Bill Ferris

Bill Ferris

Lives in United States Flagstaff, AZ, United States
Has a website at billferris.photoshelter.com
Joined on Oct 12, 2013
About me:

Photographer capturing decisive moments in landscape, portraiture, wildlife, sports and events

Comments

Total: 153, showing: 21 – 40
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On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

vbuhay: When I first saw your image, I right away knew it would win. Congrats....

Vic, thank you. I truly appreciate your note and hope you've had an overnight to see and enjoy the comet.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 00:39 UTC
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter Del: I thought it was a great image when I saw it in a Forum. A well deserved winner.

Peter, you're most gracious. Thank you.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 00:37 UTC
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: For perched birds, static or slow moving subjects in bright light, these lenses could be a hit. The price is certainly right for the enthusiast. That's assuming they're pin sharp wide open. (Does it even make sense to use the phrase, wide open, and f/11 in the same sentence?) If you have to close to f/13 or slower for best performance, get ready for the trash bin of history.

Interesting. Clearly, I had missed that little tidbit about being a fixed f/11 on the two primes. I gotta give Canon credit for some original thinking with that approach. I would also assume their optical engineers optimized performance across the field with these lenses. If they're anything except very sharp with minimal aberrations, I'd be surprised.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2020 at 01:48 UTC

For perched birds, static or slow moving subjects in bright light, these lenses could be a hit. The price is certainly right for the enthusiast. That's assuming they're pin sharp wide open. (Does it even make sense to use the phrase, wide open, and f/11 in the same sentence?) If you have to close to f/13 or slower for best performance, get ready for the trash bin of history.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2020 at 15:01 UTC as 42nd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

themountainphotographer: Great to see a European photography article. Thank you DPR.

I like the German cultural influence on the selection of the grand prize winner. Reading thre article, the hare has become a rare (endangered?) species in Germany. Seeing such a lovely photo of a disappearing native animal must have touched the hearts of the judges in a special way.

It's similar to the way American judges and audiences respond to photos of bison, eagles, mountain lions, grizzlies and other iconic creatures that represent a continued - though strained - connection with wilderness and frontier.

So, I applaud the judges for celebrating both a great photograph and their national heritage.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2020 at 16:08 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: Jeez! It amazes me that there are people at the bottom of this page commentating about what equipment was used.

I'm not even remotely interested in which gear was used for these photos. Most of them could have been taken with almost any camera anyway.

Do people seriously look at *photographs* only to find out what gear was used?

I just look at the photos and enjoy them.

... and hopefully I learn from them, and improve my own photography.

I like seeing the gear used to make competition winners because it's usually a reminder that the difference between the work of a grand prize winner and me, is the artistry of the photographer and time they've invested in being present in fantastic light ready for the right moment. It's not like Formula One where my Pontiac Vibe has no chance of competing, let alone winning. This is photography. If you've got good gear, a great eye and the tenacity to be out doing photography on a regular basis, you'll come home with great photos.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2020 at 16:01 UTC
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: Fun video. Thanks for sharing.

I like the Rocket blower for getting dust and other particulates off class surfaces. What do you think of the Lens Pen? They've been around for decades, and are convenient but I'm on the fence as to whether or not they're useful.

The "Chris Nichols Glass-o-matic" has a nice ring to it :)

UV filters as lens front element protection = waste o' money. Seriously, they may even contribute to damaging a lens in certain situations. Reach out the Steve Perry on this one. He made a great video demonstrating the uselessness of UV filters as front element protection. But it's been a few years; maybe you guys should team up on a reboot.

UV filters are a mostly unnecessary expense in the digital age. They don't protect lenses from impact damage and they don't prevent the dreaded blue haze; an issue from the film era. Use of a lens hood is much more effective.

Link | Posted on May 14, 2020 at 03:19 UTC

Fun video. Thanks for sharing.

I like the Rocket blower for getting dust and other particulates off class surfaces. What do you think of the Lens Pen? They've been around for decades, and are convenient but I'm on the fence as to whether or not they're useful.

The "Chris Nichols Glass-o-matic" has a nice ring to it :)

UV filters as lens front element protection = waste o' money. Seriously, they may even contribute to damaging a lens in certain situations. Reach out the Steve Perry on this one. He made a great video demonstrating the uselessness of UV filters as front element protection. But it's been a few years; maybe you guys should team up on a reboot.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2020 at 20:08 UTC as 49th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

stevo23: I don't believe that we have more guns than people in the USA. I know we have an insane number and I know a lot of people like to own more than one, but nope, not more guns than people.

Here's the source for the statistic: http://www.smallarmssurvey.org/about-us/mission.html

Link | Posted on May 8, 2020 at 03:31 UTC

This article is the punctum of my DPReview experience for today. Thank you, Barney.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2020 at 18:06 UTC as 52nd comment
On article Ins and outs of ISO: where ISO gets complex (153 comments in total)

This is an excellent, informative series. I occasionally revisit the articles to gradually glean a better understanding of the topic and various factors. If I might suggest, I suspect a few readers might come to these articles with a casual understanding of what amplification is and may find it a bit challenging to reconcile that with the use of that term in this article. If you were to adopt the perspective of such a reader and explain to that person in a conversational manner what analog and digital amplification are in photography, I think thay may make the series accessible to more readers.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2020 at 00:40 UTC as 26th comment
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: Five years ago, I would've doubled-down on the sentiment that, unless a camera has an audio jack, it can't be considered a serious video camera. Today, there are many reliable ways to capture and monitor audio outside the camera. In light of this reality, I'm not persuaded the removal of the audio jack is a deal-breaker. It may be for some but definitely not for all.

USB-C and audio jack aren't synonymous. An audio jack is a cylindrical pin connector design. So, while you can monitor audio through the USB-C port, it is not an audio jack.

Link | Posted on Feb 29, 2020 at 14:43 UTC

Five years ago, I would've doubled-down on the sentiment that, unless a camera has an audio jack, it can't be considered a serious video camera. Today, there are many reliable ways to capture and monitor audio outside the camera. In light of this reality, I'm not persuaded the removal of the audio jack is a deal-breaker. It may be for some but definitely not for all.

Link | Posted on Feb 29, 2020 at 06:17 UTC as 83rd comment | 4 replies
On article Nikon interview: "We’re at a transitional stage" (494 comments in total)

It's interesting that the Nikon exec readily acknowledges the lack of a vertical grip for the Zs as an oft-mentioned issue by customers and, yet, Nikon developed and released the D780 without a grip. In fact, they made an intentional decision to remove grip connectivity from their so-called "D750 replacement." What were they thinking?

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2020 at 04:21 UTC as 67th comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon interview: "We’re at a transitional stage" (494 comments in total)
In reply to:

Raziel Orlando: "We’re at a transitional stage" Then why Nikon didn't put their mirrorless tech into the D6? Seriously the D780 has more interesting specs.

Hmm, anyone interested in a D5 or D6 would have absolutely zero interest in the D780.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2020 at 04:11 UTC
On article The Nikon D750 vs D780: Should you upgrade? (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: "...maybe you'd be better off with a Z6." Therein lies the rub. D750 owners have had nearly 18 months to decide if the Z7 or Z6 offered enough to warrant an upgrade. Those who have yet to make the leap are unlikely to do so, now. Nothing has changed. For whatever reason, the Zs aren't compelling products and they're no different, today, than they were in August 2018.

So, we've got a D780 that, as a stills camera, most rational people would agree is a tough sell to D750 owners. As a video camera, it offers the same Z performancec that has not been compelling to folks who are still shooting with their D750s. So, if current D750 owners are not the market for the D780, who is?

Maybe Nikon refreshed the wrong camera. Maybe they should've released a Z6 II with a new sports-worthy AF module, two card slots and a real grip. Heck, keep the single XQD slot, add the other upgrades and offer it at the same price as the D780 with a free adapter.

User9... Maybe if Nikon tosses a refurbbed D850 in the box at no extra charge.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2020 at 14:24 UTC
On article The Nikon D750 vs D780: Should you upgrade? (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: "...maybe you'd be better off with a Z6." Therein lies the rub. D750 owners have had nearly 18 months to decide if the Z7 or Z6 offered enough to warrant an upgrade. Those who have yet to make the leap are unlikely to do so, now. Nothing has changed. For whatever reason, the Zs aren't compelling products and they're no different, today, than they were in August 2018.

So, we've got a D780 that, as a stills camera, most rational people would agree is a tough sell to D750 owners. As a video camera, it offers the same Z performancec that has not been compelling to folks who are still shooting with their D750s. So, if current D750 owners are not the market for the D780, who is?

Maybe Nikon refreshed the wrong camera. Maybe they should've released a Z6 II with a new sports-worthy AF module, two card slots and a real grip. Heck, keep the single XQD slot, add the other upgrades and offer it at the same price as the D780 with a free adapter.

flee2010, I'm a D610 owner and have no interest in the D780. I'm not alone. The D780 offers zero gain in resolution, the same clustered-in-the-center-of-the-frame AF module as the D750, only 7 fps burst and isn't compatible with a battery grip. In too many respects, the D780 is a $2,300 sideways step for both D750 and D600/610 shooters.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2020 at 14:10 UTC
On article The Nikon D750 vs D780: Should you upgrade? (322 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: "...maybe you'd be better off with a Z6." Therein lies the rub. D750 owners have had nearly 18 months to decide if the Z7 or Z6 offered enough to warrant an upgrade. Those who have yet to make the leap are unlikely to do so, now. Nothing has changed. For whatever reason, the Zs aren't compelling products and they're no different, today, than they were in August 2018.

So, we've got a D780 that, as a stills camera, most rational people would agree is a tough sell to D750 owners. As a video camera, it offers the same Z performancec that has not been compelling to folks who are still shooting with their D750s. So, if current D750 owners are not the market for the D780, who is?

Maybe Nikon refreshed the wrong camera. Maybe they should've released a Z6 II with a new sports-worthy AF module, two card slots and a real grip. Heck, keep the single XQD slot, add the other upgrades and offer it at the same price as the D780 with a free adapter.

Dan, why?

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2020 at 13:58 UTC
On article The Nikon D750 vs D780: Should you upgrade? (322 comments in total)

"...maybe you'd be better off with a Z6." Therein lies the rub. D750 owners have had nearly 18 months to decide if the Z7 or Z6 offered enough to warrant an upgrade. Those who have yet to make the leap are unlikely to do so, now. Nothing has changed. For whatever reason, the Zs aren't compelling products and they're no different, today, than they were in August 2018.

So, we've got a D780 that, as a stills camera, most rational people would agree is a tough sell to D750 owners. As a video camera, it offers the same Z performancec that has not been compelling to folks who are still shooting with their D750s. So, if current D750 owners are not the market for the D780, who is?

Maybe Nikon refreshed the wrong camera. Maybe they should've released a Z6 II with a new sports-worthy AF module, two card slots and a real grip. Heck, keep the single XQD slot, add the other upgrades and offer it at the same price as the D780 with a free adapter.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2020 at 06:42 UTC as 40th comment | 6 replies

Dan, I'll have to respectfully disagree with your assessment of the D780 as a "proper replacement for the D750." No bump in resolution, the same 51 autofocus points in OVF mode, only a modest increase in frame rate and no compatibility with a battery grip add up to the D780 being more a refresh of the D6xx line. It's a camera designed to attract D7500 shooters to full frame and it may end up being successful in that quest...but it's no upgrade for many D6xx and D750 shooters.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2020 at 02:17 UTC as 124th comment | 10 replies
Total: 153, showing: 21 – 40
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