Rob Sims

Rob Sims

Lives in Singapore Singapore
Has a website at sims.smugmug.com
Joined on Feb 16, 2013

Comments

Total: 284, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Sirandar: And no absolutely no smartphone should be able to take a picture under any circumstances without making you aware of it.

If Apple Android and all smartphone makers had any common sense this would be true.

They shouldn’t be, that’s in the terms of the iOS App Store, so any apps that do are malicious and shouldn’t make it through the screening process. In any case, just be safe and switch off access to the camera, microphone, gps for any apps you download that don’t strictly need it. This is done in the main setting area.

Not sure about Android, I’d imagine it’s similar.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2017 at 00:48 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): Who care about Wacom,... your macbook won't be able to work with macOS High Sierra.
😬

You can check compatibility here:
https://support.apple.com/en-sg/HT201475

Link | Posted on Sep 26, 2017 at 11:52 UTC
In reply to:

paolopan83: No sensor stabilization? Why would someone buy this?

@bambi24 - people can vblog on a smartphone typically with a Bluetooth mic. This camera doesn't have a mic input, and I assume no Bluetooth mic option, so not really suitable for vblogging.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 12:17 UTC
In reply to:

Northgrove: How can a customer looking at APS-C sensors also be a customer looking for a 15-45mm f/3.5-6.3 lens? Yes, it's to keep it small, but then why wouldn't you go for a faster lens on a smaller sensor, probably making the whole package both cheaper and lighter as well? I can't say I really understand this concept compared with established micro four thirds designs existing. Flexibility in case you later want faster APS-C lenses? No, because then the setup's weight will be badly unbalanced and generally uncomfortable to use.

@Bambi24 - this camera has no mic input, so not suitable for vblogging. You'd get a better result from any smartphone and a Bluetooth mic than trying to use this.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 12:13 UTC
In reply to:

Rob Sims: Hold on... didn't Sony basically release the same camera back in Aug 2014 with the A5100, effectively an A6000 w/o the EVF?

Why didn't Canon just put the dual pixel sensor from the 70D (released in 2013!) on their EOS-M and be done with it? What has Canon been doing for last four years?!

@Sdaniella. Exactly, they've had this technology in production for four years already, why did it take them so long to deploy it? Surely they lost four years of advantage to Sony by reserving it only for their high end.

Look at Sony, when they developed on-sensor PDAF, they deployed it immediately across the range, including the entry-level NEX-5R, released August 2012 (btw, that had a touch screen). Their current aging entry level model, the A5100, now has 179 Phase-Detect Points spread across almost the entire sensor, and also has a touchscreen... since 2014! There are benefits for Dual-pixel (although current on-sensor PDAF is pretty close), I'm sure Sony and other manufacturers will follow suit, but Canon have been sitting on this for FOUR years!

Aside from Dual-pixel vs. PDAF discussion (not all one sided as you might think). I don't see how this camera is any better than what Sony released four years ago... and where are the lenses?

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 09:54 UTC

Hold on... didn't Sony basically release the same camera back in Aug 2014 with the A5100, effectively an A6000 w/o the EVF?

Why didn't Canon just put the dual pixel sensor from the 70D (released in 2013!) on their EOS-M and be done with it? What has Canon been doing for last four years?!

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 08:31 UTC as 139th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Thermidor: That's rich. People bragging about iPhone bokeh, when they're just badly done gaussian blur effects. I'd rather take a cellphone shot with no background blurring than obviously fake bokeh. Try shooting with a light source in the frame and you'll start seeing just how awful and tacky it looks. Worse still when people take an obviously wide shot and blur everything else out but themselves.

At least the Huawei P9/P10's dual cameras uses one camera to take an in-focus shot, and the other way out of focus to composite them together to generate real background blur.

You don't know what you're talking about.

The iPhone 7 Plus cameras discussed in the article uses the 56mm equiv tele lens for the main photo, with 2nd wide angle lens overlaid to create a multi-step depth map. The "badly done gaussian blur effect" you talk about, is currently best in class, and when viewed on social media does a pretty convincing job. Also, forcing users to compose with the 56mm alone reduces the facial distortion that plague most smartphone portraits taken with a typical 28mm rear camera.

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2017 at 01:47 UTC
In reply to:

nicolaiecostel: What a terrible piece of optics. They must have designed it in 2001 and forgot the folder in a drawer. Or maybe it was designed by that group of interns they hired last month. Or maybe they commisioned Mitakon or Voightlander to design and make this lens.

I had a Tokina 12-24 f/4 in about 2009, it was an aging lens at the time, and I think it was about as bad as this one.

Either that or they wanted to build a chromatic aberation simulator.

Hey, don't taint Voigtlander's name in this. They have some excellent optical and construction quality ultra-wide angle lenses (see their 10mm, 12mm and 15mm manual full frame lenses as examples).

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2017 at 02:12 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rob Sims: I was once a guest at wedding in Poland where a very friendly photographer was taking candid shots of the guests before the evening reception. After half an hour or so it was announced that the bride a groom would be arriving shortly, so all the guests lined up and the photographer got in the ready position to document their big arrival. When the doors opened and they stepped through, there was a hushed gasp from the photographer, who stopped shooting, rushed to the corner of her room where her bag was, and checked her mobile phone. 30 seconds later she could be seen sprinting out of the courtyard to her car. Turns out she'd mistaken the venue and was photographing the wrong guests!

I never did find out if she made it to the correct wedding on time, but I did feel very sorry for her!

To this day I'm still wondering whether it was the arrival of the (unfamiliar) couple that made her realise, or the fact that there was another wedding photographer in tow. I'm guessing she'd been very professional to switch her mobile to silent for the ceremony, but can't help thinking that that might have been her undoing!

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 05:59 UTC
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (273 comments in total)

I was once a guest at wedding in Poland where a very friendly photographer was taking candid shots of the guests before the evening reception. After half an hour or so it was announced that the bride a groom would be arriving shortly, so all the guests lined up and the photographer got in the ready position to document their big arrival. When the doors opened and they stepped through, there was a hushed gasp from the photographer, who stopped shooting, rushed to the corner of her room where her bag was, and checked her mobile phone. 30 seconds later she could be seen sprinting out of the courtyard to her car. Turns out she'd mistaken the venue and was photographing the wrong guests!

I never did find out if she made it to the correct wedding on time, but I did feel very sorry for her!

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 05:49 UTC as 40th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Rob Sims: I feel misled. The title states: "The good, the bad and the ugly", however I've looked through all the photos and cannot find anything ugly.

(joking aside, great read)

...and in fact, I can't see anything bad either.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 01:37 UTC

I feel misled. The title states: "The good, the bad and the ugly", however I've looked through all the photos and cannot find anything ugly.

(joking aside, great read)

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2017 at 09:02 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply
On article Cage match: iPhone 7 Plus vs. Arri Alexa (14 comments in total)

Actually quite enjoyed that video. Done in a lighthearted way, but clearly by someone who does seem to have a clue what he's talking about.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 12:54 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM sample gallery (96 comments in total)
In reply to:

goactive: Very over priced lens. I have the new Tamron 10-24 and the images from it look much sharper and have great color on my Nikon D500

Are you really comparing the Tamron 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 (APS-C lens) with the Sony 16-35/F2.8 (Full Frame)?

About the only thing these lenses have in common is the equiv FOV.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 08:53 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (557 comments in total)
In reply to:

tonywong: Image 8 of 98 shows the horrible horrible effect of the electronic rolling shutter.

That stick is totally bent. Sony needs to fix this immediately.

#notbuyingnow

@tonywong
Brilliant. Thanks for the laugh ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 08:57 UTC
On article Sony a9 first look videos (301 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter Dhaeze: With a Canon EOS 1DX mark II I can shoot 60fps 8.8 Mp JPEG's with 'tracking', without blackout and completely silent (=4K video MJPG). What is so special with the 20 fps 24 Mp Sony A9 when you need the exact right moment? With 60 fps the hit chance is much higher. Not?

Let's have a think...
8MPX compressed jpeg (w/ 1.34x crop)
vs.
24MPX uncompressed RAW (no crop)

Yes, definitely the first ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 10:34 UTC
In reply to:

Rob Sims: It's amazing how iPad sales (and tablets in general) has followed a similar lifecycle as netbooks during the mid-2000s. I remember how sales boomed and soon every man and his dog had one, because they were cheaper than and smaller than laptops... but that fad died as fully flegged laptops themselves became cheaper and thinner (perhaps due to removal of optical drives and intel eventually releasing lower voltage Core2 CPUs).

To be fair, tablets have done better than netbooks, I know many people who upgraded from their first table to a better (smaller or more powerful) one 3-4 years later (I never heard anyone replace their netbook with another one)... but the problem still remains, they are mostly (but not solely) used for media consumption, and any iPad from the last 4 years is still plenty good enough for that still.

Netbooks sales took off in 2008, and grew by something like 800% in 2009, but we're already flat by 2010 and fell ever since. Whatever niche they filled (and I do agree with you that they filled the cheap but good enough for Internet niche), I'd still call them fad.

However, I don't think it was just tablets that killed them.Sales we're already tanking BEFORE the first iPad arrived in mid-2010, but it wasn't until mid-2011 with the iPad 2 that tablet sales started to take off. I think netbooks were on their way out due to poorer user experience than promised (terrible performance even in WinXP!) and manufacturers turning away from them due to low profit margins.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2017 at 12:40 UTC
In reply to:

ottonis: Apple lowering prices of the new iPad means that iPad sales must be in serious trouble.
Moreover, why are they using a CPU from yesteryear?

@Najinsky
"Android certainly seems to be dominating Apple in the unused tablet market"
I think you just won this comment section ;-)

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 11:06 UTC

Out here in Singapore it's already common for international schools to request students have an iPad AND a MacBook (that's the policy for the Canadian International school, for example). The iPad works effectively as a digital text book and the school/homework is done on the MacBook (IT support is apparently easier for the school to keep on top of if every student uses the same OS). I can imagine that once tablets get into the Sub $150 area in years to come, this will start to become the norm in state schools also, instead of the preserve of the private schools.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 08:58 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies

It's amazing how iPad sales (and tablets in general) has followed a similar lifecycle as netbooks during the mid-2000s. I remember how sales boomed and soon every man and his dog had one, because they were cheaper than and smaller than laptops... but that fad died as fully flegged laptops themselves became cheaper and thinner (perhaps due to removal of optical drives and intel eventually releasing lower voltage Core2 CPUs).

To be fair, tablets have done better than netbooks, I know many people who upgraded from their first table to a better (smaller or more powerful) one 3-4 years later (I never heard anyone replace their netbook with another one)... but the problem still remains, they are mostly (but not solely) used for media consumption, and any iPad from the last 4 years is still plenty good enough for that still.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 08:51 UTC as 17th comment | 3 replies
Total: 284, showing: 1 – 20
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