Erick L

Lives in Canada Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Canada
Has a website at http://www.borealphoto.com
Joined on Aug 17, 2006

Comments

Total: 132, showing: 1 – 20
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This is what the Nikon DL 18-50 was made for... :(

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 03:38 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Sdaniella: traveling ultra light is strictly a sunny endeavor ...

attempting the exact same colorful scenery, albeit moonlit, and the blue sky filled also with stars ... golden hour in deep hours of night, too ... one must travel quite a bit heavier ...

Less than a pound heavier for a trailpix, two for a stand alone tripod.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2017 at 21:18 UTC
In reply to:

wb2trf: "Camera companies want your money, but they're rarely stupid..." Rarely stupid? But, they make some whopper stupid decisions when they do. The Nikon 1 is a great example of a marketing driven decision that was incredibly stupid. In fact its full stupidity is still unfolding. "4K on EOS or not "is nothing, nothing, neither here nor there, by comparison to the NIkon 1.

In other words, Nikon was stupid. The DL line and Pentax mirrorless are another example. Panasonic said they were surprised that mirrorless buyers were coming from SLRs instead of phones and P&S. Anyone spending time on these forums could see that coming. This notion that manufacturers know better isn't true.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 01:25 UTC
On article Photo of the week: Torment (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dheorl: Am I the only one who prefers it cropped to lose the bottom 1/8th or so?

That distracting bit at the bottom looks like a washed out footprint.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 21:20 UTC
On article Imaging Resource selects best cameras for backpacking (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

theRose: Isnt the point of backpacking that you travel very simple and you meet a lot of people? Which mean your gear needs to easy to hide and relatively cheap so you can replace it if it gets stolen? Or is my backpacking experience strange?
These cameras are to me very professional but easy to carry stuff but not something I would bring to a crowded hostel!

Wilderness backpacking, not travelling with a backpack.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 23:02 UTC
On article In praise of shooting monochrome landscapes (335 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stacey_K: I think the things that had the most influence on my photography were: shooting with one prime lens (equal to a 50mm) and B&W only film for over a year.

B&W doesn't lie. You can't use a sunset or vivid colors to cover up a bad subject matter. Same with using a 50mm lens.

The other influence was shooting 4X5 film. The limited number of film holders you could carry + the expense of each shot really made me slow down and make sure each one counts.

As far as "pre-visualizing", it's still an important part of the process to me. I know what I want the final results to look like before I shoot. Today, it might include knowing I am going to clone out part of the image etc, but I still have a vision for what the final print will look like before I shoot it.

Yes, colors become gray shapes which are easier to deal with in post.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2017 at 00:33 UTC
On article In praise of shooting monochrome landscapes (335 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stacey_K: I think the things that had the most influence on my photography were: shooting with one prime lens (equal to a 50mm) and B&W only film for over a year.

B&W doesn't lie. You can't use a sunset or vivid colors to cover up a bad subject matter. Same with using a 50mm lens.

The other influence was shooting 4X5 film. The limited number of film holders you could carry + the expense of each shot really made me slow down and make sure each one counts.

As far as "pre-visualizing", it's still an important part of the process to me. I know what I want the final results to look like before I shoot. Today, it might include knowing I am going to clone out part of the image etc, but I still have a vision for what the final print will look like before I shoot it.

B&W lies plenty, if not more. It's often used to cover up flat colors and turn ordinary photos into graphical images.

Ditto for 50mm. It's just a focal length. I learned with a super-zoom and I think it's a much better learning tool than a single prime lens.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 16:39 UTC
On article In praise of shooting monochrome landscapes (335 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dante Birchen: Digital monochrome is just fakery. Shoot like Ansel Adams when you want to do mono.

"Why would you want to copy another person's style"

That's how people learn.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 12:28 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (890 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mac McCreery: I wonder if younger photographers are influenced by their experiences of using screens on phones, compact cams, tablets and so on. It seems that we are increasingly seeing the world through or on a screen.
I do hesitate when I see folk with dslrs handholding and using live view with the camera at arms length. But if it works, who cares! I just find it funny!

I started with film SLR and now use mirrorless and mostly compose at arm's length. I find it easier to make big and small adjustments while easily seeing what's outside the frame. I also get sharper pictures at arm's length, thanks to the 5 axis IBIS. It's quite liberating not being tied to eye-level compositions (or moving the whole body

I also zoom from wherever I'm standing. At least I seem to. I figured out that you don't need a camera to compose until you're ready to take the shot.

I even hold the camera the "wrong way" (shutter button down) in vertical composition because I find it more comfortable and stable.

So if saw me shooting, you'd think I don't know how to use a camera. Some people just try different things and figure out for themselves what works better.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 11:54 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (890 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mac McCreery: I wonder if younger photographers are influenced by their experiences of using screens on phones, compact cams, tablets and so on. It seems that we are increasingly seeing the world through or on a screen.
I do hesitate when I see folk with dslrs handholding and using live view with the camera at arms length. But if it works, who cares! I just find it funny!

What is sad about it?

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2017 at 18:10 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (890 comments in total)

I mostly use the screen nowadays.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2017 at 22:27 UTC as 225th comment
On article CP+ 2017: Hands-on with Sigma's newest lenses (199 comments in total)

How did you get the US president to hold the 5D and 14/1.8?

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 02:05 UTC as 14th comment | 3 replies

The built-in Arca plate is a nice touch.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2017 at 23:56 UTC as 52nd comment
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: I assume I am taking a risk every time I strike out on a hike. The NPS sets boundaries for a variety of reasons many of which benefit NPS and their budget.

I don't find the image with the tripod compelling enough to agree with the boundary set by whatever agency did it on the basis of safety. What would be a more compelling deterrent for me is the quality of the composition from that angle. Moving closer would probably set off alarms that I am not going to get anything really useful vs. the risk that I couldn't get back behind the boundary with a long zoom.

"And only you don't. Or it's the other way round."

Oh I do, like everyone else. I don't claim to be a saint though. Lots of hypocrites posting under this article, when they put everyone else's life in danger by driving over the speed limit several times a day.

Like Jesus said: let the one who never stepped off trail throw the first water bottle.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2017 at 16:41 UTC
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: I assume I am taking a risk every time I strike out on a hike. The NPS sets boundaries for a variety of reasons many of which benefit NPS and their budget.

I don't find the image with the tripod compelling enough to agree with the boundary set by whatever agency did it on the basis of safety. What would be a more compelling deterrent for me is the quality of the composition from that angle. Moving closer would probably set off alarms that I am not going to get anything really useful vs. the risk that I couldn't get back behind the boundary with a long zoom.

I bet all of you disregard "safety rules" several times a day while driving.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2017 at 03:56 UTC

Reminds me of travel pics with Mr Potato: http://www.spudstravels.com/

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2017 at 15:28 UTC as 50th comment
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: "a to-the-eye shooting stance gives a much steadier grip for hand-held shooting than holding the camera at waist level"

Got that? "MUCH steadier."

Thank you.

Not always true with IBIS.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 15:46 UTC

These were actually dug up from F-stop ridge and restored.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 00:06 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

dmanthree: Just a great shot. For the photographer to maintain his cool during a live shooting and capture this image speaks volumes. The negative comments in this thread are pretty embarrassing, and likely posted by camera owners who have never faced any sort of adverse situation that required them to look, act, and *not* panic and run. I've seen many examples of technically poor photos that have won Pulitzer prizes, and this one is right up there with them, and technically very good, as well. Great job by the photographer.

Most negative comments are targeted at the DPR article, not the photographer.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 15:31 UTC
In reply to:

techjedi: With great respect, the photographer helped the assassin glamourize the murder and this photo will serve as a recruiting tool for terrorist groups. How exactly does this serve as an encouragement for pro photography? It is a great picture, but I am fairly sure the civilized world would have been no less off without it.

"Any sane, rational person viewing this photograph will be repulsed by this scum's act and his perverted ideology"

It's not the sane people you have to worry about.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 05:02 UTC
Total: 132, showing: 1 – 20
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