Rob Sims

Rob Sims

Lives in Singapore Singapore
Has a website at sims.smugmug.com
Joined on Feb 16, 2013

Comments

Total: 270, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (374 comments in total)
In reply to:

tonywong: Image 8 of 98 shows the horrible horrible effect of the electronic rolling shutter.

That stick is totally bent. Sony needs to fix this immediately.

#notbuyingnow

@tonywong
Brilliant. Thanks for the laugh ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 08:57 UTC
On article Sony a9 first look videos (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter Dhaeze: With a Canon EOS 1DX mark II I can shoot 60fps 8.8 Mp JPEG's with 'tracking', without blackout and completely silent (=4K video MJPG). What is so special with the 20 fps 24 Mp Sony A9 when you need the exact right moment? With 60 fps the hit chance is much higher. Not?

Let's have a think...
8MPX compressed jpeg (w/ 1.34x crop)
vs.
24MPX uncompressed RAW (no crop)

Yes, definitely the first ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 10:34 UTC
In reply to:

Rob Sims: It's amazing how iPad sales (and tablets in general) has followed a similar lifecycle as netbooks during the mid-2000s. I remember how sales boomed and soon every man and his dog had one, because they were cheaper than and smaller than laptops... but that fad died as fully flegged laptops themselves became cheaper and thinner (perhaps due to removal of optical drives and intel eventually releasing lower voltage Core2 CPUs).

To be fair, tablets have done better than netbooks, I know many people who upgraded from their first table to a better (smaller or more powerful) one 3-4 years later (I never heard anyone replace their netbook with another one)... but the problem still remains, they are mostly (but not solely) used for media consumption, and any iPad from the last 4 years is still plenty good enough for that still.

Netbooks sales took off in 2008, and grew by something like 800% in 2009, but we're already flat by 2010 and fell ever since. Whatever niche they filled (and I do agree with you that they filled the cheap but good enough for Internet niche), I'd still call them fad.

However, I don't think it was just tablets that killed them.Sales we're already tanking BEFORE the first iPad arrived in mid-2010, but it wasn't until mid-2011 with the iPad 2 that tablet sales started to take off. I think netbooks were on their way out due to poorer user experience than promised (terrible performance even in WinXP!) and manufacturers turning away from them due to low profit margins.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2017 at 12:40 UTC
In reply to:

ottonis: Apple lowering prices of the new iPad means that iPad sales must be in serious trouble.
Moreover, why are they using a CPU from yesteryear?

@Najinsky
"Android certainly seems to be dominating Apple in the unused tablet market"
I think you just won this comment section ;-)

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 11:06 UTC

Out here in Singapore it's already common for international schools to request students have an iPad AND a MacBook (that's the policy for the Canadian International school, for example). The iPad works effectively as a digital text book and the school/homework is done on the MacBook (IT support is apparently easier for the school to keep on top of if every student uses the same OS). I can imagine that once tablets get into the Sub $150 area in years to come, this will start to become the norm in state schools also, instead of the preserve of the private schools.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 08:58 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies

It's amazing how iPad sales (and tablets in general) has followed a similar lifecycle as netbooks during the mid-2000s. I remember how sales boomed and soon every man and his dog had one, because they were cheaper than and smaller than laptops... but that fad died as fully flegged laptops themselves became cheaper and thinner (perhaps due to removal of optical drives and intel eventually releasing lower voltage Core2 CPUs).

To be fair, tablets have done better than netbooks, I know many people who upgraded from their first table to a better (smaller or more powerful) one 3-4 years later (I never heard anyone replace their netbook with another one)... but the problem still remains, they are mostly (but not solely) used for media consumption, and any iPad from the last 4 years is still plenty good enough for that still.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 08:51 UTC as 17th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

aliasfox: So it's an iPad Air 1 with a processor that's comparable (but probably much cheaper) to the one in the iPad Air 2. I don't begrudge the processor choice at an entry level price point, but why go back to the Air 1 size and screen? Does Apple have a warehouse of Air 1 enclosures still lying around?

No, Aliasfox is right, it's effectively an iPad Air 1 enclosure, and screen assembly:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/11215/apple-announces-2017-ipad-97inch-329

Also, the Air2 had an A8X which is effectively a 3 core version of the A8. Comparisons to between the A8X and A9 (just google them) show the A9 significantly faster at single threaded, and pretty similar overall at multithreaded (sometimes faster, sometimes slower). Overall it's probably the right SOC for an entry priced iPad.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 08:42 UTC
In reply to:

HeyItsJoel: Instead of innovation, Apple is reduced to using gimmicks to drum up sales. I really miss Steve Jobs.

A +20% battery size increase (from 27.3Wh to 34.2Wh) at the same time as a -35% price decrease (from $499 to $329) is a gimmick?

There's no pleasing some people ;-)

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 02:11 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: The important question is... does this new iPad have a headphone port?

Yes it does.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 02:06 UTC

Anyone else just scroll straight down to the comments section?

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2017 at 05:56 UTC as 8th comment | 1 reply
On article Throwback Thursday: the Nikon D80 (244 comments in total)

At the time the D80 came out, every new generation of camera was a huge leap forward for digital photography... quite different from the smaller increments we get today. Not being cynical, just that all the low hanging fruit has already been harvested and basically every dSLR/mirrorless camera available today is already excellent.

I remember upgrading from a D50 to a D80 and was hugely impressed with the improved handling, and noticeable improvement in image quality - even if most of that was from increased resultion (6mpx to 10mpx). Only the jump to the D700 years later gave me the same feeling of technological leap.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 13:39 UTC as 79th comment
On article Leica M10 real-world sample gallery (345 comments in total)
In reply to:

JakeB: There's just a certain 'something' about those shots. An aura. A 'feeling.'

It would be ridiculous to suggest that any other manufacturer's camera/lens combinations costing a tenth of the price could create this 'look.'

It's almost like Leica sprinkled a little, well, let's call it 'pixie dust' into their cameras and lenses and that magic travels along the lens to the sensor and is captured along with the rays of light.

Or perhaps the sensor itself contains this pixie dust and thus imbues the image with the 'aura.'

No matter how it works, one can immediately spot this 'Leica look' that no other camera is capable of creating. It positively glows from each image.

Money well spent, I'd say.

@kristof93/Photo_AK
Definition of "satire":
noun - the use of humour, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2017 at 12:58 UTC
In reply to:

Rob Sims: If shooting photos is a hobby, and the experience and satisfaction of taking photos is half the fun, then what's so wrong about a bit of luxury while doing so? If I wasn't supporting a family I'd be straight onto the pre-order page. For now I'll continue with my poor man's Leica (Summarit m lenses on my Sony A7), but there's no reason for me to stop dreaming ;-)

@BrianRoger
I'm sure we're in good company ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 16:23 UTC
In reply to:

Rob Sims: If shooting photos is a hobby, and the experience and satisfaction of taking photos is half the fun, then what's so wrong about a bit of luxury while doing so? If I wasn't supporting a family I'd be straight onto the pre-order page. For now I'll continue with my poor man's Leica (Summarit m lenses on my Sony A7), but there's no reason for me to stop dreaming ;-)

I'm a bit disappointed, but not at all surprised, by all the snidy comments below. I for one love that there's so much diversity still within the digital photography world (dslrs, mirrorless, range finders, camera phones). Live and let live.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 03:06 UTC

If shooting photos is a hobby, and the experience and satisfaction of taking photos is half the fun, then what's so wrong about a bit of luxury while doing so? If I wasn't supporting a family I'd be straight onto the pre-order page. For now I'll continue with my poor man's Leica (Summarit m lenses on my Sony A7), but there's no reason for me to stop dreaming ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 03:01 UTC as 140th comment | 6 replies
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600 (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

Slouch Hooligan: Every announcement of a new DSLR triggers responses from the mirrorless acolytes. Mirrorless does have advantages in camera body size which pleases those with tiny hands. These same mirrorless acolytes consistently fail to mention that lens size is a function of sensor size, which sharply mitigates any advantage of mirrorless. Not to mention the battery life brevity for mirrorless.
One may like apples without disparaging oranges.

@Stanchung
CIPA battery figures do not reflect real world use. Google this yourself will save you the trouble of many future arguments. (Eg. Do you really use on board flash?!)

Before my first mirrorless camera I used to shoot weddings professionally with a pair of Nikon D700s and a backup D90. Charging up all at the beginning was typically enough to get me through the day.

Switching to mirrorless meant I needed to carry a few spare batteries for security, but typically only used one or two in total, and on a number of weddings I've not had to use any. So don't quote 5-6 batteries for each camera, because that is completely fictional.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2017 at 06:49 UTC
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600 (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

Slouch Hooligan: Every announcement of a new DSLR triggers responses from the mirrorless acolytes. Mirrorless does have advantages in camera body size which pleases those with tiny hands. These same mirrorless acolytes consistently fail to mention that lens size is a function of sensor size, which sharply mitigates any advantage of mirrorless. Not to mention the battery life brevity for mirrorless.
One may like apples without disparaging oranges.

@Slouch Hooligan
A dignified response. Well done for not stooping to level of some of the venomous replies above!

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2017 at 00:54 UTC
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600 (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

Slouch Hooligan: Every announcement of a new DSLR triggers responses from the mirrorless acolytes. Mirrorless does have advantages in camera body size which pleases those with tiny hands. These same mirrorless acolytes consistently fail to mention that lens size is a function of sensor size, which sharply mitigates any advantage of mirrorless. Not to mention the battery life brevity for mirrorless.
One may like apples without disparaging oranges.

@Peter Lacus
Also battery life and C-AF performance (although the later is now somewhat questionable).

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 06:01 UTC
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600 (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

Slouch Hooligan: Every announcement of a new DSLR triggers responses from the mirrorless acolytes. Mirrorless does have advantages in camera body size which pleases those with tiny hands. These same mirrorless acolytes consistently fail to mention that lens size is a function of sensor size, which sharply mitigates any advantage of mirrorless. Not to mention the battery life brevity for mirrorless.
One may like apples without disparaging oranges.

@stanchung
Everyone has a right to an opinion, but if you fill that opinion with false facts (e.g. That lenses for mirror less cameras have to be the same size as for a dSLR) then be prepared to be pulled up on that. People may miss your intended message, but that's rather a result of deliberate misinformation within your message.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 13:32 UTC
On article CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600 (322 comments in total)

The budget sector of dSLR used to be exciting because tech from higher up the range flowed down, especially sensor tech during the mid-2000s (remember when the lowly the D50 came out cheap and got the D70S sensor, or when the D80 got the D200 sensor...etc) - so that each upgrade saw a material improvement. I guess now it's just the cash cow that funds R&D for tech deployed elsewhere. Certainly it doesn't seem anywhere as exciting as it used to be.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 03:50 UTC as 36th comment
Total: 270, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »