deep7

Lives in New Zealand (Aotearoa) New Zealand (Aotearoa)
Works as a writer/photographer/ecologist
Has a website at deeppics.com
Joined on May 10, 2008
About me:

God makes it, I see it and photograph it. Sometimes that works well!

Comments

Total: 1026, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (62 comments in total)
In reply to:

Markr041: I do not understand the statement "we don't have RAW support". There is the free Olympus software in which you can work with the TG-5 RAW files. It is not as good as Lightroom or whatever, but it has plenty of tweaks and controls, far more than the camera.

Well said!

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2017 at 10:23 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2656 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

Your sarcasm is not only unhelpful, but shows a level of hypocrisy because it puts people off gaining from the experience of forum users and contributes nothing. Now you go right ahead and make another sarcastic response, tell me again that I am wrong and that you are ever so clever but please don't be surprised if I just ignore you. Take care.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 06:29 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2656 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

Please stop being silly. There are two possible types of softness here, assuming focus isn't affected. There is a lens softness which happens when elements move from optimum positions to stabilise the image. Some camera lenses are not affected much by that, others are. Sensor movement has no such effect unless the attached lens degrades badly towards the edges.

The other type of softness is when there is movement of the sensor, relative to the subject, of sufficient magnitude to cause a lateral shift in the image during exposure. Image stabilisation systems measure this movement and apply a compensation. You are saying that, in your careful testing, the sensor moved in the absence of anything to compensate for and created a lateral shift when there would otherwise not have been one. I am saying, in my careful tests, that didn't happen.

If my experience is in contradiction to the manufacturers advice, based on certain circumstances I do not encounter, I am not wrong! .

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 06:29 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2656 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

Keep your hair on, BadScience! (Appropriate name, too.) If you look at the first comment here, you'll see surlezi wanted something to automatically turn off the IBIS system when using a tripod. Some of us don't use a tripod for every shot and it's easy enough to forget to turn something on and off like that. It doesn't "beggar common sense"! He/she wants an automatic switch, I've found with some camera/tripod combinations it's not an issue. Maybe you have a wobbly tripod that waves in the wind? Try with your camera on a concrete floor if that's the case.

I read the E3 manual too. If you have done paired tests with your model(s) and found one setting gave consistently softer images (I wonder what that softness is?), then fine. I've found no difference at the pixel level. With my FZ1000, on the other hand, it is definitely worth turning off the anti-shake when on a tripod. My comment is based on experience, not armchair internet wisdom and I stand by it.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 21:53 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2656 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

E3, EP1, EM1 - all fine on a tripod. I've tested them.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 09:32 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2656 comments in total)

Thanks for the review. Seriously, though, saying it's not so good for landscape or studio photographers is a bit harsh. It looks like it would be great for either. After all, it does have PLENTY of resolution and dynamic range, duh! Add in that it has some weather resistance and image stabilisation, not to mention light body weight and it's probably a very good landscape camera. I can't fathom why it wouldn't be good in a studio either...

(I don't have a Sony but felt a need to defend the undeserved negatives.)

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 09:30 UTC as 126th comment | 3 replies
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2656 comments in total)
In reply to:

surlezi: Other con:
No automatic IBIS ON/OFF option.

I don't think such option exist elsewhere, but it would be nice if the camera could detect when it's been on a tripod for a while and switch off IBIS automatically, then back on when it feels it's being moved.

If it's anything like the Olympus system, there's no need to worry. It doesn't do that compensating dance you see with lens-based systems (I've had a few of those Olympus bodies, by the way).

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 09:24 UTC

As always, there are some arguments in these comments from people who are defending or plugging a type of camera they like (in this case, DSLRs v. so-called "mirrorless"). It's a silly way to look at things.

Technology is changing all the time and providing new possibilities. Removing the mirror box that film forced us to use (if we wanted to see through the lens) is one of the big ones. Some of the disadvantages of replacing an optical viewfinder with an electronic one (and the related consequences in terms of focus, lag time, whatever) are steadily being lost or even turned into advantages. Progress.

The changes in basic camera design, as seen from an intended use point of view, is moving the old niches around and creating new ones. This is nothing new. We are at a point of flux, as has happened a few times in photographic history. Argue away but I suggest it is better to embrace possibilities and hope that your preferred manufacturer(s) is going to keep in business!

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 05:32 UTC as 20th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: CIPA data reflects why Canon and Nikon are the biggest companies in the camera market; while those mirrorless cameras companies are small.
As an inverter, I will invest in the companies with high margin and high return. Why invest money in those low margin mirrorless cameras companies???

If you have money to invest, there are probably better places than investigating in camera companies right now! If you actually want to buy a camera to use, you will get better value for money if you buy from a company taking lower margins, obviously. I want to make a smart comment about your "inverter" typo but will leave it, despite the irony!

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 05:20 UTC
In reply to:

T3: I took a vacation trip to Taiwan a couple weeks ago, traveling all around the country. Mirrorless usage was very high there compared to DSLRs. I think Asian consumers are definitely more open to newer technology such as mirrorless ILC. They are much quicker to embrace these things. Plus, I think they are much less interested in carrying larger, bulky camera. They seem to value smaller and lighter electronics more than, say, North Americans do. Besides, feature wise, mirrorless cameras emulate smartphone cameras far better than DSLRs can, because all mirrorless cameras offer face detection AF, large AF coverage, real-time exposure preview, etc, all though the EVF, without a mirror in the way. So mirrorless is a much more natural and comfortable progression for consumers who grew up accustomed to the features of a smartphone camera.

NicoPPC - if you actually took my advice, you'd see that one lens is absolutely, in no way, the norm for a Canon SLR lens. Right there, you proved my point.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 05:15 UTC
In reply to:

T3: I took a vacation trip to Taiwan a couple weeks ago, traveling all around the country. Mirrorless usage was very high there compared to DSLRs. I think Asian consumers are definitely more open to newer technology such as mirrorless ILC. They are much quicker to embrace these things. Plus, I think they are much less interested in carrying larger, bulky camera. They seem to value smaller and lighter electronics more than, say, North Americans do. Besides, feature wise, mirrorless cameras emulate smartphone cameras far better than DSLRs can, because all mirrorless cameras offer face detection AF, large AF coverage, real-time exposure preview, etc, all though the EVF, without a mirror in the way. So mirrorless is a much more natural and comfortable progression for consumers who grew up accustomed to the features of a smartphone camera.

The jury met and decided T3 easily won this argument! Just walk into a shop, spend some time looking at all the m4/3 lenses (and Leica lenses if they have them), then walk over and look at all the Fuji lenses (clearly bigger), then look at the SLR lenses (huge!).

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2017 at 20:35 UTC
On article Fujifilm GF 32-64mm F4 R LM WR sample gallery (140 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZeBebito: Nothing a proper FF camera can't do.

JensR, sorry, not worth discussing such things with someone who is showing some bias in his/her posts!

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2017 at 03:24 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Cameras (275 comments in total)
In reply to:

David wildlife: I recently bought the FZ1000 for bird photography and I liked the results of this roundup. Although this camera came out in the year 2104 is interesting how it managed to stay in the first place of 2016 between the bridge cameras in different photography sites (techradar, ephotozine, etc.). Put simply, I think the RX10 II may have a slightly better quality but the price is excessively higher and I do not think it will make up for it. The price is important in this type of evaluations and that is why the FZ1000 is the best overall and the RX10 II is the premium choice. With the FZ1000, Panasonic has been able to produce a high quality camera at a reasonable price, which, incidentally, can not be said of the FZ2500.

I held off from the FZ1000 for exactly that reason. Then I went through my bird photo collection and realised the really good photos from my DSLRs/m43rds cameras were taken at equivalent focal lengths of around 400-480mm and I relaxed. It's proven to be pretty good but you have to use the cross-hair autofocus if you want super-sharp photos at the long end. I had a FZ70 for a while to try the concept out and the FZ1000 is much better if you want printable photos (the FZ70 is fine at full zoom if you just want a record of what you saw and really good if you pull back to under 500mm e.f.l.).

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2017 at 21:00 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Cameras (275 comments in total)

I was genuinely surprised to see the FZ1000 top this list. Which is strange, because I bought one a few months ago after considering all these options (and waiting for no-show Nikon)!

I now find myself in the odd position where my "little" take-everywhere camera is much bigger than my serious "big" camera (EM1) but the thing is I CAN take it everywhere and it does everything and does it well. A tip for other FZ1000 users: when using the macro setting, zoom the lens precisely to "46mm" for maximum magnification. That gives surprisingly good magnification. Second tip: use the "precise" focus setting at long focal lengths and the lens will suddenly seem a lot sharper...

I absolutely would have picked the G3X if it had a real viewfinder. Much better size and shape and more weather resistant. I may also have picked the RX10/3 if it hadn't been two and half times the price. Dunno though. The Panasonic is pretty intuitive to use, the Sony needs some learning.

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2017 at 20:48 UTC as 20th comment
In reply to:

CaPi: Nice updates. strange macOS name.
oh an to all the 8k video processing folks here: Dont use notebooks for more than just checking quality, Just dont. Use desktops. Save a lot of time. Have more of your life

Thanks but, dull as my life is, it's not quite dull enough to worry about something as unexciting as that!

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2017 at 04:04 UTC
In reply to:

CaPi: Nice updates. strange macOS name.
oh an to all the 8k video processing folks here: Dont use notebooks for more than just checking quality, Just dont. Use desktops. Save a lot of time. Have more of your life

Can't imagine anyone would sue you for using a cat name. There were so many more they could have used. Place names in California mean nothing to most people on planet Earth!

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2017 at 05:36 UTC
In reply to:

WastingTime: News wise, this beats the previous keynote, at least nothing essential got removed. Today was a good day.

Good point! Though if you can't turn off that dreadful feature where your phone ships your text messages off to "the cloud", I absolutely won't play that game with them.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 03:40 UTC
On article Sigma SD Quattro H Review (691 comments in total)
In reply to:

pjbw127: Detailed landscapes - yes,
Can afford it - yes.
Tilting screen - no,
Sorree!

Fixed screen - excellent! Each to his own.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 03:58 UTC
On article Sigma SD Quattro H Review (691 comments in total)
In reply to:

deep7: Despite some quirky, even illogical, design decisions, this camera appeals hugely for "considered" photography. This review has been very helpful, thank you, and the ACR conversions possibly the best I have seen here, which was a surprise!

However, lens choice looks to be a problem. The 35/1.4 would work as a nice standard lens but there is no suitable prime for portraiture with the APS-H format sensor. 50mm is a tad wide, 85mm is really quite long. It's a similar story if you want a decent wide prime. As a potential landscape camera, I wonder what zoom lens choices would get the most out of that sensor?

Anyway, good on Sigma, I hope they do really well with this system and maybe think about making ideal lenses for their own camera...

Or just wait! I'm still curious enough to want to handle one sometime.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 00:28 UTC
On article Sigma SD Quattro H Review (691 comments in total)

Despite some quirky, even illogical, design decisions, this camera appeals hugely for "considered" photography. This review has been very helpful, thank you, and the ACR conversions possibly the best I have seen here, which was a surprise!

However, lens choice looks to be a problem. The 35/1.4 would work as a nice standard lens but there is no suitable prime for portraiture with the APS-H format sensor. 50mm is a tad wide, 85mm is really quite long. It's a similar story if you want a decent wide prime. As a potential landscape camera, I wonder what zoom lens choices would get the most out of that sensor?

Anyway, good on Sigma, I hope they do really well with this system and maybe think about making ideal lenses for their own camera...

Link | Posted on May 31, 2017 at 21:35 UTC as 113th comment | 2 replies
Total: 1026, showing: 1 – 20
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