Najinsky

Joined on Feb 21, 2006

Comments

Total: 662, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Najinsky: Could you explain where the number of Facebook likes you quote comes from?

This article shows 10k likes, but when I went to your Facebook page, the article discussing this had about 450 likes.

Thanks for the reply. And wow, over 10,000 people liked this article. Would be nice to have some insights into what specifically they liked.

I guess they'll be some who liked that you're doing these technical investigation type articles, but it also seems logical to assume that a lot of those likes are because you are beating up on Canon! And I find that quite depressing!

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2017 at 07:43 UTC

Could you explain where the number of Facebook likes you quote comes from?

This article shows 10k likes, but when I went to your Facebook page, the article discussing this had about 450 likes.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2017 at 19:40 UTC as 14th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

EthanP99: The one i saw posted was

SONY - You - Canon

Hilarious

Cyclic. I had the Canon, now have the Sony, now looking at Canon again!

It's the chase.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2017 at 07:24 UTC
In reply to:

theongu: This article is incorrect about bit-depth math.

The count of all the possible values is the denominator. Any value represented by those bits are the numerators. In an 8-bit number, there are 256 possible combinations. The possible values are 0/256, 1/256, .... 255/256.

It is true that 1/2 of the range of values represent the brightest stop; and the next 1/4 of represents the next brightest; and so on. It is NOT true that additional bits only enhance the shadows. Additional bits in the file refine the gradation throughout the range (within the sensor's limits).

For example:
An 8-bit value 00000011 and a 9-bit value 000000110 represent the same intensity in their respective number space (3/256 = 6/512). Now a 9-bit value 000000111 is a little brighter (7/512). This is in the range of "shadows".

This is also true for "highlights". An 8-bit value 11000011 is the same as this 9-bit value 110000110 (195/256 = 390/512). A 9-bit value of 110000111 is a little brighter (391/512).

@mosswings : You just seemed to introduce an arbitrary 12bit limit into the sensor. Where did that limit come from?

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2017 at 05:47 UTC
In reply to:

SandySandy: It is High Time that 24-27MP sensor are introduced for the M4/3 System. And they should be Stacked Backside Illuminated Sensors with DRAM so that their readout speed is also fast. Also there should be Clean ISO Atleast upto ISO 6400. M4/3 sensors need to improve substantially.

And M4/3 needs a complete scrapping on non-PDAF sensors. All M4/3 sensors Henceforth should ONLY be PDAF sensor.

Oh, ok. So you're telling people the sensors are improving, and you're not interested in sensor measurements that show whether they are or not. Got it.

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2017 at 23:47 UTC
In reply to:

T3: These are great looking cameras. I have a female friend who's never owned an ILC in her life, and she bought an E-M10 MKII a few months ago. The size, styling, and performance are perfect for her. It fits in her purse! She loves it. When I asked why she didn't get a DSLR-- even a "small" DSLR like a Canon Rebel-- she said, "Too big, too ugly." Yep, we have to remember that a lot of people now think that even smaller DSLRs are "big" cameras. We're living in the age where most people would much rather have a stylish 13" MacBook Air than 15" ugly-ass Dell business laptop. DSLRs are kind of the 15" Dell business laptops of the camera world now. Great for people who want the "business" look, but not so attractive for the younger generation of users growing up with Apple laptops and smartphones.

Admit it T3, you just wanted to make another post with Apple in it, and make it known you have female friends.

Speaking of which, I have some female friends, but very few have dedicated cameras any more as they nearly all use Apple iPhones.

But I've been dropping some of them due to my new rating system. They need to score 10 or higher on the AMBS scale. That's average minutes between selfies.

The new selfie mode on some cameras is one of those things where the more you think about it the weirder it seems. What's the marketing message behind that feature: I'm going to buy a new camera, so I can take photos of me!

But when you think about it, appealing to female vanity hasn't been the worst marketing strategy in history.

So which camera company will be the first to push the message hard: You're so beautiful, don't you deserve a special kind of camera?

Followed by the camera store sales talk, as the lady chooses between 3 wide angle primes asking, does my ass look big in this?

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2017 at 22:57 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: "Let me be clear about this, for Olympus and its customers Image Quality is not a feature, it's an expectation " - marketing man @ EM1.2 launch 2016.

Yet another m43 camera with an ancient 16mp sensor.

Marketing man speak with forked toungue, shock horror!

When APS-C entry level cameras have 24MP and AF systems a little more sophisticated than spray and pray, one is left wondering, who? why?

But wait, there's more to image quality than megapixels, and 6MP is enough for anyone to make an A4 print, yawn....

@brycesteiner: What 99.9% of users don't need is other people telling them what they do or don't need.

But this is DPR, so that ain't gonna happen, lol. ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2017 at 18:28 UTC
In reply to:

SandySandy: It is High Time that 24-27MP sensor are introduced for the M4/3 System. And they should be Stacked Backside Illuminated Sensors with DRAM so that their readout speed is also fast. Also there should be Clean ISO Atleast upto ISO 6400. M4/3 sensors need to improve substantially.

And M4/3 needs a complete scrapping on non-PDAF sensors. All M4/3 sensors Henceforth should ONLY be PDAF sensor.

@daftpunk

Head on over to bill claff's site photonstophotos.net

Everytime the 16mp sensor is rehashed the marketeers tell us what a wonderful job they did with their processor to squeeze more from the sensor. And every time it actually gets measured, surprise surprise, it's the same!

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2017 at 17:12 UTC

"Let me be clear about this, for Olympus and its customers Image Quality is not a feature, it's an expectation " - marketing man @ EM1.2 launch 2016.

Yet another m43 camera with an ancient 16mp sensor.

Marketing man speak with forked toungue, shock horror!

When APS-C entry level cameras have 24MP and AF systems a little more sophisticated than spray and pray, one is left wondering, who? why?

But wait, there's more to image quality than megapixels, and 6MP is enough for anyone to make an A4 print, yawn....

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2017 at 16:58 UTC as 13th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

GarysInSoCal: Whatta HUGE freakin waste of time AND money. Why charge 1000s of dollars for 3 lenses that offer an option that can easily be corrected in post in a matter of a few minutes. Yeah just keep wastin millions of dollars on redundant R&D Canon... that's what we've grown to expect from you. You should be worryin ALOT MORE about an answer to the D850 instead of fiddle F'ing around with 3 silly lenses that nobody's gonna buy.

I'm pretty sure Gary knows tilt can't be done in post (well, the blurring can but not the plane of focus). He seems to be being excessively ridiculous for attention, and getting it.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2017 at 20:20 UTC
In reply to:

GarysInSoCal: Whatta HUGE freakin waste of time AND money. Why charge 1000s of dollars for 3 lenses that offer an option that can easily be corrected in post in a matter of a few minutes. Yeah just keep wastin millions of dollars on redundant R&D Canon... that's what we've grown to expect from you. You should be worryin ALOT MORE about an answer to the D850 instead of fiddle F'ing around with 3 silly lenses that nobody's gonna buy.

You're a very clever puppy garyinsocal. I bit, and you got a click. Well done.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2017 at 15:12 UTC

Hard to imagine how the image quality is improved, the TS-E 90/2.8 was a favourite when I was a Canon shooter and the IQ always impressed.

It gave a noticeably different colour signature than my other lenses, not better or worse just a different balance to work with in raw.

I only used it with a 21mp camera so I guess these newer higher resolution cameras may have shown up its limits, so if this L version is even better I expect a lot of folks to be extremely happy with it.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 17:09 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon AF-P 70-300mm F4.5-5.6E ED VR sample gallery (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

J A C S: Mediocre. In #14 and #21, for example, there is nothing (stationary) acceptably sharp.

I think you may be being a touch harsh. I've seen much worse!

There are indeed technical issues with many of the images, some relating to camera settings, but mostly processing techniques.

But I think I see enough clues to suggest this may well be a pretty nice midrange (price) lens.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 13:04 UTC

Sorry.

I keep looking at it to see if perhaps my mood is influencing my response, but it's same every time. Visually unattractive, contrived, pretensious, me too.

As a personal project to explore technique and practice skills, it's probably a great technical result, and probably a success, but as something to share, it generates only disinterest for me.

Don't want to sound too harsh, but when something is published in this manner, I feel an honest critique is deserved all round.

Sorry.

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2017 at 08:51 UTC as 15th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Esign: At these heights, does the rule still applies to always vomit to leeward?

No, if the basket balanced with passengers you want to maintain balance to avoid having a basket full of panicked passengers, so just vomit where you feel it will do least damage, preferably over the side.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2017 at 09:13 UTC
On article Photo Essay: 16 years of war in Afghanistan (46 comments in total)

Well, at least the presidents seemed to be having a good time.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2017 at 18:14 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

Inukim: "The owner has sent the lens and and camera to a Leica service center..." AND AND?

... the Leica employee who originally hand assembled it is receiving grief counseling.

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2017 at 20:08 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Adobe Lightroom 1.0 (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Before Adobe Lightroom, there was Apple Aperture.

When Apple released Aperture they still had a good relationship with adobe and went to lengths to explain that it was not a competitor to Photoshop, as it focused on organization and workflow aspects, with only basic image tweaking/editing.

Still, it caused quite a furor because it turned out there was a background project called Shadowlands evolving within Adobe's mysterious ecosystem.

As Aperture grew in popularity, and the benefits of a raw organizational/workflow system became desirable, Adobe grasped the reigns of Shadowlands and accelerated development as the Lightroom product.

Their strategy to give Lightroom away as a free beta as quickly as possible worked. It stunted growth in Aperture adoption and Photography has suffered ever since.

Despite being built on a house of cards (a technology called lua), Lightroom's cross platform nature meant it claimed the lions share of the market and became the defacto standard.

C1 has always been a great raw processor, one of the best. But it is not in the same league as Aperture as a raw organizational/workflow tool.

Even in recent years where C1 has been worked on this area, they are facing huge issues of customers mistrust in metadata based organization, and this mistrust comes directly from Adobes attempt to rush Lightroom to market.

Early versions of Lightroom were beta, and if its catalog got corrupted it would simply delete it and start again, leading many photographers to think their photos had been deleted, and because they believed it, the net effect was they essentially were.

This consumer mistrust of metadata systems is now a shackle constraining any developer trying to bring highly efficient Aperture style organization to users. That's what Adobe did with Lightroom when they rushed it to market in their ultimately successful attempt to kill Aperture.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 15:00 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Adobe Lightroom 1.0 (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Before Adobe Lightroom, there was Apple Aperture.

When Apple released Aperture they still had a good relationship with adobe and went to lengths to explain that it was not a competitor to Photoshop, as it focused on organization and workflow aspects, with only basic image tweaking/editing.

Still, it caused quite a furor because it turned out there was a background project called Shadowlands evolving within Adobe's mysterious ecosystem.

As Aperture grew in popularity, and the benefits of a raw organizational/workflow system became desirable, Adobe grasped the reigns of Shadowlands and accelerated development as the Lightroom product.

Their strategy to give Lightroom away as a free beta as quickly as possible worked. It stunted growth in Aperture adoption and Photography has suffered ever since.

Despite being built on a house of cards (a technology called lua), Lightroom's cross platform nature meant it claimed the lions share of the market and became the defacto standard.

The light at the end of the tunnel, is that Adobe are porting Lightroom to mobile and doing a great job of it.

Lightroom mobile is probably the best mobile raw workflow solution available. It still suffers from the insane design decisions of its developers (or maybe those of its forebears) but in the absence of anything better it gets the crown.

I'm still not buying the full app though, not until Adobe acknowledges that subscription models are for pros only, and before you become a pro, you have to start as a non-pro, where subscription models don't make sense.

Pro features should relate to metadata and publishing, because pros need to work with that stuff. The ability to process a raw is not a pro feature, it's a feature every raw shooter wants, even if they are not making money yet.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 14:24 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Adobe Lightroom 1.0 (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Before Adobe Lightroom, there was Apple Aperture.

When Apple released Aperture they still had a good relationship with adobe and went to lengths to explain that it was not a competitor to Photoshop, as it focused on organization and workflow aspects, with only basic image tweaking/editing.

Still, it caused quite a furor because it turned out there was a background project called Shadowlands evolving within Adobe's mysterious ecosystem.

As Aperture grew in popularity, and the benefits of a raw organizational/workflow system became desirable, Adobe grasped the reigns of Shadowlands and accelerated development as the Lightroom product.

Their strategy to give Lightroom away as a free beta as quickly as possible worked. It stunted growth in Aperture adoption and Photography has suffered ever since.

Despite being built on a house of cards (a technology called lua), Lightroom's cross platform nature meant it claimed the lions share of the market and became the defacto standard.

A few years ago due to Lightroom's success, Apple discontinued Aperture. Despite this, Aperture remains stable and continues to work.

Because support for raw files comes from the operating system, it remains able to process raws from newer cameras.

I had anticipated replacing it by now, but while it continues to work I continue to use it because its raw processing is excellent and its organizational features still unsurpassed by any other software.

Internally it uses a 32bit floating point per channel (RGBA), in a wide gamut color space similar to ProPhoto RGB, something it has done since 2005, and something still being touted as a new benefit by todays photo apps.

It's one of the few organizational raw developer apps that allow tweaking of the demosaicing for noise, sharpness, detail and false color, while being decoded into the editing space.

It's something of a mini scandal that photographers were encouraged to an inferior product like Lightroom, but that's how the world works.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 14:11 UTC
Total: 662, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »