JoeGuide

Joined on Sep 21, 2013

Comments

Total: 209, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Kostasm: If you don't like touch bar you gonna have the notch. If you don't like the notch you gonna have the touch bar. What kind of perverted torture is that?

The whining about the notch is becoming a meme.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2022 at 01:16 UTC
In reply to:

JoeGuide: I have the M1MBA with 16 bit RAM, and it can run FCPX like a champ without heating up at all. It looks like the MBA M2 will have 18% CPU and 30% GPU improvement. I don't see any reason to go Pro, unless you are a full time pro. Amazing.

Lol. Thanks for catching that. Running FCPX on 16 bit rather than 16 GB would truly be amazing.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2022 at 10:19 UTC

I have the M1MBA with 16 bit RAM, and it can run FCPX like a champ without heating up at all. It looks like the MBA M2 will have 18% CPU and 30% GPU improvement. I don't see any reason to go Pro, unless you are a full time pro. Amazing.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2022 at 20:29 UTC as 55th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Dave Oddie: So is this M2chip more powerful than the M1 Ultra recently announced?

Perhaps slightly on single thread performance but nowhere near the Ultra in multithread.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2022 at 20:22 UTC
In reply to:

mikegt: Spectacularly over-priced and under-spec'ed, a tiny box with no expansion slots whatsoever.

$3,999 for 64GB of memory and only 1TB of SSD storage. Since the 64 GB of RAM and 1 TB SSD are worth around $400 total, what is the other $3,600 for ?

Yes you can attach stuff via Thunderbolt, but it's a limiting and expensive way to go; some old-fashioned expansion card slots would of been much better for the consumer.

The tiny box housing this computer really limits cooling as well as expandability; in the I.T. world Apple computers are often referred to as "frybabies" for their tendency to overheat. The cause of this is Apple's prioritizing design over function; the Mac Studio is a perfect example of this.

Again, if you have to ask, you don't need it or understand the value.

This is for professionals who want the best desktop available without the hassle of noise and constant maintenance or upgrade. They run professional programs that have certain specifications that are not likely to change, so little need for constant upgrade or expandability. Storage is done externally on RAIDS via TB4. $10,000 is the just the price of business, and written off as a depreciable asset. After several years, they buy a brand new computer because at the end of the day, Mac Studio is a tool to get work done, albeit a mighty fine tool for people who need.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2022 at 13:29 UTC
In reply to:

StoneJack: For Mac Studio, the wait is already like 10 weeks, seems these things are already a big hit. Most pros buys the most expensive thing with Ultra chips and raise storage up to 4-8TB. I think consumers are fine with normal M1 mini, its good enough for 90% of tasks, especially if you don't heavy 8K video on it (4k is handled great by Mini M1)

Agreed. The A series/M1 chips runs across the line, bringing economy of scale which was previously unimaginable for a single company to bring. It brings best in class chips for all their products. Even the cheapest iPad, which is less than $330 gives you best in class leading performance.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2022 at 13:12 UTC
In reply to:

mikegt: Spectacularly over-priced and under-spec'ed, a tiny box with no expansion slots whatsoever.

$3,999 for 64GB of memory and only 1TB of SSD storage. Since the 64 GB of RAM and 1 TB SSD are worth around $400 total, what is the other $3,600 for ?

Yes you can attach stuff via Thunderbolt, but it's a limiting and expensive way to go; some old-fashioned expansion card slots would of been much better for the consumer.

The tiny box housing this computer really limits cooling as well as expandability; in the I.T. world Apple computers are often referred to as "frybabies" for their tendency to overheat. The cause of this is Apple's prioritizing design over function; the Mac Studio is a perfect example of this.

"$3,999 for 64GB of memory and only 1TB of SSD storage. Since the 64 GB of RAM and 1 TB SSD are worth around $400 total, what is the other $3,600 for ?"

The $3600 gives you probably the fastest desktop with one of the fastest CPU and GPU performance in a very tidy, quiet and efficient package. If you have to ask, you don't need it.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2022 at 13:02 UTC
On article Nikon Z 24-70mm F2.8 S field review (505 comments in total)
In reply to:

JoeGuide: @Ying Yon.
"The Nikon Z 24-70m F2.8 S garners a Silver Award because it's a solid fast mid-range zoom that has no severe shortcomings that would stop us from recommending it. The same can't be said about similar offerings for other systems."

"Other systems," plural meaning more that one, in the context of FF ML in the 24-70 f2.8 range. I'm going to have to think long and hard about what they meant.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2022 at 16:56 UTC
On article Nikon Z 24-70mm F2.8 S field review (505 comments in total)

@Ying Yon.
"The Nikon Z 24-70m F2.8 S garners a Silver Award because it's a solid fast mid-range zoom that has no severe shortcomings that would stop us from recommending it. The same can't be said about similar offerings for other systems."

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2022 at 16:13 UTC as 88th comment | 4 replies

Light field sacrifices 2D resolution for 3D rendering. Human binocular vision is similar, having a extra eye to give us depth perception. With a loss of an eye, mundane tasks become difficult, and in most states, you will not be able to drive, and certainly not on highways.

Light field would complement LiDAR for driving to not only avoid obstacles but also identify what the obstacles are to avoid. For industrial use, you can use it array them in 3 axis or a rotating gantry to provide exacting 3D information.

Lytro was a failure because it had little use for general photographers who have little need for real time 3D rendering. Where it have been useful is macro small animal (insect) photography and video, allowing for simultaneous live stacked focusing.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2021 at 12:35 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

JoeGuide: This should put to rest the false narrative that Nikon will go out of business or lack innovation. Nikon has been profitable for several quarters, and will likely stay profitable although with a smaller market share. They may pick up some new users along the way.

Sure Sony had the means (especially as a tech conglomerate both financially and technology) to have made a shutterless camera, but they didn't and therefore lost an opportunity to secure their technical reputation. But last week, Nikon has stolen their spot light. Given the comparative price advantage of the Z9, both Sony and Canon will likely make shutterless cameras soon.

When the D700 came out, I was amazed but couldn't justify the purchase. In retrospective, it would have lasted me a decade of use. I think when the Z8 comes out, I will be first in line to purchase it.

/edited for poor grammar

I would agree that for some photographers, shutter can be useful, such as high speed flash. But although it can be used for studio photography, its main purpose is for professional wildlife or sports photography (where flash is generally not permitted). So too A1 and R3.

Your argument that you need not worry about shutter failure because you can chose never to use it doesn't make a lot sense. So you are arguing to pay an additional $1000 to $1400 dollars for a feature you chose not to use or afraid to use.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2021 at 18:51 UTC
In reply to:

Dragonrider: The pricing is interesting. Maybe moving manufacturing to Thailand gives them a little cost advantage, but Canon's automation most likely counters that. Clearly, the price will catch some folks attention, but it also will have the effect of depressing what they can ask for a D8. All in all, a pretty risky move in a time of high inflation. You can always cut prices after introduction, but raising them is very hard. The GM Saturn experiment is a good long term study in how well non-discountable pricing works out. Not well.

Thom Hogan for years have said that the cost of production of ML will be less than DSLR due to not having to manufacture and calibrate prisms, mirror, AF modules production. Now with the removal of an expensive shutter, the price comes down further. Perhaps the question is not that Nikon will make money from Z9 (because they will certainly make money) but how much price gouging can Canon and Sony get from their customers.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2021 at 18:27 UTC
In reply to:

JoeGuide: This should put to rest the false narrative that Nikon will go out of business or lack innovation. Nikon has been profitable for several quarters, and will likely stay profitable although with a smaller market share. They may pick up some new users along the way.

Sure Sony had the means (especially as a tech conglomerate both financially and technology) to have made a shutterless camera, but they didn't and therefore lost an opportunity to secure their technical reputation. But last week, Nikon has stolen their spot light. Given the comparative price advantage of the Z9, both Sony and Canon will likely make shutterless cameras soon.

When the D700 came out, I was amazed but couldn't justify the purchase. In retrospective, it would have lasted me a decade of use. I think when the Z8 comes out, I will be first in line to purchase it.

/edited for poor grammar

@Funny Valentine. As BacktoNature said, if the shutter is frozen in the closed or partial closed position, you aren't going be taking any pictures, electronic shutter or otherwise. Also no one will want to buy it secondhand until you fix the problem.

Z9 is bulky because it allows for proper portrait hand grip position, larger batter, and better hear dissipation for extended 4/8K videotaping unlike the R3 or A1. It has nothing to do with the shutter mechanism.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2021 at 18:19 UTC
In reply to:

JoeGuide: This should put to rest the false narrative that Nikon will go out of business or lack innovation. Nikon has been profitable for several quarters, and will likely stay profitable although with a smaller market share. They may pick up some new users along the way.

Sure Sony had the means (especially as a tech conglomerate both financially and technology) to have made a shutterless camera, but they didn't and therefore lost an opportunity to secure their technical reputation. But last week, Nikon has stolen their spot light. Given the comparative price advantage of the Z9, both Sony and Canon will likely make shutterless cameras soon.

When the D700 came out, I was amazed but couldn't justify the purchase. In retrospective, it would have lasted me a decade of use. I think when the Z8 comes out, I will be first in line to purchase it.

/edited for poor grammar

There are two advantages. First cost difference for Z9 to A1 is $1000, and add A1 grip and it's now $1400. Second durability. All mechanical shutters will eventually need to be repaired or replaced. This is a liability for camera makers. In fact there is a class action suit against Sony A7iii for premature shutter failure going on now, and Nikon learned a valuable lesson from the D600 shutter oil issues.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2021 at 17:44 UTC

This should put to rest the false narrative that Nikon will go out of business or lack innovation. Nikon has been profitable for several quarters, and will likely stay profitable although with a smaller market share. They may pick up some new users along the way.

Sure Sony had the means (especially as a tech conglomerate both financially and technology) to have made a shutterless camera, but they didn't and therefore lost an opportunity to secure their technical reputation. But last week, Nikon has stolen their spot light. Given the comparative price advantage of the Z9, both Sony and Canon will likely make shutterless cameras soon.

When the D700 came out, I was amazed but couldn't justify the purchase. In retrospective, it would have lasted me a decade of use. I think when the Z8 comes out, I will be first in line to purchase it.

/edited for poor grammar

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2021 at 17:23 UTC as 147th comment | 22 replies
On article Nikon Z9 review: a DSLR-like stills/video monster (3182 comments in total)
In reply to:

Akpinxit: it is been a long time since Nikon was more daring and imaginative then Sony , but now they've done it

@ModelA1. More like Nikon imagined a Sony A1 but a camera that a professional photographer can really use day in and day out. Also with an integrated grip. ;)

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2021 at 16:16 UTC
On article Nikon Z9 review: a DSLR-like stills/video monster (3182 comments in total)

This is expected good news. As a Nikon user, I had little doubt Nikon would pull it off, and affirms my decision to stick to the brand I had grown up with. My Z6 and Z50 have been robust and durable cameras which can capture exceptional images. If I were a better photographer with interest in wildlife or sports, I would consider saving up for Z9. I am surprised that the price is within reach of us, mere mortals.

Despite the stupid, petty spec arguments, Z9 has brought parity with the rest of the brands and leaves no doubt about the technical prowess of Nikon. Quite frankly, what more can any photographer need beyond this level of technical performance. If you can't get exceptional images from this level of camera, Z9, R3 or A1, then all quibbling about spec belies the point, which is that you probably aren't very good at taking picture or have not taken the time to learn to use your tool.

This is good news for all photographers who actually capture images.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2021 at 12:50 UTC as 294th comment
On article Nikon Z9 review: a DSLR-like stills/video monster (3182 comments in total)
In reply to:

wcan: As a Z6 owner, I am now comfortable staying with Nikon for the future.

Been thrashing my Z6 for 3 years, and I found it to be robust and durable as well as exceptional at capturing images.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2021 at 12:27 UTC
On article Nikon Z9 review: a DSLR-like stills/video monster (3182 comments in total)
In reply to:

Orion09: But..... but.... Tonah said (yesterday even before the official launch) that people are already MAD about about the Z9........ I'm confused now!

Sony Northrup and his wife has an all expense paid Hawaii vacation lined up by sponsor, so what did you expect.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2021 at 12:19 UTC
On article Nikon Z9 review: a DSLR-like stills/video monster (3182 comments in total)
In reply to:

Auricom 007: I'm still on cloud9. It's pretty safe to say Nikon brings the goods. Their optical offerings are among the best & in most cases class leading.

@David Cartagena. "Not every Nikon lens(es) are marvels." Don't bring a dull knife to a gun fight. Proportionally, there are far more Sony duds than Nikons by far. In fact, Sony had to upgrade the embarrassingly poor 70-200 in less than 5 years after release because it was such a lackluster lens. You should read up a bit about Nikon Z lens before spouting about lens performance. Really, spend some time reading reviews of the Z lens or trying them out, and then come back and let's have a informed discussion about lenses.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2021 at 11:52 UTC
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