Bill Ferris

Bill Ferris

Lives in United States Flagstaff, AZ, United States
Has a website at billferris.photoshelter.com
Joined on Oct 12, 2013
About me:

Photographer capturing decisive moments in landscape, portraiture, wildlife, sports and events

Comments

Total: 152, showing: 141 – 152
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In reply to:

Jan Itor: As the photo is a remake of the real event, it's all fake anyway

There was nothing fake about the second flag raising. It was a genuine moment captured on film and has served to inspire millions. The photo is certainly a worthy representation of the fighting spirit, and dedication to duty and values of the United Startes Marine Corps.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 20:08 UTC
In reply to:

George Zip: I have seen that photo a lot of times. I honestly always thought it was a staged shot because it looked so "perfect". I am not from the USA.

Just did some reading, apparently it is not staged, but the photographer was accused of staging it.

https://vimeo.com/170182098

If you start watching at the 7:00 mark, there's a clip of Joe Rosenthal describing the flag-raising and how the scene unfolded to result in his iconic photo. Yes, he was on the scene to document the flag going up. Yes, the photo captures a genuine moment.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 17:37 UTC
On article Accessory Review: Peak Design Slide Camera Sling strap (147 comments in total)

I'm another Slide user, a Peak Design customer who invested in their 2013 Kickstarter campaign to fund the 2nd gen Capture Camera Clip. I've used PD products, including Slide, to carry camera gear through weeks and miles of rugged backcountry in Grand Canyon National Park and all I can say is: Peak Design products are the most thoughtfully, artfully and ingeniously designed kit I've ever used. The beauty of the Peak Design system is that it literally takes just a few seconds to go from securely carrying your camera over rugged terrain, to comfortably walking around with the camera by your side to locking your camera in place atop a tripod of a rock solid timed exposure. Without hesitation, I give Slide a 5-star rating. If I could give it 6 stars, I would...but that would kinda defeat the purpose of a 5-star system.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2016 at 16:23 UTC as 63rd comment | 1 reply

Meanwhile back in the real world, photographers who actually use cameras and lenses to make pictures they sell to earn a living are blown away by the D5.

http://oleliodden.com/photo-gear/field-reviews/beta-test-report-nikon-d5/

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2016 at 04:33 UTC as 133rd comment | 13 replies

To my eye, the D5 at ISO 51200 is very usable. It's amazing to me that digital imaging has progressed so incredibly far in the last 10 years. A decade ago, ISO 51200 would have been pure marketing hype. Today, it's a usable shot.

Comparing the D5 to the D4s and 1DX at ISO 51200, the D5 image is both sharper and cleaner. In many regards, Is rate the D5 image at ISO 51200 as good as the 1DX image at ISO 25600. The edge isn't as significant in comparison to the D4s.

When you consider that Nikon achieved improved low light performance while increasing both resolution and frame rate, it's very impressive. I'm quite interested to see in-depth testing of the D5's AF performance. If it's able to focus more quickly, with greater accuracy and in lower light, that will be a real achievement. Give a wildlife photographer another 15 minutes of shoot time before sunrise or a couple more chances at capturing "the moment" in a short burst, and you give that photographer the world.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 16:49 UTC as 87th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: I would take with a large grain of salt the recommendation of the A7RII as a "gem" for wedding photographers. An environment where mixed color temperature lighting is at play is a text book situation for shooting RAW. Shooting RAW can lead to buffer overload on the A7RII.

Check out Matt Granger's recent video on this very issue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnFLZcGgerU

To those who would discount Granger's comments as "hating on Sony," I'd point out that Granger owns an A7RII, really likes the image quality, the size and 4K video capability. He's spoken highly of the camera in previous videos but also offers candid honest critiques, when appropriate.

I applaud Sony for being on the bleeding edge of advancing the mirrorless camera platform. The A7-series bodies have a lot to offer. That said, they also have fairly significant limitations that, for working professionals, have the potential to be deal breakers.

If you're talking about the 5DS and 5DSr, I'd wager file size, alone, is reason enough for most wedding photogs to stear clear. The 5DIII is another story. That body is already in a lot of pro shooters' bags and will probably still be in use years from now. As enticing as the high megapixel bodies may seem, there are a lot of subjects and situations where a camera in the low- to mid-20's in megapixels with fast, accurate low-light AF and a decent burst rate (not to mention dual card slots and good battery life) hits a real sweet spot.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2015 at 13:42 UTC
In reply to:

DjHonda: All of the pictures from this article could have been easily taken with Nikon D90 and you wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Let's stop buying new bodies people, it really doesn't make a difference unless you are a pro.

As a longtime D90 owner, I have to respectfully disagree. At the risk of initiating a new Facebook meme, one does not simply make usable images with the D90 at ISO 3200 and higher. The D90 autofocus is OK but not nearly as capable as the D610 (my current body) and presumably nowhere near the equal of the D750. Given the conditions described by the author at the wedding, I seriously doubt a D90's AF would have been up to the challenge. As with all such discussions, YMMV.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 21:24 UTC

I would take with a large grain of salt the recommendation of the A7RII as a "gem" for wedding photographers. An environment where mixed color temperature lighting is at play is a text book situation for shooting RAW. Shooting RAW can lead to buffer overload on the A7RII.

Check out Matt Granger's recent video on this very issue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnFLZcGgerU

To those who would discount Granger's comments as "hating on Sony," I'd point out that Granger owns an A7RII, really likes the image quality, the size and 4K video capability. He's spoken highly of the camera in previous videos but also offers candid honest critiques, when appropriate.

I applaud Sony for being on the bleeding edge of advancing the mirrorless camera platform. The A7-series bodies have a lot to offer. That said, they also have fairly significant limitations that, for working professionals, have the potential to be deal breakers.

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2015 at 17:42 UTC as 14th comment | 3 replies
On article 2015 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $1200-2000 (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rich Rosen: Even if we allow for changes in technology, I do not understand how the Sony with an 82 score from DPR was rated best, while the Nikon D610 with a 87 score wasn't even rated in the top 3. Actually I do understand. The top three are mirrorless. I am guessing that DPR (amazon) sees more potential in selling that type of camera, as opposed to the "old and tired" DSLR.

Among the advances Sony made in the two years since the D610 was introduced...the A7II, breaking new ground with the following:

- lower IQ
- "Meh" low light performance
- mediocre AF
- awful battery life
- one less SD card slot
- limited native lens selection
- tiny fumbly controls
- a menu that makes Nikon's seem like Apple-esque creative brilliance...now, that's an accomplishment!

Yeah, that Sony's a real industry leader.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2015 at 02:19 UTC
On article 2015 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $1200-2000 (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bjrn SWE: Intresting that a camera rated 82% is considered better than a cam at 87.

@Richard Butler - I know a guy who does impeccable restoration work on TARDISs and would be happy to share his contact info, if you're interested.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2015 at 00:20 UTC
On article 2015 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $1200-2000 (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bjrn SWE: Intresting that a camera rated 82% is considered better than a cam at 87.

The Nikon D610, a full-frame camera, earned an 87 and a gold rating. Apparently, DP Review gives as much credence to their reviews as the rest of us.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2015 at 14:49 UTC
In reply to:

Paul B Jones: Very nimble of Nikon to respond to Tamron and Sigma's big telezooms. I was thinking those 150-600s must be eating into the intro level big telephoto market. Interesting to see what Canon does.

Regarding the Canon 100-400 II, it's s lens that has a reputation for being very sharp and performing quite well with a 1.4x teleconverter. Even cropped, it will at least give the 150-600's a run for the money. It's also physically smaller and lighter weight...a lot of photogs might prefer this over the competition. As a Nikon shooter, I'm hopeful the IQ of the 200-500, along with being faster at the long end of its zoom range, will give it an advantage over the 150-600's.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2015 at 23:10 UTC
Total: 152, showing: 141 – 152
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