iatttmp

Joined on Aug 2, 2014

Comments

Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11
On article DPReview TV: OM System 20mm F1.4 Pro review (381 comments in total)

If you're really in need of quick switching between Auto and Manual Focus, you can use the switch on the E-M1 to do that. It's actually very handy. You can auto focus, hit the switch and manual focus from there. If it had a manual focus clutch and you used it, the focus distance would change when you hit the clutch. I have one lens with the clutch (12-40 f2.8) and I much prefer the switch to the clutch.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2021 at 20:26 UTC as 30th comment | 2 replies

I don't understand all the trepidation expressed in these comments. This is a great day to see that the new organization is on the bit and ready to run with new product. They're saucy and attentive to market pressures. What more could we ask following a take-over like this?

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2021 at 15:36 UTC as 77th comment | 4 replies

Ridiculous.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2021 at 20:43 UTC as 72nd comment
On article Opinion: Do we really need all those buttons and dials? (890 comments in total)
In reply to:

Entropius: I have a D500 with a dead LCD. The camera works fine, and it is a testament to Nikon's design that I can operate the camera with no LCD.

All I need: shutter speed (front dial), aperture (rear dial), ISO (there's a button), the ability to control autofocus mode (there's a button), and the ability to set autofocus point (there's a control).

Hi mmx. People get stuck on technology that they were successful with. The testament I was talking about was the one to the writer's comfort with the picture-taking workflow connected to using an optical viewfinder on a tank like the D500, slapping mirror and all. To me, the only reason for sticking with SLRs is just that comfort because, let's face it, photography has always been about the available technology making it easier and easier to produce better and better images in various situations that please those who would view them. If you need arms like Schwarzenegger to take pictures, you might try to explain your interest to others, but to suggest that it's a great way to shoot pictures is also a testament to your misunderstanding of others' likely inclinations.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2021 at 15:32 UTC
On article Opinion: Do we really need all those buttons and dials? (890 comments in total)
In reply to:

Entropius: I have a D500 with a dead LCD. The camera works fine, and it is a testament to Nikon's design that I can operate the camera with no LCD.

All I need: shutter speed (front dial), aperture (rear dial), ISO (there's a button), the ability to control autofocus mode (there's a button), and the ability to set autofocus point (there's a control).

There will always be SLR advocates, whether digital or not. Your D500 is a testament to a technology that is mercifully dying - flapping mirrors and optical viewfinders. That you like it is another kind of testament.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2021 at 18:01 UTC
On article Opinion: Do we really need all those buttons and dials? (890 comments in total)

The point is not that there are too many buttons and dials, it's that people think that they're somehow required to use all of them. I set up my cameras to do the few things I need (which is way more than a stupid phone camera) and disable the rest of the programmable features. If manufacturers make their guess as to what people need by limiting the access points, they're limiting their camera sales to people who like their choices.

For example, I would not buy a major camera without a rear dial because I need at least two to use my main mode choice, aperture priority - one dial for aperture, one for exposure compensation. I hear there are people who don't use exposure compensation. Olympus cameras show blow-out and black-out areas live, so I can tune in extremely accurate exposure without hardly thinking about it, if the exposure comp dial is under my thumb.

Conclusion: don't advocate for anyone else's version of simplicity but your own because you're bound to disagree.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2021 at 17:54 UTC as 303rd comment | 1 reply

This is good work. Thanks.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2020 at 15:45 UTC as 46th comment

The Canon 5D classic.

I ditched my Canon gear in favour of MFT back in 2014. I'm not sorry I did that, but I always felt that the original 5D was the quintessential analog-to-digital conversion with little functionality beyond the basics needed to expose quality images on that full frame sensor with huge pixels. So I tumbled: last summer, I bought an old 5D and an EF 24-105 IS L lens. It's gigantic (compared to an Olympus E-M1 with a suitable lens mounted) and weighs a ton but it's like the meat and potatoes of digital photography.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2020 at 21:06 UTC as 98th comment

This is almost too ironic to bear, DPReview speaking against unnecessary upgrading. Upgrades are the lifeblood of camera developers. They work hard to avoid the use of words such as "disappointing" and "uncompetitive" in new camera reviews. I always wondered how people imagine my camera takes worse pictures than the day I bought it because a new model is available. As far as I'm concerned, the EM1 Mk 1 is a great camera and the 5D classic is exceptional. However, my Canon G5 X Mkii is on it's way. ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2020 at 20:37 UTC as 19th comment

The guy clearly didn't have the same goals and production requirements as the others who are likely uploading pictures as they shoot. The other thing is that the value of his images doesn't depend on the kooky camera but on him; he just happens to like a more traditional process. (I say "kooky" with great respect.) I'm kinda surprised there wasn't a sketch artist slashing away at a pad of paper. I hope we're going to see his pictures soon.

Link | Posted on Nov 14, 2019 at 03:09 UTC as 77th comment | 2 replies

I get that these are good photos and that the global community to should bear witness to the horrors of ebola, or any distant tragedy for that matter. That's what photo journalism is all about, right?.

However, I don't get that these are somehow worthy of some prestigious international award. I expect to be artistically inspired as well as informed by photo journalism.(Maybe I'm expecting too much, or art is not the point at all.) The Readers' Showcase by Janne Voutilainen, for example, is way more interesting to me.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2015 at 14:36 UTC as 6th comment
Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11