_sem_

Lives in Pitcairn Pitcairn
Joined on Dec 18, 2008

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Total: 203, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Marabak: Interesting article. Something similar for Nikon would be a great idea, but as I already own the Sigma 105mm macro I'm not sure I can justify spending more money on a different lens system, even if it does have an increase in mag. Might go the Raynox route instead.

No problem, you can do macros anyway you like. Just saying that the reversed-wide-angle approach is quite convenient at high magnifications, especially with auto-aperture which lets you aim easily and even hunt moving subjects (surely it is not easy). With a small wide-angle lens, the setup is small and convenient for lugging around, and even the pop-up flash with an ad-hoc diffuser may be useful.
The extension-tube approach is easier at moderate magnifications, but with longer extension for increasing the magnification the working distance tends to shrink. Reversing the lens tends to work around the working distance issue.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2017 at 11:24 UTC
In reply to:

shnsea: Great article. I am not familiar with this extension tube and reverse adapter but how do the focus and aperture control on this rig work? Can you still use autofocus? Also, what is the advantage of using a reverse adapter instead of just longer extension tube.

Even AF could work if there were enough light, but there usually isn't at such magnifications.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 11:26 UTC
In reply to:

SteB: Very good. It's worth mentioning here that the article linked to is by John Hallmen, one of the best macro photographers in the world. I've found that Google translate does a great job with this blog with only the odd word it can't translate.

This is John's Flickr Photostream for anyone who wants to know why I regard John as one of the best macro photographers in the world. Prepare to be blown away.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnhallmen/

Anyone who is interested in this article may be fascinated with another article by John, where using a similar set up to this, but with the Canon 24mm f2.8 STM + a small CCTV lens John has created a relay lens set up, a type of high magnification fish-eye lens, which produces images only this type of set-up can produce. Just pop the link into Google translate to read in English.
http://makrofokus.se/blogg/2016/9/22/diy-makro-fisheye.html

"...the Canon 24mm f2.8 STM + a small CCTV lens John has created a relay lens set up, a type of high magnification fish-eye lens, which produces images only this type of set-up can produce"

Yes close-ups at extreme wide angle are often impressive, because the low relative background blur allows good interaction of the subject with the environment. Mind some DSLR fisheyes do reasonably high magnifications at close focus (Nikkor 10.5) or can be hacked to focus a bit closer (Samyang 8), and the Laowa 15/4 macro is made for 1:1 anyway. Though finding a lens which produces good magnification at a useful working distance is indeed tricky, and the small C-mount lenses may also allow easier physical access and more room for light (some have mounted them on Pentax Q - an optical relay to FF or APS-C is a curiosity but may not be superior).

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 11:24 UTC
In reply to:

Marabak: Interesting article. Something similar for Nikon would be a great idea, but as I already own the Sigma 105mm macro I'm not sure I can justify spending more money on a different lens system, even if it does have an increase in mag. Might go the Raynox route instead.

I mean, shooting high magnifications handheld with flash is much easier if you have auto-aperture with reversed lens as with the Meike thing. Not saying that it can't be done with manual aperture, but it is tough with moving subjects if you hardly see anything.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 10:31 UTC
In reply to:

Marabak: Interesting article. Something similar for Nikon would be a great idea, but as I already own the Sigma 105mm macro I'm not sure I can justify spending more money on a different lens system, even if it does have an increase in mag. Might go the Raynox route instead.

Pity Meike makes only for Canon. Feasible also with the new Nikkor lenses that have electronic aperture. Some folks have hacked ordinary auto extension tubes (on Oly I recall).

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 13:56 UTC
In reply to:

panther fan: If you already have a macro lens, shouldn't it be possible to reach the same magnification with extension tubes and get similar quality results? (At least for 2:1 magnification)

This approach is most useful for higher than 2x. Just with extension tubes, the working distance shrinks with extension, eventually reaching nil, while a reversed lens focussed correctly has the working distance equal to the flange distance (and likely more when the sensor is closer then the MFD position).

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 13:53 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: I prefer to use the macro lens, or the bellows, depending on the situation at hand.
I also use the macro tubes on my Canon and on my Sony gear, with Canon EF and FD adapters on the Sony E-mount.

I got the bellows several years ago, and it was a combo purchase with a 75mm lens made for macro/closeup photography. A very sharp lens.

Since distance and focus adjustment is manual (using the bellows), the process is a bit slow, but high precision.
For quicker action, I use the macro lens or the extension tubes.

For light, I just use a Cree XML-T6, powered by a 3.7 volt, 18650 Li-Io, 6000 ma/h, which provides a lot of lighting, and the battery lasts for a very long time (weeks, for light use). One needs to be very careful directing (aiming) the flashlight.

I don't shoot much of "true" macro anymore, but plenty of closeup relying on zooms.
Somehow I don't bother with shooting insects anymore, aside from some exceptions.

In fact this is a bellows-like approach, and an automated one. With a relatively short focal length, not much extension is needed for high magnifications, so extension tubes are okay. It would have been nice to have short continuously-adjustable extension though.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 13:45 UTC
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (200 comments in total)
In reply to:

_sem_: Another Pixel camera review that fails to make it clear what to expect in low light *handheld* using HDR+ vs top phone cameras which have OIS. Cameraphones are rarely used on tripods, so the studio comparison isn't of much use.

Sorry tripod makes the comparison invalid, except for shooting on tripod, which is rarely the case with smartphone users. A valid comparison would involve a relevant and controlled amount of camera shake as in handheld use.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2017 at 08:14 UTC
In reply to:

ttran88: Nikon killed the DLs to protect Nikon 1 sales. Like how they won't release a a big sensor mirrorless to protect their dslr sales. Or how they won't release more APSC lenses like the great DX 35mm f1.8 to protect their FX sales. They probably won't make their video on dslrs better either to protect their Key Mission sales. Good job Nikon!!!

The impression is they axed the N1 dept a while ago. Stillborn anyway...

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 21:11 UTC

Page not found???

Link | Posted on Jan 13, 2017 at 09:54 UTC as 4th comment
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (200 comments in total)

Another Pixel camera review that fails to make it clear what to expect in low light *handheld* using HDR+ vs top phone cameras which have OIS. Cameraphones are rarely used on tripods, so the studio comparison isn't of much use.

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2016 at 09:28 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies
On article New 20mm F2 4.5x macro lens released by Mitakon (122 comments in total)
In reply to:

Carl Mucks: So, it's a microscope lens in DSLR mount. I guess it's just easier to use a regular microscope that provides a camera mount -- at least you'll have a lighting built, and holders, etc.

"Running around outdoor with a microscope attached to the camera?"

This is not infeasible, with flash attached properly.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 13:26 UTC
On article New 20mm F2 4.5x macro lens released by Mitakon (122 comments in total)
In reply to:

DamianFI: This'll be ergonomically a nightmare. They need some kind of lighting kit with it.

Anything around 4x is ergonomically a nightmare.

"Users no longer need to DIY or use any extension tubes to reach high magnification shooting."
Well, I don't think there is such a big ergonomic difference between this and the Nikkor AI-s 20/3.5 reversed on a bit of extension. Attaching the reversal ring and an extension tube takes much less effort than providing support and light. The aperture is manual, and 4x-4.5x is not much range. The only thing I can think of is that it might be sharper wide-open, like microscope objectives, for stacking applications.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 09:06 UTC
On article New 20mm F2 4.5x macro lens released by Mitakon (122 comments in total)
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: Wish they had made it from 2x to 4x - but then it wouldn't be selling for US$199. :-)
Also, anyone thinking about this has to think about the cost of supplemental lighting, as other posts have mentioned.

It'd take a built-in helical extension, but it is possible.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 08:54 UTC
On article New 20mm F2 4.5x macro lens released by Mitakon (122 comments in total)
In reply to:

Carl Mucks: So, it's a microscope lens in DSLR mount. I guess it's just easier to use a regular microscope that provides a camera mount -- at least you'll have a lighting built, and holders, etc.

I think it's not a microscope lens in DSLR mount. There are two kinds of microscope objectives and this one doesn't look like any of the two.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 08:51 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Favorable Exponynt: very sharp, but not for portraits :p

Or perhaps they should try a different model or photographer?
Whoever will shoot portraits with it will likely appreciate the focus limiter lacking on many a macro in this range.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 23:35 UTC
On article OWC's Thunderbolt 3 Dock adds 13 ports to your MacBook (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

cosinaphile: 300 dollars ???? 300 really ??????

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaahahahahahaahahahahahahahaha.....
hahahhahaahahahahahahahahahahahahaah
hahaha.....aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa......AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHA......

YOU WANT A DONGLE ? a frickin 300 dongle

this debacle , just when you think it cant get any worse
this is 100 dollar item , if that . at best !.... but lets sell it the apple faithful for 300 usd?.........my god ! you cant make this crap up

Well others tend to sell TB3 for similar money... but the biggest issue is that they don't even work ;(

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2016 at 10:13 UTC
On article OWC's Thunderbolt 3 Dock adds 13 ports to your MacBook (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marcos Villaroman: What's nice about USB-C is that this docking station can be used by all laptops with a USB-C connector.

Pity it only has the one mini displayport. I wonder if two to three 4K monitors will require the bandwidth of a separate USB-C port.

I'm curious regarding the reliability. I've noticed several major vendors have major issues with the compatibility of their "own" TB docks. For instance, Dell TB15 was silently withdrawn, presumably because of overheating issues with 2 4K displays - but there were severe issues even with usb mice and keyboards.

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2016 at 10:11 UTC
In reply to:

rfsIII: Great article!
One question: Are you saying that it's only through the camera makers' software that we can achieve these effects? Photoshop, Lightroom, GIMP and the rest won't give us access to these features?
If true this is a bummer because the mfr software is awful. Every time I have to use Nikon's VIewNX I feel like throwing my computer (and my camera) into the Mersey.

Yes there are technical reasons why auto-raw-ETTR probably wouldn't always work perfectly if implemented (small specular highlights, low-res exposure sensors with DSLR or metering simplifications with mirrorless).

Folks that use the abbreviation "ETTL" mostly misuse ETTR/ETTL for increasing/decreasing exposure.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2016 at 13:33 UTC
In reply to:

obsolescence: The last sentence stands out in my mind: "Short of providing the tools that would allow photographers to reliably expose to the right..." This article should be expanded to encompass Raw capture & processing. Unless the lighting is carefully controlled, JPEG capture actually cripples the system by applying generic processing, however sophisticated it may be, where it should really be tailored to the scene.

If we're truly interested in maximizing DR, then Raw capture is the only way to go and good exposure technique is the first step. The only way to refine exposure technique is to analyze the Raw files with RawDigger and learn the response of the camera's metering modes in different lighting scenarios. The next step is to learn and practice the best Raw and post processing techniques. Finally, making prints using custom profiles for the media provides the most reliable way to judge the results because screen viewing does not reveal all the subtleties.

Some more resources regarding ETTR:
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/6641165460/ettr-exposed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposing_to_the_right
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/8148042898/exposure-vs-brightening

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2016 at 07:53 UTC
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