NCB

Joined on Mar 19, 2013

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Total: 155, showing: 1 – 20
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On article 2017 Roundup: Consumer Long Zoom Compacts (129 comments in total)

Would have liked to have seen the Nikon B700 in there as well. Only 60% of the weight of P900 and distinctly smaller, but still has a 60x zoom and uses the same sensor as the P900.

I have the P900 and it's awesome, for what it manages to do. But as an all-in-one travel companion the B700 could be a better bet, and it would be useful to see how it stacked up against the FZ300 and the other offerings.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2017 at 16:24 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
On article Nikon D3: The camera that changed everything (208 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Name is Bond: It needs two 'k's or 'ck' to be Nick-on. Otherwise it's monty python: the photographers who say 'Ni con'.

Depends what flavour of Brit you are; vowels vary enormously. Those in the more Celtic areas tend to use short vowels and don't slur them; I say Tom-a-toe.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 16:05 UTC
In reply to:

NCB: Whatever Nikon or Canon do, it has to have a selling point. You can take top image quality from them for granted, which always helps, but they need something distinctive to take on the opposition, especially if they're asking for non-bargain-basement prices. And they have to have quality throughout, starting with a top quality built-in EVF.

Me, I'm a happy DSLR user. The only thing which would appeal to me would be something fairly compact and light, but which still handles well (good grip), with good controls and quality EVF, and a few relatively light and compact native lenses. Something which can replace the premium compact in my rucksack without too much of a size/weight penalty, and which provides an enjoyable shooting experience. But that's just me.

Was talking about potential offerings from Nikon. Sony? Personally I prefer Nikon colour, and colour to me is a big deal. So I'd be interested in the right mirrorless offering from Nikon.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 18:12 UTC

Whatever Nikon or Canon do, it has to have a selling point. You can take top image quality from them for granted, which always helps, but they need something distinctive to take on the opposition, especially if they're asking for non-bargain-basement prices. And they have to have quality throughout, starting with a top quality built-in EVF.

Me, I'm a happy DSLR user. The only thing which would appeal to me would be something fairly compact and light, but which still handles well (good grip), with good controls and quality EVF, and a few relatively light and compact native lenses. Something which can replace the premium compact in my rucksack without too much of a size/weight penalty, and which provides an enjoyable shooting experience. But that's just me.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 15:09 UTC as 113th comment | 3 replies
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (792 comments in total)

Bought the Nikon F601 26 years ago, and it still gets used. For over 12 years it went in my rucksack on every backpacking trip, only giving way to digital. One of the smaller Nikon SLRs of the period, but feels terrific in the hand. It would feel familiar to the modern DSLR user; very good hand grip, metering and mode choices, etc. A joy to use.

When Nikon ditched (almost all) film cameras, I picked up an F75 cheaply as backup, but it didn't feel the same and never gets used.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 17:39 UTC as 288th comment
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (792 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: The Yashica FX or Contax RTS series are worth consideration, because they give you entry to the Zeiss T* lenses made for that mount. The Contax models were also made by Yashica, but are more pro-looking and more stylish, designed by Porsche. The Yashica glass was also darned good.

If they died on you why did you keep buying them? Can't talk about Contax but my FX3 is still going after 27 years.

Also have a Yashica T4 compact (35mm Zeiss lens), one of the best film compacts ever, but the T4 still commands quite high prices (3 figures). The Contax G1/G2 rangefinders fetch very high prices.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 17:31 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (792 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: The Yashica FX or Contax RTS series are worth consideration, because they give you entry to the Zeiss T* lenses made for that mount. The Contax models were also made by Yashica, but are more pro-looking and more stylish, designed by Porsche. The Yashica glass was also darned good.

Dead right. I have a Yashica FX3 Super 2000, paired with a Zeiss 50mm f1.7. Great combination. Basic metered manual; you have to remember to wind the film on, set aperture and speed, and focus, but the metering is spot on. Joy to use; I still use it.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 17:03 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Olympus C-8080 Wide Zoom (92 comments in total)

Seriously considered the C-8080, was highly impressed with the specs. Was into landscape photography and wanted something convenient to take up mountains. While dithering the Nikon 8400 came out, 24-85 lens but less than 2/3 the weight and it would easily fit in a rucksack pocket; I bought it, still have it and use it. I know of people who bought the C-8080 and likewise still have it and use it though. Both cracking cameras.

Often wondered why Olympus didn't continue to develop that line. Nikon brought out the D40 and decided that that was the way to go rather than high end compacts.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 18:38 UTC as 38th comment | 1 reply
On article 2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras around $500 (344 comments in total)

In the T6 review, there's the statement:
"Its closest competitors in the category, both of which are getting rather long in the tooth, are the 24MP Nikon D3300 and Sony's a5100."

Why D3300? Why not the recent D3400?

Link | Posted on May 12, 2017 at 19:18 UTC as 16th comment | 4 replies

Those JPGs look fine to me. Like the colour. The overall balance is pretty good, and Panasonic is particularly good with browns of one sort or another.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2017 at 20:43 UTC as 47th comment
On article Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM sample gallery (142 comments in total)

Nice

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 20:49 UTC as 24th comment
On article 2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $500-900 (546 comments in total)

Couple of strange things about these reviews:

(1) why no Nikon D3400? Great image quality, good handling, good guide mode, good value for money. If you shove in the T7i then the D3400 ought to be in there.

(2) Don't get the love affair with Fuji. I have the X-E2S and it has some of the least attractive colour I've come across (compared to Nikon, Canon, Pentax, Panasonic). Dynamic range is comparatively poor, handling is more about looks than substance, and the EVF is no more than adequate.

Link | Posted on May 5, 2017 at 18:48 UTC as 28th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: I still use my D700 for some things and it's close to 10 years old. It's like the film camera business model where you spend a lot and want your money's worth.

When cameras were 2 megapixels, it made sense to buy and buy. The high prices for those early cameras indicate some consumers agreed. But now, a decent camera is so good that an "upgrade" isn't an upgrade. Of course there is always the enthusiast who wants the stereo with 16 speakers but companies can't rely on that.

Even at 2Mp I didn't buy and buy. The Nikon 800 I bought in 2000 gave such good images that I waited until resolution (linear) doubled, buying a Nikon 8400 in 2005. A good decision; it's still my favourite stick-in-rucksack-pocket camera.

It's not all disaster for the camera manufacturers though. In ILCs I've bought Nikon D80, D3100, Df, D5500, Panasonic G1, Fuji X-E2s... Strangely, it's the newest, the D5500 and X-E2S, that I've moved on; newer doesn't mean better (for me).

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 22:54 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T7i / 800D review (383 comments in total)

Is it just me, or is all this hand-holding of "casual or beginning photographers" a load of rubbish, which just clutters up a camera and makes it harder to use? I have the same problem with Canon manuals, which talk down to their audience.

Photography is basically simple. It can be explained in a few lines, along with a few recommendations as to what settings to use to get started. That way, would-be photographers get into it straight away, rather than trudge through a mire of waffle with the promise of being able to move on at some undefined point in the future "when they're ready". The latter probably puts off as many people as it helps.

KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid!

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 21:04 UTC as 60th comment
In reply to:

Father Bouvier: So, it's a wide gamut monitor. What for? The internet and practically everything else is standardized on sRGB. And worse, most browsers and other software ignore color profiles completely. You may be proud of great edit on your monitor, but 99.9% of the world will see completely screwed up colors.

But actually, the situation is even worse than that. I recently looked at 10 popular devices (phones, tables, laptops). They all had their color profiles out of whack, all overly saturated and contrasty.

Bottom line. What you see on your wide gamut calibrated monitor is completely different from what the rest of the world sees on their phones and tablets.

True. But that's true no matter what monitor you use. So you might as well use a top quality one, because somebody out there might just be using something of comparable performance.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 19:25 UTC
On article Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery (557 comments in total)

Looks like a very capable camera with the colors of a consumer-orientated point-and-shoot.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 16:27 UTC as 110th comment | 2 replies
On article Sphere of frustration: Nikon KeyMission 360 review (199 comments in total)

Good review. Interesting device, in spite of the software flaws and limitations. Those can be solved, if Nikon chooses to do so.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 16:20 UTC as 65th comment | 2 replies

Is it just me, or are these pics not very good?

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 16:20 UTC as 11th comment | 8 replies
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (269 comments in total)
In reply to:

marioaguila: SUCCESSOR OF THE D7200?
No. Not by far.
FIRST: D7200 has 24 megapixel resolution versus 20 of the D7500. Concrete Effect: 20% less resolution complicates cropping or cropping, as it reduces the pixel density by 20%.
SECOND: It lacks a second memory card. Effect: You can not use a second card as a replacement or to have more memory, or to use an Eye-Fi.
THIRD: No grip for vertical shots and second battery
-------------
ALLEGED BENEFITS OF D7500
Video 4K? Until when the geeks believe that the photographers are interested in the video that comes with the camera. If you do not have not notice.
8 photos per second versus 6, for burst shooting? About 10% of the photographers may be interested. Not me.
Tilting touchscreen display. Interesting, but does not compensate for losses in Resolution and External Memory.
Last word. Please please don't compare it with the D500, that I don't like also. D7500 is supposed to conquer the D7200 owners, that already decided not to change to the D500

For real world photography, 20Mp is fine. Very few users use or need a second memory card. Likewise the vertical grip. Users who demand the last two will go for the D500 anyway.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2017 at 17:23 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (537 comments in total)

20Mp a move in the right direction; easily enough for DX.

Wonder if this heralds a move away from Sony sensors. Maybe a good idea for a lot of reasons.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 17:50 UTC as 53rd comment | 5 replies
Total: 155, showing: 1 – 20
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