Najinsky

Joined on Feb 21, 2006

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Total: 518, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Fujifilm GFX 50S added to our studio test scene (440 comments in total)
In reply to:

Holger Bargen: Pentax K1 + Pixels Shift rules!

@Azathothh

Ah don't be such a grump.

Take a look at theses beauties (from the K3.2). Not only is the detail stunning, it's fascinating too.

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/58482633

Also, the first shot in the PS sequence is the exact same shot that would be taken without PS, so if the shift sequences doesn't work, you have the ability to still get a regular shot, so there's nothing to lose and a lot to gain.

And of course you don't need PS to get ghosting, many cameras come with a shutter shock feature for where ghosting is required ;-)

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 10:35 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S added to our studio test scene (440 comments in total)

Very nice, but improvements over FF are only slight and incremental, much closer to FF than the reference camera (Phase One).

I'm waiting to see how the new Hasselblad performs on the test. Don't anticipate that much difference but the Hassy sample shots were so nice, it will be interesting to see if the monkeying around they are doing with the 14/16 bit thing allows for any improvement in the result.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 05:48 UTC as 5th comment | 2 replies
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S added to our studio test scene (440 comments in total)
In reply to:

Holger Bargen: Pentax K1 + Pixels Shift rules!

True. Pixel shift eliminates the need for 'debayering' providing a separate colour information for each location. Essentially you are getting 3-4 times more information for the scene and the results truly speak for themselves, absolutely stunning and with extremely low artifacts.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 05:14 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (888 comments in total)

Not so much wrong answers as wrong questions, perhaps.

I think the relevant questions relate to how well any given finder satisfy my requirements.

I switched from a 20D to a 5D, the OVF experience was like going from looking through a tunnel to looking through a window. Optical finders, different experiences.

The primary requirement from a good finder is I want to see the frame big, bright and covered.

EVFs started out poor and objectionable in every respect; small, dim, grainy, flickery, laggy. They weren't preferred, simply tolerated due to Hobson's choice.

But they have progressed tremendously in all areas.

If an EVF passes your standards, then they start to reveal their unique party tricks: exposure/effect simulation, warning blinkies, magnification, focus peaking, etc.

These are useful tools to have in the locker.

But it still comes down to Hobson's choice, most people just enjoy or tolerate the finder that came with the camera they chose using a variety of other criteria.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 07:46 UTC as 162nd comment | 2 replies

Disgraceful that it took so long. This tactic of using power and red tape to delay and deny justice is way too common and typically used by government and large corporations against individuals and small groups.

Justice should be one of the cornerstones of a governments obligation to the people, and unless justice is swift, the lessons learned are negatated or Ignored and the injustices linger.

Edit: I do think the amount being sought in compensation was stupidly high, the amount awarded at least demonstrates some common sense.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 07:34 UTC as 5th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Mike Evangelist: There's a good before & after image on PetaPixel. - https://petapixel.com/2017/03/09/may-captured-last-shots-azure-window-standing/

Not only that, it becomes more understandable why before and after shots were so slow in coming in. That vantage point is grueling, straight into the face with vast quantities of sea spray and gusty wind, only the best weather sealed cameras need apply. You really get a sense of this from the videos.

The unexpected bonus from the link is where Gilbert shares his best shots from when the window was there. Some of the best I've seen.

It's also (possibly) interesting that DPR didn't get access to this content and we all went looking around the net to find more. Maybe something for DPR to contemplate in their quest to increase engagement in the site.

Anyway, great find and thanks for sharing the link.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 18:20 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: From the linked story:

"A three-month geological study published in 2013 had concluded that while erosion was inevitable, the structure was not in imminent danger of collapsing.

At the time, geologists had said that the Azure Window was likely to survive for "decades" to come."

Hmmmm, my spidey senses are tingling, something may not be on the level here, and I'm not talking about the collapsed bridge...

Chill William, if you look for demons everywhere you will surely find them.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 13:10 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Evangelist: I can't believe there's not a single set of decent before/after shots taken from the same location/perspective/crop so you can actually compare them.

I had exactly the same thought as Mike and was going to post the same. But then I realized it seems to be the entire stack that collapsed, taking the bridge with it and there is literally nothing left to see of it now, and where it previously joined the cliff is now just another costal cliff, as can be seen in the after photos (both Staphanie's and others elsewhere on the net).

I still agree that lack of a common 'vantage' point adds to the confusion.

Perhaps getting to that same vantage point requires a bit of a trek, and as they can see from a different vantage point that there is nothing left to see, why make the Trek? Or perhaps because the authorities are asking people not to gather at the area, it may not be practical or allowed to get to the same vantage point.

I do agree, there is a lot of interest in seeing more easily comparable after shots, and no doubt some will turn up.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 08:52 UTC

From the linked story:

"A three-month geological study published in 2013 had concluded that while erosion was inevitable, the structure was not in imminent danger of collapsing.

At the time, geologists had said that the Azure Window was likely to survive for "decades" to come."

Hmmmm, my spidey senses are tingling, something may not be on the level here, and I'm not talking about the collapsed bridge...

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 08:21 UTC as 14th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Najinsky: On a dirt path in a remote village in Thailand there was an opening in the bushes that lined the track. Once I was driving past on my motorbike I glimpsed through the opening and saw a body of water lined with beautiful silver bark trees with golden yellow leaves. I made a mental note to return when I had my camera with me. And I I did, but the leaves were now more green. I got some nice shots but decided I had to return when the leaves were yellow again.

Next time I returned, there was a concrete road in place of the track, the bushes had gone, as had the silver bark trees and with them the leaves they used to carry.

This is why I take so many more photos with my iPhone these days, not only does it provide a visual and GPS record of what I saw and where, it may be the only record.

I know some people have a reflex vomit reaction at seeing the words photography and iPhone in the same postcode, but really, that's their problem. A tool is a tool, whatever it's name.

Lol, me and my ability to predict the vomit reflex, its (sic) uncanny.

Larry, just wondering if you ever stuck you head in a pot of water to see if you could make it boil? Could be a useful experiment to test just how hot and bothered you can get. I could assist by reciting grammar examples badly while taking photos of you with my iPhone while tying to make a phone call on my Ricoh compact camera.

And don't worry you don't sound like a Nazi at all, it's something much closer to a communist dictator.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 06:49 UTC

On a dirt path in a remote village in Thailand there was an opening in the bushes that lined the track. Once I was driving past on my motorbike I glimpsed through the opening and saw a body of water lined with beautiful silver bark trees with golden yellow leaves. I made a mental note to return when I had my camera with me. And I I did, but the leaves were now more green. I got some nice shots but decided I had to return when the leaves were yellow again.

Next time I returned, there was a concrete road in place of the track, the bushes had gone, as had the silver bark trees and with them the leaves they used to carry.

This is why I take so many more photos with my iPhone these days, not only does it provide a visual and GPS record of what I saw and where, it may be the only record.

I know some people have a reflex vomit reaction at seeing the words photography and iPhone in the same postcode, but really, that's their problem. A tool is a tool, whatever it's name.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 21:24 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Fois Giovanni: BTW, it´s time to take more Pisa tower photos ....

LOL, nice comment. Although I visited the leaning tower 3 times, I never got a shot I'd care to share. I got the obligatory one of my (then) wife heroically holding up the tower with her hands, which was fun to show friends, I never managed any serious take on the tower. They were either same same or just fail.

Not sure more trips would help, unless I was alone and untethered from family duties and tour schedules.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 21:02 UTC
In reply to:

tetsumo: I wonder why they take all the pictures using the LCD and not the Viewfinder, for me a viewfinder is a requirement.

@Hachu21

"Edit : grilled by Najinsky"

Not at all. We both said the same thing at the same time. You with elegant efficiency, me with my usual excessive verbiage.

;-)

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 17:42 UTC

Excellent content. Not sure what I enjoyed more, the story telling, the video work or seeing Barney in a pinny.

Only slight criticism would be I don't feel there was enough feedback on how you both felt the camera performed. General impressions seem that it performed very well and the compact size and easy of use were appreciated.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 11:49 UTC as 54th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

tetsumo: I wonder why they take all the pictures using the LCD and not the Viewfinder, for me a viewfinder is a requirement.

It's a lot easier to find more interesting angles and points of view when your eye (and the head, neck and torso that comes with it) isn't tethered to a viewfinder.

For me, I find I can take more interesting photos using the freedom of the rear screen, especially if it tilts.

But it's not a one size fits all kind of thing, for telephoto shooting such as wildlife or sports, I find a viewfinder still provides a better shooting experience. Also when shooting in bright sunlight it can make the screen difficult to see, so a viewfinder is preferred then too.

That's why I prefer the M6 to the M5, an optional finder allows for an even smaller package, but still have access to a viewfinder when appropriate.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 11:45 UTC

Shame, it really was a hands on, I was hoping for a hands off look too. Is there a reason you didn't show it in use?

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2017 at 10:01 UTC as 67th comment
On article Canon PowerShot G9 X II sample gallery (108 comments in total)

Very nice. Perhaps a little too punchy and too saturated for some tastes but looking beyond that, there is oodles of detail, well controlled noise and fairly nice transitions from focus to OOF. Hard to imagine a 1" sensor delivering much more that this at the moment.

Perhaps Nikon also got hold of a pre-production copy and that's what sealed the fate of the DL ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 13:07 UTC as 32nd comment
On article Sony FE 85mm F1.8 sample gallery and first impressions (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

John C Tharp: Sony's working hard to eat Canikon's lunch- an 85/1.8 USM this lens ain't, what little axial CA (LoCA) exists is surprisingly unobtrusive, similar to Sigma's Art primes.

Now if Sony would just release a full-frame E-mount body that can compete with the ergonomics and responsiveness of a 5D IV or D500 (and presumably D7x0 and D8x0 replacements).

Interesting that the headline image is of food. Aside from the front focus, the resulting OOF area of the blackberries have a slightly green tinge, presumably the green fringing referred to, but giving the blackberries a hint of mold.

So no, no lunch eating for me, just a loss of appetite!

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 03:42 UTC
On article Google AI adds detail to low-resolution images (150 comments in total)

8 bit RGB x 8 x 8 =
256 x 256 x 256 x 8 x 8 =
~1 billion source combinations

Given there are 7b people on the planet it's already down to1 in 7 accuracy at best.

And that's assuming the source is a simple face portrait. It could be a full body shot, in an infinite number of poses. Or a cat. Or a bowl of fruit, or a fish bowl, with one fish, or two, or seven, or a mountain, or a field, or a flower, or a mountain surrounded by fields of flowers, or a picture of mar, or the Milky Way, or or or...

The kind of accuracy that gets plumbers shot on subways by anti terrorist squads...

Link | Posted on Feb 10, 2017 at 19:13 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Najinsky: This has the potential to be a polarising issue between enthusiasts and imaging professionals.

IPs have to eat many costs associated with providing their service, of which this is just one. The costs are factored into their pricing and so increases get passed onto their customers and for the most part they are not unduly impacted. However, customers can also shop around for a better deal, so if IPs are forced to raise their prices, it can impact their competitiveness in an already competitive field.

But a bigger impact is for enthusiasts, who are currently seeing price hikes come at them from every angle, and who don't have a way to offset those costs as it is primarily a hobby. I think it's feasible more and more enthusiasts may seek alternatives.

Personally, I've gradually been weaning myself off adobe products for many years. Their offerings border on cumbersome and overkill for me. And they are so slow to move. Lightroom still doesn't have full support for exploiting GPUs.

Yes, for sure, some have, but others are thriving too. It's not unique to imaging. One way to keep relevant is to have what is in demand. Another is to do what others do but do it well and keep your customers happy. Some thrive, some survive, some fall by the wayside.

Thinking you own the game is a common mistake. You always need to keep an eye on the rear view. Adobe have been thinking they own the game for a long long time, love em or hate em they have proved resilient, who knows if they are in end game or new era territory, but it has the feeling like it might be one or the other.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 20:45 UTC
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