Najinsky

Joined on Feb 21, 2006

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On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II (663 comments in total)
In reply to:

sneakyracer: 4/3 sensor is dated imho. They date back to when larger sensors were really expensive. Enthusiasts demand better performance nowadays at the $1000+ pricepoint. All TV/Monitors today are 16:9 as well so the 4/3 format is a bit awkward except for more traditional applications like print (magazines). In very small form factors the 4/3" format is nice but on larger cameras it makes little sense except maybe for the smaller lenses and increased affordability (if any). That does not mean that the OM-D cameras are bad cameras. On the contrary they are excellent just that there are better options for most folks available today.

Pentax K1 has a moveable sensor (as part of the stabilisation system), this can correct small tilts when the camera is not held level, so the horizon is straight.

Note, this is not post capture correction that requires cropping, it is a rotation of the sensor before capture, so the horizon is level at the time of capture. It can compensate for a tilt of up to 2 degrees (I read).

The same shift system is used for the Astro tracer feature, that slightly rotates the sensor to compensate for the rotation of the earth during long exposures for Astro photography.

Perhaps one day this feature could be extended to support 90 degree rotation so a portrait image could be taken without rotating the camear, although it would then look smaller in the finder!

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 16:15 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II (663 comments in total)
In reply to:

sneakyracer: 4/3 sensor is dated imho. They date back to when larger sensors were really expensive. Enthusiasts demand better performance nowadays at the $1000+ pricepoint. All TV/Monitors today are 16:9 as well so the 4/3 format is a bit awkward except for more traditional applications like print (magazines). In very small form factors the 4/3" format is nice but on larger cameras it makes little sense except maybe for the smaller lenses and increased affordability (if any). That does not mean that the OM-D cameras are bad cameras. On the contrary they are excellent just that there are better options for most folks available today.

Round sensor? I think it is likely to happen. In the past the sensor was such an expensive component it was very important to use it all. But a square sensor with redundant areas in the corners (making it like a round sensor) would not be such a sin now, so it may only be a matter of time.

In terms of how likely, it's hard to quantify, but is much more likely than making square or rectangular lenses!!

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 13:08 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II (663 comments in total)
In reply to:

sneakyracer: 4/3 sensor is dated imho. They date back to when larger sensors were really expensive. Enthusiasts demand better performance nowadays at the $1000+ pricepoint. All TV/Monitors today are 16:9 as well so the 4/3 format is a bit awkward except for more traditional applications like print (magazines). In very small form factors the 4/3" format is nice but on larger cameras it makes little sense except maybe for the smaller lenses and increased affordability (if any). That does not mean that the OM-D cameras are bad cameras. On the contrary they are excellent just that there are better options for most folks available today.

BobT3218,

"Anyway, why limit your view of the wold by looking through a letter box?"

Open your eyes and look around and you will see your view of the world is already in letterbox format. This is because you have (hopefully) two eyes, set apart and aligned on the horizontal.

Cover one eye and after a moment of adjustment you'll be able to see square format.

This link is an interesting read: http://filmmakeriq.com/lessons/the-changing-shape-of-cinema-the-history-of-aspect-ratio/

Which also contains this video: https://youtu.be/lII5rXbxcCs

I shoot with both 16MP 4:3 and 24MP 3:2. When I want to crop to 16:9, when I use 4:3 I end up with only 12MP whereas with 3:2 I end up with 20MP. Quite a difference, but both have their uses.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 07:09 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II (663 comments in total)

"The low, mixed lighting of a Photokina meeting room was not ideal to really assess the quality of the finder in normal use, but it certainly seems sharp and clear. "

Aren't most viewfinders (in current bodies) pretty good in good light? Surely a complex mixed lighting scenario provides a pretty good test of the extra capabilities for a 'Pro' level finder?

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 05:45 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

brycesteiner: >>The company says dynamic range is improved, with noise performance improved by 1EV (though we're somewhat sceptical about this).<<

Why? They know it would be tested. Perhaps it's relating to the new ISO 64 LOW setting?

The E-M1 has the lowest DR of current M43 offerings. At base ISO, the E-M5 about 0.36 stop better, while the 20MP GX8 is 0.82 stop better. Above base iso the gaps reduce.

This is based on William Claff's measurements, and DXO gives similar figures:

http://photonstophotos.net/Charts/PDR.htm#Ideal%204/3,Olympus%20OM-D%20E-M1,Olympus%20OM-D%20E-M5%20Mark%20II,Panasonic%20DMC-GX8

So the E-M1 mark 2 only has to perform to GX8 levels and is already 82% of the way there on it's 1 stop claim. They make note of using anti-reflective coatings on both sides of the sensors glass seal. Sony made a similar note when introducing the A7R2, but it was just one of a number of new sensor design features, others included BSI and Gapless microlens design, so it's hard to assign a value to the coatings in isolation.

From this, I'd guess the improvement could be in the region of 0.8 to 0.9 stops. More would be even better.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 05:02 UTC
In reply to:

ttran88: Barney probably knew before hand what was going to be released at photokina this year. After today with the new camera announcements the M5 does feel outdated and disappointing.

Did you see any prices for the new stuff yet?

Canon an Sony are becoming the cheap alternatives!

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 01:37 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 First Impressions Review (128 comments in total)

Throwback Tuesday.

Richard, take a look at Simon's review of the old Ricoh GX100 back in 2007, the first 'large' sensor compact to offer 24-72mm.

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/ricohgx100/14

While today's lenses and sensors have advanced light years ahead, ergonomics and control seem to be taking continuous steps backwards.

How cool would it be to write a review like that but adding the benefits of modern sensors, lenses and processors.

I'd love to see what Ricoh could do with a 1" compact.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 01:28 UTC as 25th comment
In reply to:

Barbu: Is it only my impression, or does anyone else feels like the DPR editors are trying hard (and succeeding) to incite "discussions" by trolling on popular products?
Intentionally planting seeds of flamewars in exchange for comments and pageviews. Libertine laissez-faire editorial job from the ones that decide if an article is publishing-worthy or needs amends. What would be the use of this? Hard to believe that it was just the nature of things, since quite often the DPR team mingles in the comments and adds sarcastic one-liners.
Shame for this tactic. And if it was really unintentional, then DPR needs a professional editor-in-chief to moderate (and whip into shape) a decent attitude inside the house.

Perhaps, but if so I don't blame them for trying. I do detect a more personal angle (opinion) to some recent posts, and these guys have a lot of experience handling lots of different equipment so they are well placed to offer opinion.

It would also, possibly, be a little hypocritical to call out manufacturers for not innovating while trying to keep their site exactly the same as it's always been.

It's even possible, perhaps, they have detected a maturing aspect to us, their fan-club, in how we conduct ourselves in discussions, and so may feel we are now ready to handle it.

If so, it will be interesting to see how it plays out.

But I do wonder if M5 sells well over christmas, to people moving into more enthusiast style photography, and those people find their way here to learn more about it, how will they feel about seeing a headline from an editor saying 'disappointing'. Especially as it seems a very nice camera.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 14:55 UTC
On article 6K here we come: Here's the new Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH5 (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

FLruckas: m 4/3 is lens limited via nyquist limit just above 4k.

for 6k you need an APS-C sensor.

6k is wasted on this sensor size.

But it won't keep this camera from selling like hotcakes.

Why?

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 14:30 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Don't worry, I'm sure you'll recover, GAS can be a very uncomfortable condition, but it passes.

With all the jumping around, it's hard to pinpoint what you are actually disappointed in. I think I've narrowed it down to:

It has direct control dials and comfortable grip.
It uses a 24MP dual pixel sensor.
It has a built in high resolution EVF.
It has an articulating rear screen.
It has a built in flash.
It takes photos.
It can take and transfer them wirelessly.
A guy in a suit spoke a few years ago about something that didn't happen.
It doesn't have 4K video.
It doesn't have a built in toaster, or mind control, or something.
Samsung took away your NX1.

Personally, I like a lightweight camera that just lets me get on with capturing without it getting in the way. Well placed direct control dials and a comfortable grip are a great starting point for an enjoyable shooting experience.

M5 may not be a swiss army opto-electronic device like Sony, but it does seem to be a very nice camera.

Best CANON mirrorless to date.
Possibly best value mirrorless for features actually used by most users?

There is a disturbing trend in ILC, which is to move products to high cost high margin status.

Olympus released one mirrorless this year, the Pen-F at $1199. Last year, Panasonic released the GX8 for $1199. GX8 didn't sell and is now on clearance for under $700.

Even Sony released A6000 at $799 with kit lens, but the 2016 A6300 update is now $1000 body only or $1150 with the same kit lens.

With global growth rates at around 2.8% for the last 2 years, that seems a 30% (+) actual price increase, but I'll leave that to economists.

Olympus Imaging lost ¥50 Billion in the last 5 years, including the ¥4B forecast for this FY. In their annual report they plan:

"Break even despite reduced sales."
"Strengthen sales of high margin ILC products."

Fleece the faithful?

At $979 the M5 is not cheap, but it's nice to see prices going down, and post xmas it will likely be lower still.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 13:57 UTC

Don't worry, I'm sure you'll recover, GAS can be a very uncomfortable condition, but it passes.

With all the jumping around, it's hard to pinpoint what you are actually disappointed in. I think I've narrowed it down to:

It has direct control dials and comfortable grip.
It uses a 24MP dual pixel sensor.
It has a built in high resolution EVF.
It has an articulating rear screen.
It has a built in flash.
It takes photos.
It can take and transfer them wirelessly.
A guy in a suit spoke a few years ago about something that didn't happen.
It doesn't have 4K video.
It doesn't have a built in toaster, or mind control, or something.
Samsung took away your NX1.

Personally, I like a lightweight camera that just lets me get on with capturing without it getting in the way. Well placed direct control dials and a comfortable grip are a great starting point for an enjoyable shooting experience.

M5 may not be a swiss army opto-electronic device like Sony, but it does seem to be a very nice camera.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 10:24 UTC as 84th comment | 2 replies
On article Canon EOS M5: What you need to know (548 comments in total)
In reply to:

jacketpotato: Canon now complete the picture with primes, a few fast primes, macro, fastish zooms.

Things to like specswise.

Sizewise quite cute.

I'd appreciated different colours : purple, red, white, titanium : that's just me.

Not really. An E-M1 with a 300/4 lens is no longer compact or light. A GX8 is not compact to begin with, being larger than some DSLRs. The M5 with some lens is as compact as the E-M1 with similar lenses. Check camerasize to see http://j.mp/2cTAb1F

The 40mm/2.8 pancake is a great performer, and great size with the adapter on the M5.

Where Canon has been clever is in keeping their M lenses very compact. They have done this by using slower apertures. This is initially unattractive to enthusiasts, but some of the lenses are still very nice with very good image quality, and the extra size of APS-C over M43 sensor helps even out comparative performance.

Their current M strategy is almost identical to EF-S, offering nearly the same zooms, and then 2 primes, one of which is macro.

The main missing lens is M version of EF-S 17-55mm F/2.8, the standard fast zoom. I'd expect this gap to be filled soon if the M5 does well.

But there are already enough lens options for a compact travel kit.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2016 at 12:46 UTC
In reply to:

barrym1966: maybe when they make one that can do 1000 shots without a grip I will try one out

It probably already will. The 295 is a CIPA rating, which if the camera includes a built in flash, requires, about a third, of the shots to use flash, IIRC.

When then Nikon 1 V2 went on fire sale prices, a contributor to one of the magazines, Photography Magazine I think, picked one up for a real would review. It was CIPA rated 310, but with careful use they got something crazy like 2200 shots from it.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 18:51 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Just look at that photo of the M5 on the palm and tell me Canon don't know how to make cameras.

Just look at the covering texture, waiting patiently yet eagerly to meld with your skin and become part of the hand. The shape of that grip enticing your fingers to assume the position, and that knurled knob around the shutter release, just itching to whizz through the available shutter speeds or apertures with a simple twitch of a single finger muscle.

Oh yes, Canon know cameras.

But I hope they learn to know users too.

Two important features I don't see mentioned.

1. Charging from USB
2. Proper use of exposure compensation in manual mode with auto ISO.

Both ominously absent from M3.

USB charging is a big factor in whether equipment gets to come with me or not. It's why I take my Sony A7 instead of my E-M5.

I like control, and I like assistance too. But when auto ISO is being naughty and getting things wrong, I like a way to tell it that too, via EC.

Has Canon been learning too?

@Interestingness yes it's a real scenario, but granted not a common one.

More typical would be using my camera in the morning, finding somewhere for lunch, use a battery to recharge my camera and then on to the afternoon shoot.

Another scenario might simply be finding myself in a hotel room with a single available power outlet. Plugging the battery into the outlet and two devices into the battery means I wake up to charged devices and battery.

But it's about bulk too.

Depending on where I go, my travel gear may include:

Nearly always:

Electric Shaver
Electric toothbrush
Cellular hotspot
Mobile phone
Tablet
Bose Bluetooth speaker
Bluetooth headphones
WD Portable wifi hard drive
Camera
Portable battery.

Some trip specific items:

Laptop
Water purifier
Walkie talkies
Cooler/fan
Heater
Satellite phone
Insect repeller
Tourch/light
2nd camera
Flashes

And then my girlfriend has her stuff too.

If every item needed its own specific charger. I'd be looking at 15 to 30 chargers.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 18:01 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Just look at that photo of the M5 on the palm and tell me Canon don't know how to make cameras.

Just look at the covering texture, waiting patiently yet eagerly to meld with your skin and become part of the hand. The shape of that grip enticing your fingers to assume the position, and that knurled knob around the shutter release, just itching to whizz through the available shutter speeds or apertures with a simple twitch of a single finger muscle.

Oh yes, Canon know cameras.

But I hope they learn to know users too.

Two important features I don't see mentioned.

1. Charging from USB
2. Proper use of exposure compensation in manual mode with auto ISO.

Both ominously absent from M3.

USB charging is a big factor in whether equipment gets to come with me or not. It's why I take my Sony A7 instead of my E-M5.

I like control, and I like assistance too. But when auto ISO is being naughty and getting things wrong, I like a way to tell it that too, via EC.

Has Canon been learning too?

@rrccad, clearly there must be a middle ground.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 16:05 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: A couple of weeks back I spent about 4 hours walking around a large mall in Thailand, about 15 camera shops I guess, some dedicated camera shops, some electronic device shops, and some brand outlets (Sony/Panasonic).

It really smacks you in the face just how far ahead of the game Canon's retail operations are. They have the biggest presence, the most space, the best displays, the best coordination and the best draw.

It's hard to expose yourself to it and not want to walk away with a Canon, and this from a guy who reads review sites everyday, knows the weaknesses, and switched from full frame Canon 5 years back to experiment with M43, Fujifilm and Sony. A regular consumer has no chance. Resistance is futile.

The M5 will almost certainly sell in significant numbers just on the strength of this presence. It will have special appeal to those with cash and an interest in trying something different yet trusted and familiar.

The lens may not inspire, but are light, compact and they work.

Not in terms of scale (widespreadness?), it's about the severity of the consequences in combination with the relatively high scope for misinterpretation in a country where English is very poorly understood even by those claiming to speak it.

Tourist are generally sheltered from this aspect, and even long stay tourists like myself have been too in the past.

But since the change, ever tighting controls over people's location in conjunction with the new Bangkok internet gateway (listening post) means that discussing simply for the sake of it, say in a photography forum, offers little benefit in comparison to the low, but severe risk, that something might be misinterpreted and subsequently picked up.

When I took my camera to Cambodia and walked the streets of Phnom Penh, I discovered that 29 (known) journalist had disappeared while investigating misappropriation of NGO, WTO and WHO funds.

If I were now sitting at a bar in Cambodia, I would not have just written the above.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 13:27 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Just look at that photo of the M5 on the palm and tell me Canon don't know how to make cameras.

Just look at the covering texture, waiting patiently yet eagerly to meld with your skin and become part of the hand. The shape of that grip enticing your fingers to assume the position, and that knurled knob around the shutter release, just itching to whizz through the available shutter speeds or apertures with a simple twitch of a single finger muscle.

Oh yes, Canon know cameras.

But I hope they learn to know users too.

Two important features I don't see mentioned.

1. Charging from USB
2. Proper use of exposure compensation in manual mode with auto ISO.

Both ominously absent from M3.

USB charging is a big factor in whether equipment gets to come with me or not. It's why I take my Sony A7 instead of my E-M5.

I like control, and I like assistance too. But when auto ISO is being naughty and getting things wrong, I like a way to tell it that too, via EC.

Has Canon been learning too?

J A C S, sorry, your humor is too subtle for me. I was praising the camera design, some might even say drooling over it.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 12:46 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Just look at that photo of the M5 on the palm and tell me Canon don't know how to make cameras.

Just look at the covering texture, waiting patiently yet eagerly to meld with your skin and become part of the hand. The shape of that grip enticing your fingers to assume the position, and that knurled knob around the shutter release, just itching to whizz through the available shutter speeds or apertures with a simple twitch of a single finger muscle.

Oh yes, Canon know cameras.

But I hope they learn to know users too.

Two important features I don't see mentioned.

1. Charging from USB
2. Proper use of exposure compensation in manual mode with auto ISO.

Both ominously absent from M3.

USB charging is a big factor in whether equipment gets to come with me or not. It's why I take my Sony A7 instead of my E-M5.

I like control, and I like assistance too. But when auto ISO is being naughty and getting things wrong, I like a way to tell it that too, via EC.

Has Canon been learning too?

rrccad, I'm going by the DPR review for the M3, in their cons they list it as:

. Basic Auto ISO functionality

It goes back to the time when I was shooting orang-u-tan in Borneo. They move quick so need to have a fast shutter speed. The light from the canopy changes dramatically, the subject may be in light or shade from one second to the next, and the lens may already be at the widest aperture. It's just nice to have options and control, although ISO invariance is gradually changing that.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 12:40 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Just look at that photo of the M5 on the palm and tell me Canon don't know how to make cameras.

Just look at the covering texture, waiting patiently yet eagerly to meld with your skin and become part of the hand. The shape of that grip enticing your fingers to assume the position, and that knurled knob around the shutter release, just itching to whizz through the available shutter speeds or apertures with a simple twitch of a single finger muscle.

Oh yes, Canon know cameras.

But I hope they learn to know users too.

Two important features I don't see mentioned.

1. Charging from USB
2. Proper use of exposure compensation in manual mode with auto ISO.

Both ominously absent from M3.

USB charging is a big factor in whether equipment gets to come with me or not. It's why I take my Sony A7 instead of my E-M5.

I like control, and I like assistance too. But when auto ISO is being naughty and getting things wrong, I like a way to tell it that too, via EC.

Has Canon been learning too?

Fuego, two weeks on a desert island with no wall power. My solar gorilla will happily take sunlight and give charge to anything with a USB connection. The rest will stop working.

Also, when it's your back that is carrying it, every ounce matters, and even airlines are caring about ounces now, and restricting how many batteries they want you to carry.

And it's not the only fact, but if I have two pieces of competing equipment, like the A7 or E-M5, it's often the deciding factor.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 12:23 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: A couple of weeks back I spent about 4 hours walking around a large mall in Thailand, about 15 camera shops I guess, some dedicated camera shops, some electronic device shops, and some brand outlets (Sony/Panasonic).

It really smacks you in the face just how far ahead of the game Canon's retail operations are. They have the biggest presence, the most space, the best displays, the best coordination and the best draw.

It's hard to expose yourself to it and not want to walk away with a Canon, and this from a guy who reads review sites everyday, knows the weaknesses, and switched from full frame Canon 5 years back to experiment with M43, Fujifilm and Sony. A regular consumer has no chance. Resistance is futile.

The M5 will almost certainly sell in significant numbers just on the strength of this presence. It will have special appeal to those with cash and an interest in trying something different yet trusted and familiar.

The lens may not inspire, but are light, compact and they work.

Yes, it's obvious to me, and all English speakers there is no criticism. The problem is just having two words in the same post (even with the word 'not') is enough to trigger alerts at the Bangkok internet gateway and bring unwanted attention.

It makes it almost impossible to discuss the subject and is best not to mention it.

It may sound paranoid but there have been too many precedents to ignore. I'm here for peace and tranquility, or was 'till I met my girlfriend ;-)

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 12:09 UTC
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