Najinsky

Joined on Feb 21, 2006

Comments

Total: 581, showing: 121 – 140
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Very poor gallery.

First, it's an 18-150 lens, yet only two shots are over 50mm; one at 62/f11 and one at 150/f9.

The 150 f9 shot has nothing in sharp focus, is this a photographer choice or is the lens really that soft at 150 f/9? If it's really that soft there is no point having the lens go to 150 as an upsampled 100mm would look better. Well, that could be the case for this type of zoom, but in this case we have to guess because there is no 100mm shot, or 80mm, or 135mm, etc.

Also, to keep lenses compact and easier to design, software corrections are allowed for. This happens automatically during raw conversion for many cameras. For example, M43 images carry image correction data in the image file which is applied automatically by most major converters. How does it work with EOS-M, as some of these images would clearly benefit from some basic CA and diffraction compensation.

Guys, you know I love you, but I find this content quite sub-par on several levels.

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2017 at 15:58 UTC as 31st comment | 9 replies

Mhmm, with those totems, could make for an excellent retro gaming table. Robotron anyone? Air Hockey?

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 19:11 UTC as 10th comment | 2 replies

I think this will live or die based on the quality of the touch rejection. A smart configurable surface has the potential to be enjoyable and productive to use, but would be very frustrating if you have to spend half your time correcting for unintentional touches.

I was reminded of this today when installing security camera monitoring software on my friends galaxy edge S6 phone.

I couldn't even pick it up without triggering some pop-up. Coming from Apple devices, it was a very frustrating experience.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 16:56 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply

Looks like LHC meets spinal tap Stonehenge.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 11:58 UTC as 17th comment
On article 2016 DPReview Readers' Best Shots: People (93 comments in total)
In reply to:

timo: I wish people would back-off on the post-processing. All of these are intrinsically great shots, but some of them have been ruined on the computer.

Revenant: +1

Criticising photos is inherently a good thing. It causes you to think, analyse, assess and communicate.

However, many do seem to miss the mark on the point of criticism. PP is intrinsic to digital photography, whether you take control of it yourself, or leave it to the engineers who made your camera, every digital photo is post processed, bar none. Some seem to understand this, some don't.

Without access to the raw data, it's actually very hard to know how well a final image has been processed.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2017 at 10:18 UTC

Who knew DPR comments was THE place to get great advice on DIY tools.

Story and comments had me gripped, my gf had to wrench me away from the screen.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2016 at 10:48 UTC as 4th comment
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1638 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Obviously life is way too short to explore the minutiae of over 1000 comments, so this may be duplication. The thing that struck me most is the comment (conclusions) about being able to get much more camera for your money.

I've spent a lot of money on cameras; prime compacts, zoom compacts, full frame (DSLR/mirrorless), M43, APSC (DSLR/Mirrorless), bridge cameras. I also follow latest developments, so feel I have a pretty good handle on what is available to offer something new to the experience.

For me the criteria would go something like this; decent grip and central finder (dslr style). Compact size and weight, say under 500g. 20MP resolution or greater. Good dynamic range. Dual control dials from the shooting grip. Dual (or more) custom modes from a dial. Efficient focusing system (frame coverage and fast point selection). Interchangeable lenses. Budget $1000. Good customer support.

I could be wrong, but as far as I can see, only the Canon M5 fulfills this criteria?

Of course a good eye and skill are very important, but what makes you think the equipment isn't?

Part of that skill is understanding your equipment, its strengths and its limits.

It's pointless pointing to a showcase body of work and saying "see, here's how it's supposed to be done" because by definition the work being shown in the showcase is of when the results worked. Or are you saying you never made a mistake or bad choice or bad exposure in your life?

The problem with this 'a good photographer can do anything with anything nonsense ' is it's nonsense. You really think Ansel Adams could shoot high speed sports onto plate glass just because he was a skilled photographer? Part of the skill was knowing he couldn't.

And while a good photographer can maybe get something good with anything, in reality, the shoot with something, something they chose based on their requirements.

Gear is important, period. I'd guess it's what most of us are here for.

Th

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 05:57 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1638 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Obviously life is way too short to explore the minutiae of over 1000 comments, so this may be duplication. The thing that struck me most is the comment (conclusions) about being able to get much more camera for your money.

I've spent a lot of money on cameras; prime compacts, zoom compacts, full frame (DSLR/mirrorless), M43, APSC (DSLR/Mirrorless), bridge cameras. I also follow latest developments, so feel I have a pretty good handle on what is available to offer something new to the experience.

For me the criteria would go something like this; decent grip and central finder (dslr style). Compact size and weight, say under 500g. 20MP resolution or greater. Good dynamic range. Dual control dials from the shooting grip. Dual (or more) custom modes from a dial. Efficient focusing system (frame coverage and fast point selection). Interchangeable lenses. Budget $1000. Good customer support.

I could be wrong, but as far as I can see, only the Canon M5 fulfills this criteria?

Pavel, your photos are very beautiful and for sure well composed, your work is very nice to look at.

However, your comments seem very naive if you can not see the difference between your carefully composed and considered studio/architectural work and my travel shots.

Being a traveller is precisely why I have an interest in compact cameras that deliver great IQ, as many photos are opportunistic and depend on having the camera do what you want at a moments notice.

For example, this little Cambodian girl on the counter top: https://www.dpreview.com/galleries/4910244932/download/3519637

I was waiting for a motorcycle to take me to a temple at the top of a mountain. My driver came and I climbed aboard, as he started to drive off I passed this shop with a small pretty girl playing with soda cans on a counter top. Raise and click was all I had time for. Sufficient DR and resolution and a lot of PP flexibility is what got the shot, a shot that generates a lot of diverse interest.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 22:07 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1638 comments in total)
In reply to:

AKH: If the M5 shares the sensor in the 80D I fail to see that the M5 falls 1 stop behind the competition.

According to DxoMark the 80D does not fall that much behind. Only around 1/2 stop in dynamic range and 1/3 of a stop in high ISO performance compared to the A6300.

Pavel, the EF-M lens selection for EOS M cameras is really not that different than the EF-S lens selection for APS-C DSLR bodies. The difference, in Canon lenses, can be summarized as follows; 1) there have have been multiple iterations of similar (kit) zooms - this affects quantity but not choice, most people would choose to get the best kit zoom, for M it comes as standard with M and is very good, so no loss there. 2) M has the same number of primes as EF-S, they are simply different focal lengths. This is not a bad thing as M can use EF-S lenses so it increases the options. 3) M doesn't have a fast (2.8) standard zoom. This is genuine gap and an obvious one to fill if they are serious about mirrorless.

But that's it, that's the difference between EF-S and M. And obviously this is mitigated somewhat by the fact M can use not only EF-S lenses, but also the light and compact STM EF lenses like the 50/1.8 and 40/2.8 pancake.

In terms of IQ, 3 of the M lenses are very good indeed.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 21:46 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1638 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Obviously life is way too short to explore the minutiae of over 1000 comments, so this may be duplication. The thing that struck me most is the comment (conclusions) about being able to get much more camera for your money.

I've spent a lot of money on cameras; prime compacts, zoom compacts, full frame (DSLR/mirrorless), M43, APSC (DSLR/Mirrorless), bridge cameras. I also follow latest developments, so feel I have a pretty good handle on what is available to offer something new to the experience.

For me the criteria would go something like this; decent grip and central finder (dslr style). Compact size and weight, say under 500g. 20MP resolution or greater. Good dynamic range. Dual control dials from the shooting grip. Dual (or more) custom modes from a dial. Efficient focusing system (frame coverage and fast point selection). Interchangeable lenses. Budget $1000. Good customer support.

I could be wrong, but as far as I can see, only the Canon M5 fulfills this criteria?

Pavel, why do I need to supply a link? Just click my profile and check my gallerey. It includes both some of my favorite shots, and also shots that demonstrate some of the shortcomings I encounter.

Im not saying you can't make a good shot with a 12 (or even 4) mp camera. I'm simply saying sometimes I find myself needing to crop, sometimes severely.

As the saying goes, better to have and not need, than need and not have.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 21:14 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1638 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Obviously life is way too short to explore the minutiae of over 1000 comments, so this may be duplication. The thing that struck me most is the comment (conclusions) about being able to get much more camera for your money.

I've spent a lot of money on cameras; prime compacts, zoom compacts, full frame (DSLR/mirrorless), M43, APSC (DSLR/Mirrorless), bridge cameras. I also follow latest developments, so feel I have a pretty good handle on what is available to offer something new to the experience.

For me the criteria would go something like this; decent grip and central finder (dslr style). Compact size and weight, say under 500g. 20MP resolution or greater. Good dynamic range. Dual control dials from the shooting grip. Dual (or more) custom modes from a dial. Efficient focusing system (frame coverage and fast point selection). Interchangeable lenses. Budget $1000. Good customer support.

I could be wrong, but as far as I can see, only the Canon M5 fulfills this criteria?

PS: I don't have a horse in this race, I will buy any camera that delivers something useful and enjoyable for me that I don't get with my existing gear. This is why price is also a factor; this year has been dreadful in terms of manufacturers drastically upping their price for adding feature I don't want (for example, 4k video)

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 21:12 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1638 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Obviously life is way too short to explore the minutiae of over 1000 comments, so this may be duplication. The thing that struck me most is the comment (conclusions) about being able to get much more camera for your money.

I've spent a lot of money on cameras; prime compacts, zoom compacts, full frame (DSLR/mirrorless), M43, APSC (DSLR/Mirrorless), bridge cameras. I also follow latest developments, so feel I have a pretty good handle on what is available to offer something new to the experience.

For me the criteria would go something like this; decent grip and central finder (dslr style). Compact size and weight, say under 500g. 20MP resolution or greater. Good dynamic range. Dual control dials from the shooting grip. Dual (or more) custom modes from a dial. Efficient focusing system (frame coverage and fast point selection). Interchangeable lenses. Budget $1000. Good customer support.

I could be wrong, but as far as I can see, only the Canon M5 fulfills this criteria?

Kind of true, except I don't set criteria to be silly, I set it based on criteria I have found useful to me.

For example, if the camera is large and heavy (like my 5D and L glass) it doesn't always get taken out. Compact and lightweight, means it gets used more.

Lens changing can be a bind; be it not enough hands, delaying a group/family or simply not having taken a lens with me, so high MP count with good pixel quality is very useful for cropping (a kind of digital zoom). This is where my 16MP M43 system fall down, both in terms of resolution and pixel level quality (except for the very best lenses I use).

Put a tele lens on a camera for, say, wildlife, and framing the subject can become challenging. A centrally located finder and good grip help in this respect.

Under a jungle canopy, where lighting varies greatly, as does subject, and having dual controls from the shooting grip makes for a much more relaxed and successful experience.

It's not contrived, just keeping it real

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 21:04 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1638 comments in total)

Obviously life is way too short to explore the minutiae of over 1000 comments, so this may be duplication. The thing that struck me most is the comment (conclusions) about being able to get much more camera for your money.

I've spent a lot of money on cameras; prime compacts, zoom compacts, full frame (DSLR/mirrorless), M43, APSC (DSLR/Mirrorless), bridge cameras. I also follow latest developments, so feel I have a pretty good handle on what is available to offer something new to the experience.

For me the criteria would go something like this; decent grip and central finder (dslr style). Compact size and weight, say under 500g. 20MP resolution or greater. Good dynamic range. Dual control dials from the shooting grip. Dual (or more) custom modes from a dial. Efficient focusing system (frame coverage and fast point selection). Interchangeable lenses. Budget $1000. Good customer support.

I could be wrong, but as far as I can see, only the Canon M5 fulfills this criteria?

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 20:40 UTC as 149th comment | 11 replies
On article Sigma releases price and availability for sd Quattro H (370 comments in total)

Since this camera doesn't have video will it be considered already five years out of date and marked down accordingly if reviewed?

Sorry, that sounds a bit negative. What I'm really saying is, I love stills photography and really don't have much of an interest in video (yes I know about 8mp frame grabs and post focus) and based on a number polls dotted around various forums I now know I'm also in the vast majority, with poll results suggesting serious interest in video only around the 10% mark.

I understand that many feel photography and videography are converging due to overlapping technology, but fundamentally they are very different, with photography being primarily a solo pursuit (sometimes with assistance) and good video more of a team sport.

If DPR insists on making video a critical feature in reviews, could they please do so by providing separate metrics and conclusions for video and stills shooters?

This camera release seems like an ideal time to address this growing issue,

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 07:10 UTC as 41st comment | 2 replies

This is very nice. I like very much.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 14:04 UTC as 30th comment
In reply to:

Maoby: Nikon D500 !

It's my best digital camera to date

https://www.flickr.com/photos/maoby/albums/72157670373175525/page1

Well yeah, hard to argue with photos like that. But as good as the D500 may be, it's always the eye behind the lens who is making the shot and that's stands out even more than the fantastic IQ. Great body of work and a pleasure to look at.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 15:34 UTC

This is the toughest category, not a bad camera among them and most are exceptional in some way; it will come down to which exceptional features means the most for a given user.

Trying to be objective, the one that impressed me the most is the Pentax K-1. The sheer number of useful features built on the back of sensor based IBIS soundly trumps the competition; AA simulation, horizon correction, Astro tracking, superior pixel shift resolution implementation, all wrapped up in a fairly compact feature packed body.

Best of all, in a year that will be remembered as the year many ILC manufacturers added 40% to the cost of their flagship, the K-1 bucks the trend and puts value for money front and center.

I doubt it will have the popularity to win against the bigger names, so I'm just using the comment as a chance to say well done Ricoh/Pentax, Bravo.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 13:22 UTC as 48th comment
In reply to:

Najinsky: Maybe my memory is failing but didn't sealife used to rebrand Ricoh cameras for underwater use?

If there is a connection, would be ultra cool if this turns out to be an obscure clue that Ricoh are readying a 1" compact. Be still my beating heart...

Yes, that was it, Sea & Sea. Thanks. Ah well, I can still hope.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2016 at 14:59 UTC

Maybe my memory is failing but didn't sealife used to rebrand Ricoh cameras for underwater use?

If there is a connection, would be ultra cool if this turns out to be an obscure clue that Ricoh are readying a 1" compact. Be still my beating heart...

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2016 at 04:48 UTC as 6th comment | 3 replies
On article 2016 Roundup: Best Camera Drones Under $1500 (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Thanks for the very useful roundup. I've been toying with the idea as they are often on promotion here in Thailand but I never got around to building a feature comparison to know if the promotions are a good deal or just clearance of older generations with older features.

One negative comment for the roundup is the lack of consistency in highlighting important specs, for example, unless I still missed it after reading it twice, I don't see any specs for the range of the DJI Phantom 4 models.

Thanks

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 17:47 UTC
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