Najinsky

Joined on Feb 21, 2006

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On article Hasselblad X1D-50c First Impressions Review (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

sts2: Wow, everyone was hating on this camera earlier, and but give them a test chart and everybody falls in love with it ;-)
/puts on flame suit

I for one wasn't hating on it earlier, there is lots I love about it, including what the test chart is showing, and the metadata approach to high ISO shooting.

But this preview has actually curtailed any thoughts I was harbouring about jumping on board with it.

I love the design and how they made it so compact. It's a camera I thought I really could take with me without too much hassle, except...

10 seconds to boot up, it eats through the battery and is awkward to change the AF point. That's just not going to work for a walk around camera that will frequently be turned on and off as opportunities arise.

I also think 50MP is a bit on the low side for a camera of this cost, given the Full Frame bodies available now.

I don't need high MP for every shot, but I prefer to crop rather than change lens, so more MP turns my primes into zooms: 28, 35, and 50mm from one lens. A crop is a crop

I'll wait for MK 2; 80MP, 2s startup, touch AF point selection and in-camera charging?

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2017 at 16:43 UTC
On article Hasselblad X1D-50c First Impressions Review (316 comments in total)

I find that the colours in the X1D rendering of this scene are exceptionally nice. I like very very much.

The skin tones of the 4 portraits, the cotton reels, the reds in the playing cards, the green of the foliage, the Yellow-Green label on the colour wheel, the Beatles patch, the paint tubes; just about everywhere I look in the scene I see great colour.

I understand this is mostly down to the profile in ACR, so it seems Adobe have done a really nice job of matching the intent.

But I'm wondering if Hassleblad tweaked with the CFA give to the sensor what they consider to be an optimal spectral response to start from. It will be interesting to see the colour analysis from DxO if they get to test it.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2017 at 15:45 UTC as 25th comment | 4 replies
On article We try out the new HassleVlad (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

darngooddesign: Another thing this camera has shown us is that DPR has a some real cranks as commenters.

There are almost 100 comments. Would you care to join a grown up discussion that includes what interests YOU or are you simply more comfortable assuming you sit in with the in crowd?

At least the cranks you refer to are willing to express an opinion, whereas you seem happy to hope others will speak on your behalf.

Given you took the time to make a comment, why waste it trying to fit in with your perceived opinion of what others think? Either you have an opinion or you don't. If you try to moderate your opinion so that it is in line with what others think, it can only ever look exactly the same as not having an opinion.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2017 at 22:35 UTC
On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (346 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul Hodgson: Good news for him I just hope his communication style, as per his blog, doesn't hit Hassy. On a very personal level I want communications to have depth but brevity, Thien's blog always felt like reading a thesis and listening to someone who liked the sound of their own voice. I stopped following.

@crsantin.

Your post come across as too harsh.

Any and every blogger is under pressure to write articles that generate traffic, and this sometime leads them to write glib and pretentious statements.

None is more guilty of this than Ken Rockwell. He has a review of the excellent Canon EF-M 22mm prime lens where he spends close to 200 words pontificating that great sharpness is not that important in great image making, and then he opens his sumary of the review by saying how the 22mm is a great sharp lens!!

These are the dichotomies that any publisher has to deal with. Try to say something interesting or watch your click-through rate decline to the point you are removed from the grid.

Whenever you experience a negative response to something you see published, it's a great opportunity to explore whether that negative perception actually comes from the published article, or something within yourself.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2017 at 19:36 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Seeing the similar in the dissimilar is an often ignored essential life skill. It's an enabler for adaptation, faster learning and better understanding.

Seeking feedback for your images is useful but of greater benefit is in giving feedback. It is much easier to be critical of someone else's work than of your own. But Identifying the shortcomings in the work of others will enable you to do the same for your own.

Use a 3:1 system. If your reaction to an image is positive, identify 3 good and 1 bad features, the opposite for a bad reaction.

Your pole image:

B1: Focus blur leads from left to right with no pause for interest.
B2: Left background adds nothing.
B3: Interesting elements not well positioned.

G1: Blue and rust are complementary and work nicely together.

Fix: Add blur to right and crop for better composition.

Result:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/d2s4lb8fqazv5fj/Dprfix.jpeg?dl=1

Better? Hard to tell at low res crop, but maybe with better resolution (less digital).

That would be cool. But I'm in a remote part of Thailand. During the day the light is very strong. The best time for light is from about 2 hours before sunset until Sunset (or early morning, so people tell me). Unfortunately this is also the time the hundreds of wild dogs awaken and begin defending their territory. I carry my camera mounted on a heavy duty manfrotto monopod, so it can double as a hammer when needed.

But if the distance and environment doesn't put you off, just let me know when you're arriving and I'll pick you up ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2017 at 18:06 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Isn't a downside of this approach that it's essentially adding an extra 1mm of glass to the sensor stack, which seems can degrade the MTF performance?

As far as I know, Newton rings are simply an interference pattern usually atttibuted to reflections (although personally I don't fully subscribe to that view) I feel polishing would normally lead to more reflection, not less, but either way that's not the phenomenon I'm referring to.

I'm referring to this article by Roger Cicala at Lens Rentals:

https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2014/06/the-glass-in-the-path-sensor-stacks-and-adapted-lenses/

The implication is that lenses are designed/built in accordance to the sensor/filter stack the light will encounter between the exit pupil of the lens and actually hitting the true 'sensor'

Adding additional glass to the path appears to impact that, although not necessarily always in a negative way.

ps: Even it does, it's still a cool product that offers genuine benefits that can outweigh this potential downside.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2017 at 17:24 UTC

Seeing the similar in the dissimilar is an often ignored essential life skill. It's an enabler for adaptation, faster learning and better understanding.

Seeking feedback for your images is useful but of greater benefit is in giving feedback. It is much easier to be critical of someone else's work than of your own. But Identifying the shortcomings in the work of others will enable you to do the same for your own.

Use a 3:1 system. If your reaction to an image is positive, identify 3 good and 1 bad features, the opposite for a bad reaction.

Your pole image:

B1: Focus blur leads from left to right with no pause for interest.
B2: Left background adds nothing.
B3: Interesting elements not well positioned.

G1: Blue and rust are complementary and work nicely together.

Fix: Add blur to right and crop for better composition.

Result:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/d2s4lb8fqazv5fj/Dprfix.jpeg?dl=1

Better? Hard to tell at low res crop, but maybe with better resolution (less digital).

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2017 at 07:00 UTC as 3rd comment | 2 replies
On article We try out the new HassleVlad (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Welcome Vlad.

That's the pleasantries out out the way, now down to business ;-)

First job, please please fix the text editor for writing forum post with iPad.

I'd give you a full list of all the bugs, but this comment section is limited to 999 characters.

Second, it would be nice for those mobile users for which flash is no longer support to have access to the older lens reviews where the lens is still current. Main test results page requires flash.

Example: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-45-2p8-o20/3

Thanks, and welcome again!

And /that's/ how you write a punchline. Literally made me lol.

PS: Could you ask Vlad to change the comment input box so I can write in italics too. Thanks ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2017 at 19:26 UTC
On article We try out the new HassleVlad (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Wait, you guys think this is the April fool joke?

I don't see it.

1. They desperately need a developer.
2. They were advertising that they were hiring a developer.
3. His face has that 'barely touched by sunlight' developer appearance.
4. The EXIFs show the images were taken by the X1D.

The closest I can see to this being an April fool joke would be an implication that someone called Vlad might have a problem finding a job in post-Trump America.

But if that was the case I'm sure there'd be an outcry as the satire got mistaken for unPCness or racism in these tension filled times of ours.

Post Trump Election Victory, I guess. It's not Trumps America, he's just its current fairy godmother.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2017 at 10:38 UTC
In reply to:

samfan: (Assuming this is an April joke.)

Why doesn't something like this actually exist? I guess it wouldn't be possible for DSLR since the area in the mirror box is quite crowded and sensitive, but for MILC, maybe? At least for systems that don't have too large flange distance.

Sigma had a user-removable IR filter in their DLSRs, I think up to SD15, not sure about SD1. A pretty cool idea, again a shame other manufacturers didn't do the same at least for some special-edition products.

Even if it is (was) a fool, it's not DPR playing it, DPR is reporting a story from another company.

STC would be the one playing the fool, and DPR would be the 'fool' for reporting it.

A DPR fool would consist of DPR being the creator of the fool.

I'm pretty sure their photoshopped picture of a photographer trying to use a fridge to shoot wild bison was their attempt at that.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2017 at 06:26 UTC
On article We try out the new HassleVlad (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

maxnimo: On a more serious note, Nikon and Canon just announced they are closing their camera business permanently. Competition from smartphones killed their profits. So sad.

How is old Len? Tell him Phil Maway says hi.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2017 at 00:27 UTC

Isn't a downside of this approach that it's essentially adding an extra 1mm of glass to the sensor stack, which seems can degrade the MTF performance?

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2017 at 19:47 UTC as 5th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

samfan: (Assuming this is an April joke.)

Why doesn't something like this actually exist? I guess it wouldn't be possible for DSLR since the area in the mirror box is quite crowded and sensitive, but for MILC, maybe? At least for systems that don't have too large flange distance.

Sigma had a user-removable IR filter in their DLSRs, I think up to SD15, not sure about SD1. A pretty cool idea, again a shame other manufacturers didn't do the same at least for some special-edition products.

http://stcoptics.com/en/clip_filter/

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2017 at 19:40 UTC
On article We try out the new HassleVlad (100 comments in total)

Wait, you guys think this is the April fool joke?

I don't see it.

1. They desperately need a developer.
2. They were advertising that they were hiring a developer.
3. His face has that 'barely touched by sunlight' developer appearance.
4. The EXIFs show the images were taken by the X1D.

The closest I can see to this being an April fool joke would be an implication that someone called Vlad might have a problem finding a job in post-Trump America.

But if that was the case I'm sure there'd be an outcry as the satire got mistaken for unPCness or racism in these tension filled times of ours.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2017 at 17:38 UTC as 29th comment | 5 replies

No this is not it. This is a real product. Great idea too. Shame the only mirrorless supported is Sony A7. A slight yellow version of this would be perfect for countering purple flare when using Panasonic lenses on Olympus bodies.

A second cool feature is it could be adorned with those tiny cardboard cutouts from the other story so the silhouette is integrated directly into the scene (but remember to invert the location.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2017 at 17:13 UTC as 9th comment
On article We try out the new HassleVlad (100 comments in total)

Welcome Vlad.

That's the pleasantries out out the way, now down to business ;-)

First job, please please fix the text editor for writing forum post with iPad.

I'd give you a full list of all the bugs, but this comment section is limited to 999 characters.

Second, it would be nice for those mobile users for which flash is no longer support to have access to the older lens reviews where the lens is still current. Main test results page requires flash.

Example: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-45-2p8-o20/3

Thanks, and welcome again!

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2017 at 16:45 UTC as 30th comment | 2 replies
On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (346 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Interesting. In the article you link to about getting mirrorless right, he ended with:

"If any of the camera makers wants to make a really serious go of it ... then I’m more than happy to be involved in the design process from an early point where things can still be changed.... Hell, at this point, I’m frustrated enough that I’d even work for free."

I hope you remembered to negotiate a salary Ming ;-)

But also, can we therefore read into this that Hasselblad are starting work on a new mirrorless design? Maybe another crack at using Sony's E-Mount, but done right this time?

On his blog, regarding the announcement he says:

"...But sufficient to say that we will have something very, very interesting coming later this year."

From: https://blog.mingthein.com/2017/03/29/some-big-changes/#more-14251

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 18:08 UTC
On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (346 comments in total)
In reply to:

PAntunes: I don't get it.
Why not someone that works with their cameras 5 days a week? Why not get someone that instead of doing multiple things, does one really well?

It feels more like a publicity stunt that won't end well. Most hasselblad potencial users couldn't care less about what Ming has to say.

What makes you think it's for the benefit of current offerings? Their latest offering is already designed and built, too late for strategic input on that.

They already went after the E-Mount market once, and that didn't work out too well, perhaps because they didn't take input from someone who understands that market.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 15:56 UTC
On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (346 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul Hodgson: Good news for him I just hope his communication style, as per his blog, doesn't hit Hassy. On a very personal level I want communications to have depth but brevity, Thien's blog always felt like reading a thesis and listening to someone who liked the sound of their own voice. I stopped following.

Horses for courses.

You write with brevity when you communicate with people you know will listen.

When you know people are needing to be convinced, and you know some of their objections, you need to address the point in more detail and from more angles. You always want to be brief but it's a lot easier to get carried away.

Ideally once all points are addressed it should be re-edited for brevity, but sometimes people are in a hurry to publish.

Before the web, we accessed bulletin boards with dial up modems, and bandwidth was very precious. We had an expression for when someone got carried away with an excessive post.

"Sorry for the long post, I didn't have time to write a shorter one".

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 10:18 UTC
On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (346 comments in total)

Interesting. In the article you link to about getting mirrorless right, he ended with:

"If any of the camera makers wants to make a really serious go of it ... then I’m more than happy to be involved in the design process from an early point where things can still be changed.... Hell, at this point, I’m frustrated enough that I’d even work for free."

I hope you remembered to negotiate a salary Ming ;-)

But also, can we therefore read into this that Hasselblad are starting work on a new mirrorless design? Maybe another crack at using Sony's E-Mount, but done right this time?

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 09:56 UTC as 49th comment | 2 replies
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