years but it's true that Olympus lenses can be a shade better, probably because they need to make fewer compromises.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 19:42 UTC

All well and good and congratulations to the manufacturers. However, you still have to tell the camera what your subject is and, for most of us, bang, that's the photo taken already. It's not an over-rated feature but it is one who's importance is over-rated on this site. Personally, if someone brought back eye-control auto-focus I'd be much happier! Best autofocus system ever.

After reading yet another subject-tracking article a while ago, I got out my EM1 to see if it had it. Yup, it does, and it followed my dog around the lawn perfectly. I forget now where that setting is...

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 22:36 UTC as 38th comment | 3 replies
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (891 comments in total)

It was nice of you people to put up a poll, except it's broken. I keep getting this message: "Sorry, there has been an unexpected error while casting your vote. Please reload the current page, and try again."

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 20:18 UTC as 97th comment | 2 replies
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S Review: Modern MF (898 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sid911: Why didn't Fuji use X-Trans sensor in this body?

Too much processing needed, apparently.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 19:53 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (891 comments in total)

Basically, my mind doesn't register a difference unless it's a really bad EVF or a really dim OVF. I'll frame a scene with what I have and the best of either is very accurate.

I've used both with equal ease. For that reason, the EVF has to be better because it brings the massive advantages of showing me the effect of my exposure settings and being vastly easier to nail focus with. To me, the optical viewfinder is a dinosaur and I never want to go back (while acknowledging that the best of them are wonderful things!).

I'll also make the point that having either is way, way better than having no viewfinder at all. I just refuse to buy a camera without a built-in viewfinder any more.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2017 at 20:43 UTC as 238th comment
In reply to:

Ben Herrmann: I first jumped aboard the FT bandwagon with the release of the E-1 back in 2004 - and I still maintain 2 of them (can't seem to part with either one). Although ancient by today's standards, the ergonomics and the feel of the E-1 in hand can make you smile.

I recommend looking for a good E-1 on eBay (very inexpensive now-a-days) and give it a try. The first thing you will notice is how it feels in the hands - perhaps one of the finest form factors ever devised for a camera - and then the gorgeous Kodak color tonality.

And I've found that to make non-stabilized FT cameras even better is to attach one of those gorgeous Panny-Leica Vario zoom lenses on them. I've attached Leica Vario lenses to all of my non-stabilized Four Thirds cameras and the IQ results are stunning.

So even though this genre may now be "kaput," for many of us who still maintain these older models, we are still smiling as we see the results.

Plus the two Leica 14-50 lenses (one fast, one slow). There was also a Leica 25mm/f1.4 prime which I would dearly love to find. All in standard 4/3 mount.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 09:18 UTC
In reply to:

Jesper Hansen: Seeing the E-1 first time was a bit of a love story it had literally a grip (*Gvipp in Loks terms) that fitted my hand as if it was made to measure. The whole button placement the weight and feel of true pro grade camera just made me have to have one..... 5 years later.

That's exactly how my E20 feels. Ergonomically, they are not too far apart.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 09:09 UTC
In reply to:

zakk9: Some of the best lenses aver were made for this system. I've been using the PL 14-50mm f/2.8-3.5 extensively both on the L1 and on assorted m4/3 cameras. It really, really shines on the E-M1, and it's still a zoom lens that it's hard to beat for depth, bokeh, colours and contrast.

It's a fabulous lens! The "look" it produces is so special.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 09:03 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: i wanted the dmc L1 lumix so badly back in the day .... yes its still beautiful

I lusted after it too, for around a decade. Then I got lucky and a friend gave me one, mint and boxed but without the matched lens. Then I got super lucky and bought an E620 with a collection of lenses, including the Leica 14-50/2.8-3.5 - I sold off everything piecemeal and kept that lens plus two other little gems (25mm pancake and 35mm macro). The L1 still is beautiful, really just like when it was new. Plus the modern software means the images are miles better now than they were when it was new!

They sometimes come up for sale but people seem to ask too much for them. I don't see many change hands.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 09:02 UTC
In reply to:

StephanBG: With all this EVF bashing, refreshing how Canikon FF owners want to protect their superiority. But you feel it, you're no longer top dog with your small sensors.

Funny. That cold day might come sooner than you think as your choices start to disappear. You do sound like a young dog who can't be taught new tricks. I moved to EVFs in my fifties and am reaping the rewards of a mind still open to change!

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 22:22 UTC

A slow, graceful end to a game-changing system. Inevitable, though.

4/3 gear served me well for a long time, particularly the four years during which an E3 was my mainstay for weddings and nature photography. It still looked like new when I sold it - great build quality. My E300 produced what remains my most commercially successful image and the "Kodak colours" really helped there. A while ago I found a mint L1 and that gives me so much pleasure still. The L1 was very expensive for a reason. It also feels quite luxurious! Modern processing has given it a new lease on life as I find the RAW files lovely to work on now.

Having said that, it's clear that 4/3 was competing in the wrong market - enthusiasts and professionals do lean towards larger sensors, whether they actually need them or not. Micro 4/3 is a much clearer niche and my EM1 is a very good, though unexciting camera. EVF all the way from here on!

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 22:15 UTC as 107th comment
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