deep7

Lives in New Zealand (Aotearoa) New Zealand (Aotearoa)
Works as a writer/photographer/ecologist
Has a website at deeppics.com
Joined on May 10, 2008
About me:

God makes it, I see it and photograph it. Sometimes that works well!

Comments

Total: 1055, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Leica TL2 first impressions (361 comments in total)
In reply to:

tedolf: I can't see why anyone would buy one of these over a m4/3 camera.

Tedolph

You'd probably match every lens in the range with something as good from Olympus, so that's not the reason. The design would be a good reason and pixel-peeping image quality could be decently better?

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2017 at 04:20 UTC
In reply to:

danredwing: Whatever your preference, it is foolish to claim that Apple doesn't deserve majority credit for the rise of the smartphone and the (almost) demise of the point and shoot camera market.

Ideas mean nothing, execution is everything. Though the iPhone wasn't the first device of its kind, it was the first that the masses wanted to use. I owned a Window's Pocket PC and a Palm Pilot, but the average person didn't

Simply put, with the iPhone, Apple combined marketing and a mix of features and ease of use that was attractive to the mass market. Yes, there have been technically more-capable devices along the way, but none has set the bar for features and design like the iPhone.

In addition, every glass front and plastic/metal back phone owes its basic design to the original iPhone. Remember that the first Android phone the G1 was a Blackberry-like clone in its design all the way up until the unveiling of the iPhone when Google rapidly redesigned the entire physical form of the phone.

No no no! The masses REALLY wanted it like nothing before. How could you forget?

Secondly, find an old point and shoot and do head to head comparisons. Any iPhone post 4S will be considerably better, within the restrictions of a pretty wide lens.

Audio is a lot better than the cassette tape walkmans that were so popular earlier too (though my current 6S and earlier 4S were noticeably better than my 3G). Of course, iPhone headphones are not flash but try a good pair and audio is not too bad at all.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2017 at 06:40 UTC
In reply to:

danredwing: Whatever your preference, it is foolish to claim that Apple doesn't deserve majority credit for the rise of the smartphone and the (almost) demise of the point and shoot camera market.

Ideas mean nothing, execution is everything. Though the iPhone wasn't the first device of its kind, it was the first that the masses wanted to use. I owned a Window's Pocket PC and a Palm Pilot, but the average person didn't

Simply put, with the iPhone, Apple combined marketing and a mix of features and ease of use that was attractive to the mass market. Yes, there have been technically more-capable devices along the way, but none has set the bar for features and design like the iPhone.

In addition, every glass front and plastic/metal back phone owes its basic design to the original iPhone. Remember that the first Android phone the G1 was a Blackberry-like clone in its design all the way up until the unveiling of the iPhone when Google rapidly redesigned the entire physical form of the phone.

Bang on!

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 21:05 UTC
In reply to:

supeyugin1: Never had an iPhone and not planning to pay premium prices for subpar hardware. Nokia and Samsung always had an edge over iPhones in terms of cameras. Before iPhone was released, I used HTC smartphones running Windows Mobile, then I switched to Android. Also tried Nokia smartphones, and while thier cameras were great, but the OSes were not as good as Android. So iPhone didn't affect me at all.

Check your dates! I used a handful of pre-iPhone internet-capable phones and, without doubt, the iPhone was a revolution! No wonder it was copied.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 06:43 UTC
On article Sony a9 banding issue: fact or fiction? (733 comments in total)
In reply to:

deep7: Very interesting. Presumably, in those situations, there is no need to use the electronic shutter, so the effect could be reduced? This really is a non-issue for most people but it still would be interesting to see how the A9 does against a range of other cameras with mechanical or electronic shutters. I think an Olympus EM1mk2 and a Canon 1DXMk2 would be interesting candidates.

Oh yeah, had forgotten that. Not my style of photography so easy to overlook those details!

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 06:38 UTC
On article Sony a9 banding issue: fact or fiction? (733 comments in total)

Very interesting. Presumably, in those situations, there is no need to use the electronic shutter, so the effect could be reduced? This really is a non-issue for most people but it still would be interesting to see how the A9 does against a range of other cameras with mechanical or electronic shutters. I think an Olympus EM1mk2 and a Canon 1DXMk2 would be interesting candidates.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 05:10 UTC as 116th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

supeyugin1: Never had an iPhone and not planning to pay premium prices for subpar hardware. Nokia and Samsung always had an edge over iPhones in terms of cameras. Before iPhone was released, I used HTC smartphones running Windows Mobile, then I switched to Android. Also tried Nokia smartphones, and while thier cameras were great, but the OSes were not as good as Android. So iPhone didn't affect me at all.

Except Android is an iOS copy so it did affect you!

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 05:03 UTC
On article Hands-on with Canon EOS Rebel SL2 / EOS 200D (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

David M So: So I'm kinda confused... I get that it's smaller (I've shot with a SL1 before), but is it THAT much of a difference when it comes to packing and carrying one? I mean... if you're getting a camera for size, you might as well get mirrorless like an M6 (which is a pretty decent shooter). What really is the advantage of an SL2 (besides an OVF)?

Probably a hefty cost saving...
I wouldn't call the optical viewfinder an advantage, personally.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2017 at 05:25 UTC
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: Richard, this is a great observation. The comments show people with very different requirements. 4K, 6k, 12K means nothing to me, but another user might want a video camera that is also takes still photos. Same for Wi-Fi, Facebook, etc. Some consumers want small cameras that are small; others are happy to start small and "accessorize" until a backpack is needed. To each his own. And any of the above make more sense than chosing a camera based on a DxO score.

I couldn't imagine EVER choosing a camera based on a DxO score!

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2017 at 20:34 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

Markr041: I do not understand the statement "we don't have RAW support". There is the free Olympus software in which you can work with the TG-5 RAW files. It is not as good as Lightroom or whatever, but it has plenty of tweaks and controls, far more than the camera.

Well said!

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2017 at 10:23 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

Your sarcasm is not only unhelpful, but shows a level of hypocrisy because it puts people off gaining from the experience of forum users and contributes nothing. Now you go right ahead and make another sarcastic response, tell me again that I am wrong and that you are ever so clever but please don't be surprised if I just ignore you. Take care.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 06:29 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

Please stop being silly. There are two possible types of softness here, assuming focus isn't affected. There is a lens softness which happens when elements move from optimum positions to stabilise the image. Some camera lenses are not affected much by that, others are. Sensor movement has no such effect unless the attached lens degrades badly towards the edges.

The other type of softness is when there is movement of the sensor, relative to the subject, of sufficient magnitude to cause a lateral shift in the image during exposure. Image stabilisation systems measure this movement and apply a compensation. You are saying that, in your careful testing, the sensor moved in the absence of anything to compensate for and created a lateral shift when there would otherwise not have been one. I am saying, in my careful tests, that didn't happen.

If my experience is in contradiction to the manufacturers advice, based on certain circumstances I do not encounter, I am not wrong! .

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 06:29 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

Keep your hair on, BadScience! (Appropriate name, too.) If you look at the first comment here, you'll see surlezi wanted something to automatically turn off the IBIS system when using a tripod. Some of us don't use a tripod for every shot and it's easy enough to forget to turn something on and off like that. It doesn't "beggar common sense"! He/she wants an automatic switch, I've found with some camera/tripod combinations it's not an issue. Maybe you have a wobbly tripod that waves in the wind? Try with your camera on a concrete floor if that's the case.

I read the E3 manual too. If you have done paired tests with your model(s) and found one setting gave consistently softer images (I wonder what that softness is?), then fine. I've found no difference at the pixel level. With my FZ1000, on the other hand, it is definitely worth turning off the anti-shake when on a tripod. My comment is based on experience, not armchair internet wisdom and I stand by it.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 21:53 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

E3, EP1, EM1 - all fine on a tripod. I've tested them.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 09:32 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)

Thanks for the review. Seriously, though, saying it's not so good for landscape or studio photographers is a bit harsh. It looks like it would be great for either. After all, it does have PLENTY of resolution and dynamic range, duh! Add in that it has some weather resistance and image stabilisation, not to mention light body weight and it's probably a very good landscape camera. I can't fathom why it wouldn't be good in a studio either...

(I don't have a Sony but felt a need to defend the undeserved negatives.)

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 09:30 UTC as 142nd comment | 3 replies
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

If it's anything like the Olympus system, there's no need to worry. It doesn't do that compensating dance you see with lens-based systems (I've had a few of those Olympus bodies, by the way).

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 09:24 UTC

As always, there are some arguments in these comments from people who are defending or plugging a type of camera they like (in this case, DSLRs v. so-called "mirrorless"). It's a silly way to look at things.

Technology is changing all the time and providing new possibilities. Removing the mirror box that film forced us to use (if we wanted to see through the lens) is one of the big ones. Some of the disadvantages of replacing an optical viewfinder with an electronic one (and the related consequences in terms of focus, lag time, whatever) are steadily being lost or even turned into advantages. Progress.

The changes in basic camera design, as seen from an intended use point of view, is moving the old niches around and creating new ones. This is nothing new. We are at a point of flux, as has happened a few times in photographic history. Argue away but I suggest it is better to embrace possibilities and hope that your preferred manufacturer(s) is going to keep in business!

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 05:32 UTC as 21st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: CIPA data reflects why Canon and Nikon are the biggest companies in the camera market; while those mirrorless cameras companies are small.
As an inverter, I will invest in the companies with high margin and high return. Why invest money in those low margin mirrorless cameras companies???

If you have money to invest, there are probably better places than investigating in camera companies right now! If you actually want to buy a camera to use, you will get better value for money if you buy from a company taking lower margins, obviously. I want to make a smart comment about your "inverter" typo but will leave it, despite the irony!

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 05:20 UTC
In reply to:

T3: I took a vacation trip to Taiwan a couple weeks ago, traveling all around the country. Mirrorless usage was very high there compared to DSLRs. I think Asian consumers are definitely more open to newer technology such as mirrorless ILC. They are much quicker to embrace these things. Plus, I think they are much less interested in carrying larger, bulky camera. They seem to value smaller and lighter electronics more than, say, North Americans do. Besides, feature wise, mirrorless cameras emulate smartphone cameras far better than DSLRs can, because all mirrorless cameras offer face detection AF, large AF coverage, real-time exposure preview, etc, all though the EVF, without a mirror in the way. So mirrorless is a much more natural and comfortable progression for consumers who grew up accustomed to the features of a smartphone camera.

NicoPPC - if you actually took my advice, you'd see that one lens is absolutely, in no way, the norm for a Canon SLR lens. Right there, you proved my point.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 05:15 UTC
In reply to:

T3: I took a vacation trip to Taiwan a couple weeks ago, traveling all around the country. Mirrorless usage was very high there compared to DSLRs. I think Asian consumers are definitely more open to newer technology such as mirrorless ILC. They are much quicker to embrace these things. Plus, I think they are much less interested in carrying larger, bulky camera. They seem to value smaller and lighter electronics more than, say, North Americans do. Besides, feature wise, mirrorless cameras emulate smartphone cameras far better than DSLRs can, because all mirrorless cameras offer face detection AF, large AF coverage, real-time exposure preview, etc, all though the EVF, without a mirror in the way. So mirrorless is a much more natural and comfortable progression for consumers who grew up accustomed to the features of a smartphone camera.

The jury met and decided T3 easily won this argument! Just walk into a shop, spend some time looking at all the m4/3 lenses (and Leica lenses if they have them), then walk over and look at all the Fuji lenses (clearly bigger), then look at the SLR lenses (huge!).

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2017 at 20:35 UTC
Total: 1055, showing: 21 – 40
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