teddoman

teddoman

Lives in United States New York, NY, United States
Joined on Nov 20, 2012
About me:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tedchang/

Comments

Total: 399, showing: 1 – 20
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is that the first animated gif I've seen on the news page?

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 18:43 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

teddoman: I agree this is an important issue. There are already a lot of examples of border officials seizing electronic devices, journalists covering events having their equipment seized, etc.

"the D.A. asked the sheriff to confiscate the camera and delete the picture" http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/30/insider/forcing-a-district-attorneys-hand.html

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2016 at 13:20 UTC

"the D.A. asked the sheriff to confiscate the camera and delete the picture" http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/30/insider/forcing-a-district-attorneys-hand.html

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2016 at 13:16 UTC as 3rd comment

For people desperate for battery power, at what point do you just buy 2 phones with standard batteries and switch SIM cards when the first one runs out?

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2016 at 05:58 UTC as 6th comment | 5 replies

* By "digital photography market," we also mean anything that might have caused the consumer point and shoot market of traditional camera manufacturers to implode

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2016 at 12:50 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (181 comments in total)
In reply to:

Fun 4 all: Now only are these tiny sensors getting better, but the processing and software is improving. HDR, Lens Blur, image stitching, are all 'gimmicks' that keep improving at a much faster rate than ILCs. Smartphones have had 4K video and 120 FPS video for a while, but only now are some ILCs adding these features.
The only place smartphones can't compete is longer focal lengths.

I've had this phone for a while and love it by the way.

Would be a lot harder for camera manufacturers because cameras are used by pros for extended shoots. Built in batteries would be a non-starter.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2016 at 01:41 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1599 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thematic: strange praise in these comments and canon forums - every post ends with "even though I won't be buying this camera...."

Why is nobody wanting to purchase it?

Also worth pointing out that a lot of NX owners are video shooters who own a lot of Canon gear. Buying an M5 system out of the blue is a bigger statement of confidence in Canon mirrorless than, say, buying an M5 as an existing owner of Canon glass. I have heard a lot of praise for DPAF but haven't personally tested it against Sony. For shooting people, Sony AF is pretty darn good (and better than the NX1 in video which doesn't use facial recognition in video). I'm not a BIF shooter though so it depends on your use, photo AF may be a different story. Sony does have a lot of shortcomings in photographic design (colors, overheating, menus, cheap touchscreen, consumer APS-C ergonomics) that I am resigned to living with. We'll have to see if EF glass will AF as well as native M glass (Sony A mount glass on a native AF adapter doesn't perform as well E mount glass.)

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2016 at 15:29 UTC
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (181 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sam Bennett: The Pixel may "show better dynamic range than most competitors in bright light" but that doesn't mean the photos look good. In my experience the photos generally look flat, phony, and really awful with skin tones in portraiture. This is an area Apple's processing, while it may technically yield less DR ultimately yields a more pleasant-looking photo. It's a shame, because due to Google's insistence on re-enabling HDR+ even after someone's turned it off means I ended up switching to a different camera app. That said, the Pixel is an excellent phone overall - the best Android phone I've ever used - but for now I prefer the iPhone 7 Plus as a photographer.

Some users have complained about Sony skin tones, and now there are picture profiles to improve Sony color (and in particular skin tones). Are you unhappy with Pixel's SOOC colors or unhappy with the colors even after trying to process them? Maybe someone needs to develop a color profile that can be applied to HDR+ photos for more pleasing skin tones.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2016 at 15:06 UTC
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (181 comments in total)
In reply to:

Fun 4 all: Now only are these tiny sensors getting better, but the processing and software is improving. HDR, Lens Blur, image stitching, are all 'gimmicks' that keep improving at a much faster rate than ILCs. Smartphones have had 4K video and 120 FPS video for a while, but only now are some ILCs adding these features.
The only place smartphones can't compete is longer focal lengths.

I've had this phone for a while and love it by the way.

Built in battery and no microSD are not going anywhere anytime soon. No microSD allows manufacturers to charge a big storage premium (and push people into their cloud architecture). And built in batteries force more frequent camera turnover. A conspiracist might even wonder if OS upgrades might include intentional reductions in battery life to force users to upgrade.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2016 at 12:29 UTC
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (181 comments in total)
In reply to:

teddoman: Can you use all the features, esp the HDR+ mode that is highly touted in the review, while shooting using a third party RAW app?

oh right, sorry bad question. I guess I should be asking if the images underlying the HDR+ mode can be saved in RAW. But then I guess you'd have to manually do the HDR. Might be too much trouble for casual cell photos.

That puts you in a bit of a tough spot, RAW capture or in camera HDR+ jpegs but you can't do both.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 16:05 UTC
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (181 comments in total)

Can you use all the features, esp the HDR+ mode that is highly touted in the review, while shooting using a third party RAW app?

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 15:29 UTC as 38th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

ottonis: Don't want to be the elephant in the room here, but I think we shouldn't expect too much from Nokia, or from any other compay offering "cameraphones".
Here's the reason:
In contrast to digital cameras that you can nowadays easily use for more than 5-10 years, smartphones get technically obsolete after 2-3 years:
a) most companies provide software/system updates for not longer than 2 years (at best), and
b) most smartphones get notably slower and slower (=more laggy, less operational)over time.
That being said: smartphones are sort of disposable items, where the camera module of the best high-end smartphones costs 20-30 USD (sensor + circuit board + lens + OIS). Nobody is going to put a 200 USD-sensor into a smartphone that will become obsolete after 2-3 years! Such a phone would easily cost 1500 USD in total. So it would be niche product for the richest of the rich. That's why I believe that we should not expect too much in terms of large sensor tech in upcoming phones.

Yes realistically, the economics of the industry suggest manufacturers need you to buy a new phone frequently. So it doesn't make sense to design for longevity. That said, the modular phone concept has promise if they supported modular camera modules (sensor and lens). You could buy the phone with a "kit" camera but then replace it with a 1" sensor and lens. If a manufacturer committed to a certain architecture and size for the camera module, this seems like the only way to separate the cell camera from the phone OS and hardware itself. A 1" sensor will age much better than the rest of the camera, as long as OS updates support the camera modules. I know there are modular phone concepts out there, but I don't think anyone has thought about making the entire camera unit modular where you could insert it like a battery and still have a flat cell phone profile (instead of a bulky Sony QX type bolt on lens)

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 15:00 UTC

I'd really consider a photography-oriented Android Nokia made in the mold of the 808 or 1020 with a large sensor, but I think I'm going to sit this one out until I see what their security update track record looks like. Phones are insecure enough as it is, much less with third party manufacturers sitting on known exploits and not deploying security updates. I wish one of these third party manufacturers would just run pair a great camera with stock android and instant security updates. They'd get my money at least.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2016 at 02:01 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I think the big problem with this is that good encryption isn't computationally cheap enough for the relatively slow ARM32 processors used in most cameras. Using CHDK, ML, or OpenMemories, one could probably put code into a camera to do this, but it would almost certainly be as a slow in-camera postprocessing step. It would be pretty hard to convince companies to add encryption hardware....

Actually, a lot of Flash memory cards also have ARM32 cores that could be programmed to do it... but then the camera probably wouldn't be able to review the files once written.

It's not immediately intuitive to me that you could encrypt a file using the public key where the private key is not involved and yet the private key is needed to decrypt it. Can someone confirm this is how public key encryption actually works and that the private key isn't needed during the encryption phase? If so, almost seems like a perfect solution.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 15:06 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tilted Plane: This lens is super sharp once you stop down a couple stops, equal to the fantastic Sony 28 f/2. But beware, the autofocus (on an A7r) is horrific. Basically unusable for many situations. If you don't need the short working distance (which I do, for copy work), and you have the money (which I don't), consider the Sony 90mm macro instead.

Is there any reason these legacy design macro lenses wouldn't get the same benefit of IBIS as other lenses?

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 14:08 UTC
In reply to:

Suntan: Good in theory, horrible in use. Besides the overhead of encryption and its negative impact on burst modes, do you want to have to input a pin number to "unlock" your camera everytime you want to take a picture? Or would you be fine with only having to enter a pin when you want to review a taken picture?

Not to mention the negative impact on workflow. Who wants to run all their pictures through a weakly supported program, made by their camera manufacturer, to "decrypt" their images before opening them in pshop?

Not 90% of the time, but I think a photojournalist traveling in regions where the law does not protect their rights might want an option to activate a high security password protected mode.

Realistically I imagine any manufacturer implementing a passphrase and encryption feature might do it first on a model targeted to photojournalists and put a touchscreen on it. And while the industry isn't fully there yet, some manufacturers are already 100% touchscreen, and for the others, it does seem like a lot of recent models have been getting touchscreens. So this objection has a half-life of maybe 5 more years at best. Unless you're a Fuji photojournalist :)

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 14:01 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tilted Plane: This lens is super sharp once you stop down a couple stops, equal to the fantastic Sony 28 f/2. But beware, the autofocus (on an A7r) is horrific. Basically unusable for many situations. If you don't need the short working distance (which I do, for copy work), and you have the money (which I don't), consider the Sony 90mm macro instead.

"I don't understand why they use such a crappy AF motor"

Because $500?

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 13:43 UTC
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: What a load of idiotic crap. Clearly those writing on here have never been in a situation where someone extremely ugly, menacing and heavily armed orders you to hand over your equipment. Do you really want to accept the consequences of protecting a few images on a memory card? Speaking from personal experience, I promise you there are situations where you do exactly as you are told and you will give up whatever you are asked for.

Freedom of the Press Foundation has been busy on encryption, including supporting SecureDrop app to enable secure leaks to journalists (after so many leakers have been prosecuted)

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 21:29 UTC
In reply to:

Mister Joseph: Just swallow the SD card lol

Camera manufacturers could hold a CF card swallowing contest at Coney Island next to the Nathan's hot dog eating contest

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 19:22 UTC
In reply to:

ewelch: Here's an idea. The encryption doesn't scramble photos, it just turns them into cute cat pictures! That way when the Gestapo, er Homeland Security, border security, [insert oppressive government jerks] security ask to see what's on your camera, they say, "Aw, cute!" rather than, "Come with me."

Reminds me of some applications I used years ago. There was a "boss" button that would instantly show a screen with an Excel spreadsheet or something.

Best way to implement a gestapo feature is to allow the photographer to keep a harmless set of photos on the camera. Input the real password and you get the real photos. Input the gestapo password and you get whatever fake pics the photographer wants them to see. If the same cat pics show up on every camera, the trick might get discovered :)

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 16:38 UTC
Total: 399, showing: 1 – 20
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