Bilgy_no1

Bilgy_no1

Lives in Netherlands Amsterdam, Netherlands
Works as a Manager
Joined on May 22, 2008

Comments

Total: 87, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Martian Keyboard: .
OK, - we see what is happening on that planet.
So I wonder if we can learn anything from this photo, that can be applied to our
own planet.
The photo all by itself could be loaded with information that even
a regular common person can gain. E.g. maybe cyclones on earth have
some affinity for existing more towards the poles, and less at the equator.
That's a fair observation.

We did already learn a lot about Earth's atmosphere by the outstanding Earth Sciences department at NASA, and other scientific programs at NOAA, EPA, DOE, etc.

Unfortunately, the Greedy Oligarchs Party is defunding these programs, because they don't want us to know about human driven climate change. Knowledge could only lead mankind to action and that would cost their oil and coal peddling sponsors some of their wealth...

Link | Posted on May 30, 2017 at 22:05 UTC
In reply to:

Nicolas06: So each year 56 million humans die.

Ischaemic heart disease and Stroke combined are more than 15 millions death
Road accidents alone are 1.3 millions death
Death by falling is around 750000. (By the way a friend of my father killed himself by falling from his roof)
Drug abuse is a bit less than 100000 a year.

Then there the things that almost never happen like being killed by a shark or by shaking a faulty food distributor that fall on you.

And among that last category, there are the models that get killed while on railway tracks for a photo shooting because instead of well organizing the shot like doing it on tracks that are not used, or organizing that with the local railstation or rail company they did crap.

And so this the key cause many have been decided to fight against ... By commenting on it each model on a railway photo they can find... So they are sure the photo is given max visibility and the willingness to set up a similar shot increase.

We live in a strange world.

@StevenE
All human beings are susceptible to death. Period.

But not all heart failure is the same. Much of that is caused by bad diets, air pollution, work related stress or smoking. Causes that are entirely in the sphere of human influence, just like standing on a train track or not.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 12:55 UTC

These numbers are quite different from earlier years when Apple regularly made 99% of the total profits.

The sheer amounts Apple rakes in each quarter are really abnormal in such a competitive market. Kind of defies the standard business school textbooks...

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 20:50 UTC as 17th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Dragonrider: One thing that isn't clear is whether Sony sold more sensors or whether they just charged more for them (like they did with cameras). If it was the latter, then the pain will show up in their sensor customers' financials (e.g. Richoh, Fuji, and Nikon and maybe Apple).

The article suggests that the 40% year-on-year increase of image sensors is largely attributable to phones. It seems unlikely that this is solely achieved by price hikes.

Sony sensors are becoming a bit more visible in the spec sheet. Previously it was just '8MP main camera' whereas it will now state 'Sony IMX3xx 12MP image sensor'. This means that manufacturers perceive it as a plus to mention that in the marketing material. That would warrant a higher price, but surely not 40%. It could also lead to a bigger demand, because manufacturers don't want to use components that are perceived as inferior. Bit like the Intel effect.

Could also be that Sony is giving a discount if manufacturers mention the Sony camera sensor explicitly.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2017 at 11:48 UTC
In reply to:

Dragonrider: One thing that isn't clear is whether Sony sold more sensors or whether they just charged more for them (like they did with cameras). If it was the latter, then the pain will show up in their sensor customers' financials (e.g. Richoh, Fuji, and Nikon and maybe Apple).

Sony sells imaging sensor modules to almost every major smartphone OEM (and ODMs as well). There are not many big competitors out there if you look at what almost all of the best selling phones are equipped with.

The image sensor sales include these smartphone modules.

OmniVision is the biggest one after Sony, with a focus on the lower end of the market. They sometimes supply the front facing camera for high end models. Toshiba and SK Hynix are smaller players. Samsung caters mostly to its own phone business, but also supplies to some other manufacturers.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2017 at 21:29 UTC
In reply to:

faterikcartman: I love Trump and believe most of MMGW theory to be junk science. That said, the comments suggests Von Wong is making art with a camera and pushing all the right buttons. I'm not such a crusader as to believe realistic photojournalism is the end-all-be-all in photography. I believe it to be an art form. And I believe Von Wong to be a talented artist -- regardless of my feelings about the social commentary. He's done a great job forging his own path in this medium. And I hope DPR keeps publishing his work. Every time they do I find something I like. Notwithstanding the naysayers here.

The science concerning man made Global warming is actually very robust. The basic characteristics of CO2 and other gases of absorbing heat have been well established. There is also now a robust record of CO2 measurements dating back millions of years. It shows that CO2 levels have been relatively stable around 270 ppm for most of that time,except for the last 200 years which show a rise to upwards of 400 ppm in 2016. Other climate forcings, such as subtle changes in the trajectories of the earth around the sun, albedo effect (reflectivity of different surface structures), cooling effect of aerosols etc. are also quite well understood or easy to calculate with accepted law of physics. Putting these together in climate models shows that the observed increase in temperature since the beginning of industrialisation can only be explained by the greenhouse effect.

The rise in CO2 can only be explained by human activity. Firstly, we can measure the amount of fuels we burn and calculate the amount of CO2 that releases. This matches the observed rise in CO2 levels very closely. Secondly, there are no natural phenomena that release CO2 anywhere close to the amounts we're releasing, nor have they changed suddenly in the last 200 years. E.g. volcanoes emit only a fraction of the CO2 that humans emit, and volcanoes have not become more active in the past 200 years.

Finally, observations in nature all show that the earth is warming and that CO2 levels are rising. Retreating glaciers, rising sea levels, loss of sea ice, loss of land ice on Greenland, increasing ocean acidity, changes in growth seasons, coral bleaching events due to warming oceans. They all point in the same direction.

The robustness of the theory, backed up by observation, and total lack of alternative theories that can explain the observed rise in temperatures is what leads to such a strong concensus among climate scientists.

The only reason this still isn't fully accepted by politicians is that climate change denial is funded by fossil fuel interests, most notably Koch Industries and ExxonMobil. Many of the skeptical scientists have been proven to produce reports for money, one even had price list! The Koch Brothers also help to get politicians (such as Lamar Smith) elected who abuse their power to attack legitimate scientists.

Now, before you blast off a few of the standard denialist responses, I urge you to read the excellent website Skeptical Science dot org. It has answers to all those climate myths already.

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2017 at 21:51 UTC
In reply to:

lemonadedrinker: Without coal, we'd be living in caves still. The lunacy of subsidizing forms of electricity that only work on sunny days or have to stop if the wind is too strong is insane.
Aside from that we have no sensible way of storing any power generated. We have seen from Chernobyl and Fukushima just how dangerous nuclear can be- radioactive half lives of thousands of years and serious problems with finding somewhere to store the waste.
Thorium seems to be a real alternative to all these so-called green schemes, and perhaps that's why nobody is really researching it for general use.
Last point...charging an electric car generates more CO2 than it saves in using an ordinary car.
I've always thought green energy was a con as the subsidies go to the rich and the poor are the ones who pay!!
Turn the lights out when you go..

The lowest quoted power purchase agreement for a solar project was US$ 0.0242 per kWh for a 1000 MW project in Abu Dhabi. So, that's the price they're selling the energy for in a real project.

In the North Sea there were recently some marine wind farm projects that are selling power for around $0.06 per kWh, which means they are competitive without subsidies.

Storage is definitely a major issue to be solved in order to roll out renewable energy. However, there are renewables that combined provide a more balanced grid (such as wind + solar + hydro). Other renewables can provide stable base loads, such as hydro or Ocean thermal energy.

And storage technology is definitely improving and becoming cheaper every year. There are already concentrated solar plants combined with molten salt storage that keep providing power at night. Many other grid scale storage technologies are in development.

So, your objections are based on old information. Technology is developing very rapidly now, leading to enormous cost reductions for energy generation and storage. And it doesn't have to be fixed overnight. It's a transition that will take another few decades. And in the meantime technology will continue to improve. And power will become cheaper for everyone.

Coal power is sold at around $0.05 to large industrial buyers. If coal power plants were forced to implement Carbon Capture and Storage, the price would rise to at least $0.12 per kWh. That means that coal is being subsidised by current sufferers of air pollution related diseases and future generations who will suffer the consequences of unmitigated climate change. The only beneficiaries of this subsidised use of coal are large corporations like Koch Industries. No wonder then, that the Koch Brothers are spending hundreds of millions on climate denial and buying political influence. It's the only reason why climate science is not widely accepted within the GOP, even though it was put on the agenda by the administration of Saint Reagan.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 19:40 UTC
In reply to:

lemonadedrinker: Without coal, we'd be living in caves still. The lunacy of subsidizing forms of electricity that only work on sunny days or have to stop if the wind is too strong is insane.
Aside from that we have no sensible way of storing any power generated. We have seen from Chernobyl and Fukushima just how dangerous nuclear can be- radioactive half lives of thousands of years and serious problems with finding somewhere to store the waste.
Thorium seems to be a real alternative to all these so-called green schemes, and perhaps that's why nobody is really researching it for general use.
Last point...charging an electric car generates more CO2 than it saves in using an ordinary car.
I've always thought green energy was a con as the subsidies go to the rich and the poor are the ones who pay!!
Turn the lights out when you go..

Wrong on several scores. Coal helped us to achieve industrialisation, but that's not a reason to keep using it if there are serious costs/damages as a result of continued use.

Solar and wind are already economically more attractive alternatives in many regions and continue to improve. The lowest price per kWh in utility scale solar power projects is already down to $0.025 which is cheaper than a fully depreciated power plant next to a coal field... And prices for solar continue to drop. If we start to factor in the hidden costs of coal (CO2 leading to climate change and local pollutants leading to health issues), coal is really a very expensive energy source.

Electric Vehicles are definitely cleaner than the cleanest petrol cars. In my own case (based on real measurements), I save 40-50% CO2 emissions on a 'well to wheel' basis compared to a clean diesel in the Netherlands. And we still use relatively much coal in our energy mix, so as we increase our use of renewable energy that difference will grow.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 00:37 UTC
In reply to:

Chuck2: I remember the 1950's and 1960's as a time of technicolor green sunsets, and glittery stuff floating in the air. Snow turned a dingy gray after a few hours and eventually became nearly black. Not sure I want us to go back to that.

This movie may well prove prophetic.

@WGvanDyck

It would be easier to give the new administration the benefit of the doubt if there weren't so many signs of bad intentions. Such as putting a hard core EPA hater in charge of that agency, or claiming to pull out of the UN climate accords.

I take my cues from e.g. the way in which Congress has bullied legitimate climate scientists (the work of Lamar Smith in particular). And now the new administration has stated its intention to defund Earth Sciences at Nasa. If they are so sure that climate change is not happening, then surely they should support more science to get the facts. But science on climate change is very robust now, so they are fighting it for monetary reasons: fossil fuel industries funding political campaigns.

Streamlining sounds like a logical idea, but I'm still skeptical about what this administration is up to.

To be honest, I don't care so much about all the other policy they want to enact. I live in the Netherlands, so if they build a wall, or ban all Muslims, or cut taxes for the richest, or take health insurance away from millions of people that is the sovereignty of the US people. But almost half my country is below sea level, so the (in)action of other countries does affect us. E.g. we have to spend billions in the next decade to upgrade our coastline and river defenses.

I'm glad we want the same things with regards to clean air and water, and hope with all my heart that I will be proven wrong.

Thank you for a civil exchange. So rare these days... Good night. I'm off to bed. Even in the Netherlands, that socialist paradise :-), we have to get up in the morning to go to work...

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 00:22 UTC
In reply to:

Lea5: Is that Trump in the first picture?

@WGvanDyck
I'm not saying that the USA is a terrible country, and don't know what the number of vacation days has to do with it.

You suggested that the pictures should have the Chinese president in them. I replied that the current Chinese leadership shows more responsibility than the new Trump administration when it comes to shifting away from a carbon based society. I don't trust them at all to not take away the regulatory safeguards against pollution.

But like I said: I don't really like this photographic series. It's overblown and overly dramatic, which takes away from the message. Showing pictures of the actual pollution like you recall from the 50's/60's will help convince more people of the positive work of the EPA etc.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 23:52 UTC
In reply to:

Chuck2: I remember the 1950's and 1960's as a time of technicolor green sunsets, and glittery stuff floating in the air. Snow turned a dingy gray after a few hours and eventually became nearly black. Not sure I want us to go back to that.

This movie may well prove prophetic.

@WGvanDyck
It's hard to trust the current administration before we see any proof of them taking environmental protection seriously. They even put an outspoken criric in charge of the EPA.

The agenda is to cut down regulations, and even to roll back on standards that were set by previous administrations (including previous Republican ones).

The GOP of the past 6 years (since the tea party took over) also has a proven track record of attacking environmental science, especially climate science. This is reinforced by a sustained campaign of climate denial with Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (same groups using the same tactics of the tobacco lobby denying the relationship between smoking and cancer).

So you see, it's very hard to not worry about what these people are about to do.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 21:39 UTC
In reply to:

Lea5: Is that Trump in the first picture?

Sorry, I hit the button too soon...

There has always been a place for politically themed photography. It is a legitimate way to express one's opinion, whether we agree or not.

Personally, I agree with this guy's message. However, I do not care very much for this photographic style. I think the real life images of smog filled days before pollution regulation was strengthened tell a far more telling tale. Those are the days this administration seemingly wants to return to with their attack on the EPA.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 20:43 UTC
In reply to:

Lea5: Is that Trump in the first picture?

China should have acted earlier, but so should have the West. Historically speaking, most of the human added CO2 comes from the West. And even though China is now the biggest polluter in absolute terms, the US pollute the most Per Capital by a long margin. And that's not even counting the pollution we shift to China by having our stuff produced there.

So yes, the current US administration is ducking its responsibility. And it is also true that the administration, and the GOP members of Congress, is largely filled with people from the political network of the Koch Brothers.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 20:35 UTC
In reply to:

Lea5: Is that Trump in the first picture?

To be fair, China is very much committed now to reducing both CO2 emissions (and other greenhouse gasses) and local pollutants that cause smog in major urban areas.

China has recently halted many new coal power projects and announced major additional investments in clean power. It is already the largest investor in renewables, electric cars. Still a long way to go, but definitely taking responsibility. That cannot be said of Trump and his cabinet of Koch Industries puppets.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 18:33 UTC

So far, there are no rumours of other major manufacturers doing anything disruptive.

Apple are still on the 1/3" sensor, which limits what they can achieve compared to 1/2.3" or 1/2.5" sensors (although Apple do seem to have excellent processing to get the most out of the sensor).

Maybe Sony will finally nail it with the new phones to be announced at MWC, but they usually lack OIS or suffer from a lack of corner sharpness or just unappealing processing.

Maybe the trend of dual cameras with different focal lengths is something that will continue. However, LG's implementation with an ultra wide secondary camera isn't as useful as Apple's longer focal length.
So, that could be where Samsung is lagging. OTOH they do offer the lens cover with excellent optical screw on lenses (Ultra wide angle and 2x tele) which offer pretty good image quality. They could offer it as a freeby like they do with the Gear VR set or fitness band.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 20:36 UTC as 33rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

villagranvicent: In which way this phone is better than my iPhone 7? I can get a leather case for it too if that's the big deal.

You can get an iPhone for free? You mean to tell me that even the proletarians on social security can get it? No... You don't want to be mistakenly identified as a bum, so better get that Vertu...

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2017 at 22:37 UTC
In reply to:

villagranvicent: In which way this phone is better than my iPhone 7? I can get a leather case for it too if that's the big deal.

Your iPhone can be bought by any idiot from the lower classes. Surely, one doesn't want to be associated with such riff-raff.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 21:24 UTC

The PureView solution is IMHO still the best way to achieve both great IQ and zoom in a smartphone. The large sensor (1/1.2" in the 808) and downsampling pretty much guarantee great IQ, while the high resolution allows for lossless zoom. All this was enabled by an extremely high standard optical lens. The camera module may not be tiny or flush with the body, but it's much more compact than a zoomlens.

Zoom lens based options have never allowed a really compact phone design and have limited lens apertures. The other option is the dual camera solution, which only has two 'zoom' positions. But these are usually with one sensor being inferior (LG G5) or two small sensors (iPhone 7 Plus). Samsung S7/S7 Edge now has a lens cover that comes with two lenses: a wide angle, and a 2x zoom. Pretty good quality, but with some hassle of lens changing.

Such a pity that the phones that had these PureView cameras were not very attractive on other features. The 1020 was severely hindered by its slow processor, which was a limitation of the Windows Phone platform at the time. Photo processing was way too slow. Also, the platforms themselves were an obstacle: Symbian on the 808 was already in decline, while Windows Phone on the 1020 never took off. For me, that was the reason to not buy them. Then, when I finally decided to give Windows 10 Mobile a chance, PureView on the 950XL was watered down to 1/2.5" and 20MP. Still, that camera is better than the S7 Edge in some comparisons I made.

I do hope that the technology will make it to the market again in an attractive high end Android flagship, now that the Nokia brand is back. Not sure where the PureView patents went in the deals between Nokia, Microsoft and HMD Global. Could be they're still with Microsoft who will let them rot...

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2017 at 09:52 UTC as 3rd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

dennis tennis: President Trump will put a wall around China. We can't trust China. Our only true friend is Russia. Don't ever use any electronics or apps from China, trust Russian, they have our backs.

@Newe
No, it's not 'America First'. From now on it will be 'Fossil Fuel Interests First'. Scrap any environmental regulation that gets in the way of of Big Oil and Coal, so that the Koch Brothers can keep making billions.

Just look at the cabinet positions being filled up by lobbyists from the Koch political network.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2017 at 10:50 UTC
On article Microsoft Lumia 950 camera review (122 comments in total)
In reply to:

scandiskwindows9x: still functional and avalaiuble in windows 10 mobile the lumia panorama, just have certain problems with stitching but still functional

Lumia Panorama is not available for native Windows 10 phones like the Lumia 950(XL).

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2016 at 22:12 UTC
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