Bill Ferris

Bill Ferris

Lives in United States Flagstaff, AZ, United States
Has a website at billferris.photoshelter.com
Joined on Oct 12, 2013
About me:

Photographer capturing decisive moments in landscape, portraiture, wildlife, sports and events

Comments

Total: 150, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)
In reply to:

StanyBuyle: I downloaded the image 14/41 (heron) in jpeg.
At 100%, it's simply unsharp.
Looking to the EXIF: 1/50 sec, f/11, ISO 100, -0.67 EV ...
Iso 100, so there was clearly enough light.
In that case, no wildlife photographer would use an 800mm lens at 1/50 sec...
At the other hand, if taken handheld, it shows the effectiveness of the stabilization

Finally, PhotoKhan, I'm the first to acknowledge neither you nor anybody else should feel any obligation to like my photographic work. That goes hand-in-hand with the fact I don't give a damn if you or anybody else likes my work. What I do with a camera, I do for me and only me.

That's why these gimmicky f/11 primes hold so little interest for me. I'm up at 4;00 AM when it's pitch dark; parking at 4:30 AM when it's still dark; Walking across an open field under starlight to be set up at the edge of the forest at 5:00 AM when only photographers and people with troubled consciences are awake. I've done that a hundred times over the last four years because of a deep belief that one of those mornings would deliver an opportunity like this: https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64238845

if you don't like my work, that's your right and privilege. If you don' like that photo, you can't call yourself a wildlife photographer. You've no idea what it means to be a wildlife photographer.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2020 at 05:16 UTC
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)
In reply to:

StanyBuyle: I downloaded the image 14/41 (heron) in jpeg.
At 100%, it's simply unsharp.
Looking to the EXIF: 1/50 sec, f/11, ISO 100, -0.67 EV ...
Iso 100, so there was clearly enough light.
In that case, no wildlife photographer would use an 800mm lens at 1/50 sec...
At the other hand, if taken handheld, it shows the effectiveness of the stabilization

I say, very few, because experienced photographers in these genres have encountered similar low light limitations as I have. They've been frustrated by shooting at f/8, f/6.3 or f/5.6 and missing a potential keeper because of weak or failing light. The laws of physics are immutable. We can't change them; we can learn to work within them.

You write that not everyone will become hooked by any particular genre of photography. You're right, which makes that condition no less pitiful. I feel sorry for anyone who doesn't feel true passion for a hobby or profession they've committed to. And I simply reject the notion that people can be equally committed to all genres. There's something that gets under your skin; that speaks to you; that inspires you to do things you'd never consider for another endeavor. If that's missing from your life, I pity you. It's magical.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2020 at 05:00 UTC
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)
In reply to:

StanyBuyle: I downloaded the image 14/41 (heron) in jpeg.
At 100%, it's simply unsharp.
Looking to the EXIF: 1/50 sec, f/11, ISO 100, -0.67 EV ...
Iso 100, so there was clearly enough light.
In that case, no wildlife photographer would use an 800mm lens at 1/50 sec...
At the other hand, if taken handheld, it shows the effectiveness of the stabilization

The same holds for evening twilight. My f/5.6 500mm lens means I'm packing up 15-20 minutes before the photog shooting with an f/4 prime. An f/11 prime would have me walking to the car and on the road a good 30-45 minutes earlier than I'm now shooting. That's simply unacceptable.

Does this mean nobody will make any good images using the Canon f/11 primes? Of course not. In fact, I would argue the most brilliant shots we'll see will be by photographers who apply these very slow primes to photographic genres most of us are ignoring. Somebody's gonna use one of these lenses to make a bodacious landscape and it's going to challenge the common presumptions about focal lengths and apertures needed for that kind of work.

I've also been very open in acknowledging the attractiveness of a 600mm or 800mm lens priced well below a kilobuck. A lot of novice wildlife and bird photographers will be intrigued. Very few experienced photographers in either genre are going to be interested.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2020 at 04:52 UTC
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)
In reply to:

StanyBuyle: I downloaded the image 14/41 (heron) in jpeg.
At 100%, it's simply unsharp.
Looking to the EXIF: 1/50 sec, f/11, ISO 100, -0.67 EV ...
Iso 100, so there was clearly enough light.
In that case, no wildlife photographer would use an 800mm lens at 1/50 sec...
At the other hand, if taken handheld, it shows the effectiveness of the stabilization

PhotoKhan, my commentary on the Canon f/11 primes is based solely on a desire to help photographers choose and use the tools that will help them make the photos they dream of making. Full stop.

If one objectively pursues the question, for what genre of photography would I want a 600mm or 800mm lens, I would suggest wildlife and bird photography would be the most common responses. As someone who's been doing that kind of photography a few years, I've developed a perspective. You and others may agree or disagree and that is awesome. We're not required to emulate some mythical central truth. That said, when I talk about the limited usefulness of an f/11 optic at sunrise or sunset in twilight conditions, I'm speaking from experience. I've been there. My f/5.6 500mm keeps me waiting 10-15 minutes longer than an f/4 lens in morning twilight until I'm able to shoot. An f/11 lens would keep me waiting another 30-45 minutes. That's not opinion. It's just a fact.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2020 at 04:38 UTC
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)
In reply to:

StanyBuyle: I downloaded the image 14/41 (heron) in jpeg.
At 100%, it's simply unsharp.
Looking to the EXIF: 1/50 sec, f/11, ISO 100, -0.67 EV ...
Iso 100, so there was clearly enough light.
In that case, no wildlife photographer would use an 800mm lens at 1/50 sec...
At the other hand, if taken handheld, it shows the effectiveness of the stabilization

Here's a link to a post with a couple of photos made in low light at slow shutter speeds: https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63158781

Last Friday, I had an opportunity to photograph an elk herd at sunrise. There are a couple of keepers I made at 1/60 still being tweaked. Here's another photo from that shoot: https://flic.kr/p/2jujbYe

I know how I shoot and slow shutter speeds in low light, while not the norm, are sometimes necessary at the times of day when animals are active. These f/11 primes will undoubtedly appeal to folks intrigued by the idea of long focal lengths at comparatively affordable pricing. But once hooked on wildlife or bird photography, a person will pretty quickly recognize how useless a fixed f/11 lens is for those genres.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2020 at 13:58 UTC
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)

There are a couple of interesting photos in the gallery. The Space Needle chose up and the freight train come to mind. None are the wildlife, bird or nature photos this focal length range is more commonly used for. Using a lens like this for urban or street photography would turn those genres on their respective heads a bit. Maybe Eggleston will pick one up and make some art.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2020 at 10:55 UTC as 15th comment
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)
In reply to:

ChelseaPhotographer: Some of these look really soft, but a couple are tack sharp, which leads me to believe that the lens itself is good enough. Maybe the people shooting these images don't know how to focus properly? They are probably still doing focus-and-recompose...

Or at midday when most of these photos were made, the heat distortion over the distances between the subject and photographer had a noticeable impact on image quality...which is something a photo gallery for a new lens should show. It's like the significant vignetteing in the first image, the distracting backgrounds in others, or the contrasty light and deep shadows on the subjects in many sample photos. This is what the lens will deliver in the conditions in which it will be used.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2020 at 10:45 UTC
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)

The vignetteing (first image) at f/11 is surprisingly strong. While that should be fixable with the click of a button in Lightroom, I was not expecting to see that.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2020 at 10:35 UTC as 16th comment
On article Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM sample gallery (431 comments in total)
In reply to:

StanyBuyle: I downloaded the image 14/41 (heron) in jpeg.
At 100%, it's simply unsharp.
Looking to the EXIF: 1/50 sec, f/11, ISO 100, -0.67 EV ...
Iso 100, so there was clearly enough light.
In that case, no wildlife photographer would use an 800mm lens at 1/50 sec...
At the other hand, if taken handheld, it shows the effectiveness of the stabilization

Stany, I shoot at 1/50 with an effective focal length of 750mm on occasion with my D500/200-500 at f/5.6. That is about as slow as I'll go in twilight when the elk are grazing. I'm also at ISO 800+.

Under that lighting these Canon f/11 lenses would force me to be at ISO 6400+. At sunrise, that would mean I'd be scrolling through DPR forum posts waiting another 15-20 minutes for the sky to brighten to have enough light to start shooting. At the end of the day, that would mean I and my camera would be in the car driving home when the elk walks by where I had been set up.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2020 at 10:26 UTC
In reply to:

Olrik: Simard has the luck of being where nobody else is. As talented as he is, I'd like to see his work in, say, downtown Milwaukee.

There's no luck involved in her work. She intentionally chooses her locations, hikes her backside off to get to a vantage point of her choice, and applies her creativity to find & make a photo. I've no doubt if she accepted a commission to photograph an urban environment, she'd make a unique and compelling photo of that place.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2020 at 12:16 UTC

There's an old saying in television, "Nobody ever got fired for buying Sony." Sony is the world leader in the manufacturing and sales of professional broadcast quality videocameras. As a thirty-plus year professional in broadcast television and video production - most of that time working with Sony cameras - I can vouch for the quality of the equipment and customer support. Anybody who would say this purchase is a mistake because Sony equipment or support isn't reliable simply has zero idea what they're talking about.

I've got ro believe this was one of the easiest equipment purchase decisions ever made.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 16:14 UTC as 51st comment | 3 replies
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

dacrema: What a great picture! Using a old camera. I always liked the D600/610 sensor, but never was able to capture something this breath taking with them. You have a nice touch sir.

Thank you. Yes, the D610 still delivers great quality images in a low light environment. She doesn't get used, often, but when the opportunity arises, she's up to the task.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 22:53 UTC
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

jpeghorror: This is magical.

Thank you. I had a lot of fun playing with different compositions of the comet and tree. Most were portrait orientation like this. I did a few landscapes including a second tree. But this one stood out from the collection. I think the star near the top of the frame - while subtle - helps to anchor the scene.

Everything just came together in this one.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 13:38 UTC
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Paris: wonderful shot ! well-deserved win

Thank you, Dan.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 13:33 UTC
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

themountainphotographer: Excellent picture.

Thank you.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 13:32 UTC
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

RecklessCoding: Great photo! Love its simplicity and colours.

Thank you. That tree was the reason I drove to this spot to see and photograph the comet. I'd used it before in sunrise photos and imagined a composition with the comet would look good. The color transitions from twilight to daylight with the sun not too far below the horizon were like sprinkles on a sundae.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 13:31 UTC

I love that this camera has a 4.5 fps burst rate and only offers video because, well, digital still cameras kinda have to. It's not pretending to be a sports body or the centerpiece of a filmmaker's kit. It's an entry level full frame stills camera that will come with the FTZ adapter at no extra cost for $1,399 this Christmas.

This camera will be great for travel, portraits, landscapes, street. The dynamic range at base ISO is gonna be great. I'm keeping my D500 for sports & action. This could be a good replacement for the D610. I like where Nikon is going with the Zs. Next, they need to release gen II versions of the 6 and 7, followed by a D6 equivalent Z1.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 05:08 UTC as 253rd comment
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

vbuhay: When I first saw your image, I right away knew it would win. Congrats....

Vic, thank you. I truly appreciate your note and hope you've had an overnight to see and enjoy the comet.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 00:39 UTC
On photo Comet NEOWISE in the Open Challenge challenge (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter Del: I thought it was a great image when I saw it in a Forum. A well deserved winner.

Peter, you're most gracious. Thank you.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 00:37 UTC
In reply to:

Bill Ferris: For perched birds, static or slow moving subjects in bright light, these lenses could be a hit. The price is certainly right for the enthusiast. That's assuming they're pin sharp wide open. (Does it even make sense to use the phrase, wide open, and f/11 in the same sentence?) If you have to close to f/13 or slower for best performance, get ready for the trash bin of history.

Interesting. Clearly, I had missed that little tidbit about being a fixed f/11 on the two primes. I gotta give Canon credit for some original thinking with that approach. I would also assume their optical engineers optimized performance across the field with these lenses. If they're anything except very sharp with minimal aberrations, I'd be surprised.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2020 at 01:48 UTC
Total: 150, showing: 1 – 20
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