rhlpetrus

Lives in Brazil Campinas, Brazil
Works as a math professor
Joined on May 4, 2007

Comments

Total: 604, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony a9: more speed, less dynamic range (666 comments in total)

I had suspected that speed would imply a cost in base ISO DR. It had happened to the 21MP sensor in the D5 as well.

Curiously, the cost is much less in the D500, but it's not as fast asthe D5.

For most mortals, the speed in these cameras is not relevant, so it's better to go for the "slower" versions, 6-7 fps is pretty good already.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2017 at 15:35 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1905 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jose G: They utterly Nailed it..... they really did, all wishes were answer and for those whom bork at the price consider the D5 or 1DX2.... this I will buy.

How about the f/11 restriction of tracking AF?

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 16:46 UTC
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1905 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: This is the ultimate sports camera. I think Sony is sparing its best sensors to itself and selling lower quality sensors to Nikon. This is perfectly normal for competition. I could not see sync speed. I hope that Sony could find a solution for old shutter curtains.

D500's sensor is Sony and is better than any APS-C sensor used by Sony ...

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 16:44 UTC
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1905 comments in total)
In reply to:

rhlpetrus: Mostly interested in:

1. Base ISO DR and high ISO performance of new sensor tech
2. Tracking ability of AF at 20fps

I hope they produce an enthusiast version of this camera, say 10fps and some cheaper VF technology. Could be a good reason for many people to jump into the ML bandwagon. Canon and Nikon are being just too conservative at this point ...

Maybe Sony will buy Nikon and learn how to do AF and metering right.

;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 16:38 UTC
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1905 comments in total)

Mostly interested in:

1. Base ISO DR and high ISO performance of new sensor tech
2. Tracking ability of AF at 20fps

I hope they produce an enthusiast version of this camera, say 10fps and some cheaper VF technology. Could be a good reason for many people to jump into the ML bandwagon. Canon and Nikon are being just too conservative at this point ...

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 16:34 UTC as 309th comment | 2 replies

Absolute figures? FF market is very small, smallchanges make for large relative movements.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 19:55 UTC as 127th comment
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mister Joseph: If you want 2 SD card slots, buy 2 D7500's. Same price as a 2-slot D500.

It seems some people can't see a joke ...

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 15:11 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

samfan: Thom Hogan also says the D7500 doesn't have the AI aperture feeler, is that true? I believe the older mid-range models had that since the D80 if I'm not mistaken.

So, dual cards removed, ability to attach the battery grip removed, presumably the AI emulator removed. Seems like Nikon is trying to distinguish the 2 cameras by quite a bit.

I guess it does make sense and potential customers are less likely to agonize over the decision which one to get. If either of those features is critical, then you have to get the D500, obviously. But it's the current owners of the older mid-range models up to D7200 that would wish to upgrade with the same price point that are going to be ticked off if they've used any of the features before.

The dual cards are kinda controversial, but the lack of a battery grip really baffles me. Battery grips did kinda drop in popularity in recent years, but I know a lot of people use them on these models, and back in the day its lack was a major drawback of D70.

Thom is right, D7xxx line held the DX top spot while they decided on the D500, now it is back to where D80 and D90 sat in D300 days. Price, corrected for inflation, is below D80/D90's.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 15:07 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tactical Falcon: Hmm, another D7xxx I don't want. Because my D7100 is doing just fine thank you. Who wants this camera? I don't know. But you know, a few will like it. Good on them, but my money will go to better glass.

The D7100 employs the worst sensor among D7xxx bodies, the D7500 AF is much better, videos is too, it's faster and has a nice buffer, which the previous D7xxx lack. Same initial price, not bad actually. Myself, still below the D7000's skills 😊

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 15:04 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zoom Zoom Zoom: The lack of Nikon's innovation is staggering! With every "new" model, they basically come out with something that is just barely upped from the same previously released or similar model retrofitted camera! How this brand survives, it's absolutely a mystery to me.

Panchorancho: compare D80 and D7500 and tell me how your "deducts one feature" works for this line of cameras.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 15:00 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Average User: Interesting article, but it feels as though the D7200 should be included in this discussion. By all reports the D7200 is an almost perfect camera with a really great sensor. Some might say, they would like everything in the new camera, but with the D7200 sensor. But we don't have that choice.
Additions to the 7500 compared to the 7200, which contribute significantly to better IQ are: tiltable screen; touch screen; much better fine tune; better auto focus; and better video. It's a compelling list. You give up one card slot and trade away a little bit of resolution to get better low light. Overall, it's significantly better.
Given the excellence of the D7200, the upgrade from D7200 to D7500, would be a half-step. If I were going to upgrade from the D7200, it would be to the D500.
Price differences are overrated. The real investment anyone makes in a camera, is the hundreds of hours it takes to learn it.

The sensor of D7200 is not better.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 14:58 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sarah Terra: Number one problem for the 7500 is the price, need to come down to 1000

It is cheaper than the D80 was at launch, given inflation.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 14:57 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: It's quite simple, Nikon needed to put highly professional features into their mid-level camera to make it a viable choice for D300 users. Now that a D500 exists, any meaninful succession to the d7200 would be, well a D500. So they repositioned this segment back to where it was in the D90 and where Canon position their 60D/80D line.

Include inflation and and the D7500 is cheaper than D80, D90, ..., D7200. It's avery good camera, and the logic is correct, now they don't need the "pro" features any more, but they kept some, like the 100% VF. If anyone got the D7200 to use non-CPU lenses, or for the 2 slots, then the natural update is the D500, which was what many wanted, the top APS-C body.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 14:55 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (540 comments in total)
In reply to:

felix from the suburbs: As a long time Sony user I was looking for a secondary camera that would let me use some of the newer Sigma Art and Tamron lenses that only seem to be available for Nikon or Canon mounts. I have read some of the negative comments here, but, in my case, the 7500 seems to be just what I was looking for. Hopefully it will be available in Toronto at the same time as it's available in the rest of the world.

Its sensor, in my experience testing the D500's, is likely the best APS-C sensor available in Nikons, which are generally the best around (it's a Sony, actually, but designed for Nikon to be used in high speed shooting on the D500). The AF should also be great for action. A good option.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 19:05 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (540 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bobbert1: Looks like Nikon hasn't learned much, The D500 focous system really should have been incorparated in the 7500. Lack of really really good focus I think is one of Nikons problems. No inovation here just featurs from different cameras put in another body.
The had the right idea with the D5.

Lack of really really good focus? really really?

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 19:02 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S Review: Modern MF (904 comments in total)

Why no cityscape with D810? It is much better than the Canon on the portrait, in all aspects, should do well on the other image as well, despite its lower pixel count. Awesome performance by the dslr.

On the portrait, one issue with the Nikon x Fuji comparison is the DoF, which is much shallower on the Fuji, just check the area around the tie knot, the Fuji is oof there, while the Nikon is still holding it pretty well. I assume both were focused on the left eye, was that so?

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 19:52 UTC as 48th comment | 6 replies

Panny compacts have always been the best in the market, specially the upper-grade ones, like the LX100. I hope they keep that line, among fixed-lens lines, but most will likely go, smartphones have taken over the low-grade market. mFT should remain, unless Panny is really in trouble and goes for a deep restructuring.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 11:27 UTC as 39th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

cshyde: I used the Kodak plastic brownie to take my first pictures on 127 roll film. My Dad bought a Kodak Retina in the 1960's I used that until I scrimped and saved enough money to buy a Pentax Spotmatic F in High School. While in college I bought an Olympus OM-1 system which I wore out just in time to start playing with digital. I had one of those Sony cameras that stored pictures on a floppy disk. Today I carry my iPhone and a Panasonic LX-7 every day. I use a Nikon D500 for work in industrial photography. I still shoot film and thanks to the Millenial hipsters it's making a comeback. I knew they would turn out to be good for something.

I also started with 127 roll film Kodak Brownie Starlet (1966) and moved up to a AP Spotmatic F in 1974, at the end of my first year in college.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 13:58 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (392 comments in total)

Well, very long ago (1966), I got a Brazilian version of the Kodak Brownie Starlet for my 10th birthday, it was called Kodak Rio 400, as it commemorated the 400 years of Rio de Janeiro's founding (1965).

http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Kodak_Brownie_Starlet
https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7598/16295635584_9981af71a8.jpg

Recently I got perfect copy in the styrofoam box, mine got lost somewhere along my many movings. It started my affair with photography, still keep many images taken with it, of family mostly, including dog of course.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 13:56 UTC as 228th comment

The decline in actual cameras started in 2010, after peaking in 2009, according to the graph, and it is basically due to the waning compact camera sector. ILCs will survive at the 8-10 million units/year, not a bad number, likely more than in the 1990s or earlier.

No wonder Hassy and Leica are putting cameras or whatever with their brand names in smartphones.

Smartphones brought instant photography to the masses, a good thing, why so much worry around here. Now almost everybody in all parts of the world can take a picture, send it over via one of the social media systems to friends and family, still a very good thing.

Artistic and well-done documentary photography have always been the realm of a few, like any other human endeavour that involves dedication, craft, etc., and will stay that way. There are 100 millions lenses by Nikon and another bunch by Canon out there. A few million people involved seriously in photography is likely more than in any other similar human activity.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 14:59 UTC as 42nd comment
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