Frank_BR

Lives in Brazil Campinas/SP, Brazil
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Jan 20, 2005

Comments

Total: 483, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Jaythomasni: This is because terrorists achieved technique to insert bombs with the same density and physical footprint of the battery...it wont be captured in the screening and will look like li Battery

Catalyst Shift,
I thought that when I was talking about fuselage, it was clear that I was referring to the fuselage walls. Thanks for the clarification.

About the failed terrorist attack on the flight from Somalia, you can be sure that a disaster didn't happen by pure luck. If the explosion had hit a fuselage beam, the result would be catastrophic, and no one would be questioning the need to take extreme care of flights coming from socially failed countries that are nests of terrorists.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 19:56 UTC

Just to refresh the memory of those who have forgotten the near-disaster of a year ago:
http://gizmodo.com/terrorist-on-flight-from-somalia-allegedly-hid-bomb-in-1757833127

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 17:01 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Jaythomasni: This is because terrorists achieved technique to insert bombs with the same density and physical footprint of the battery...it wont be captured in the screening and will look like li Battery

Hand luggage is stored near the fuselage of the airplane. In addition, it can be manipulated by the passenger, who may be a potential terrorist. A small explosive charge in the cabin can easily open a hole in the fuselage and crash the plane, or kill nearby passengers. The same explosion in the cargo compartment is much less likely to knock the plane down. Is this so difficult to understand?

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 16:46 UTC

MF where? MF was the format derived from the 120 and 220 films, which had a nominal width of 6 cm (56mm or 2 1/4 inch to be exact). To be MF at least one dimension must be equal to 56mm. True MF formats were 6x4.5, 6x6, 6x7, 6x9, etc.

3.3 x 4.4 cm is not MF! It is fake MF. It is a digital age fraud. Maybe it should be called e-FF (enhanced FF) or so. Never MF!

PS1: Excellent article, one of the best I've read in the last 3.3 or 4.4 years. Congrats!
PS2: Wake me when Fuji makes a true MF camera ... zzzzzzz ...

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2017 at 22:38 UTC as 56th comment | 2 replies
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (887 comments in total)
In reply to:

MediaArchivist: I rarely use the viewfinder, I use the LCD for almost all my shots. So the debate is kind of pointless for me :)

Think the LCD as an EVF without ocular lens.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 21:42 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (887 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Your preference for the type of viewfinder can say about you more than you think. If you prefer the OVF, you are a voyeur who is more interested in watching than in shooting the world. You are the kind of person who seeks more of a "pleasant experience" than capturing a good photographic image. On the other hand, if you prefer EVF, it means that you have the correct attitude of a real photographer. For you the EVF is just an instrument to adjust the camera and to show as accurately as possible how the final image will be.

EVF always!

Don't shoot the messenger, entoman! To understand what I meant, watch the classic Hitchcock Rear Window. Maybe the movie should be called Optical Viewfinder. :) The voyeur photographer was more interested in looking at people through the lens of the camera than in photographing them.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 21:36 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (887 comments in total)

Your preference for the type of viewfinder can say about you more than you think. If you prefer the OVF, you are a voyeur who is more interested in watching than in shooting the world. You are the kind of person who seeks more of a "pleasant experience" than capturing a good photographic image. On the other hand, if you prefer EVF, it means that you have the correct attitude of a real photographer. For you the EVF is just an instrument to adjust the camera and to show as accurately as possible how the final image will be.

EVF always!

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 19:40 UTC as 96th comment | 7 replies

Do not be so impressed. The article numbers only reflect that 2016 was an atypical year. Who does not remember the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco? In March Samsung starts mass production of the Galaxy S8 and things return to normal.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 18:45 UTC as 9th comment | 6 replies

OK, I understood that the article is more about emotion than information. But if the goal was to impress the reader, an exponential scale would be even better.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 11:58 UTC as 6th comment

It is not a fake. Its is a clone!

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2016 at 19:54 UTC as 9th comment
In reply to:

Snapper2013: The Leica Summilux-SL 50mm f/1.4 ASPH, would make a great stocking stuffer!

Hurry up, it's "on sale" !

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 19:09 UTC

In addition of the seismograph, maybe Phase One should have included an electrocardiograph to detect the photographer's heart racing after he knows the price of the camera...

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2016 at 00:25 UTC as 22nd comment

Just wondering why the image stabilization does not work during electronic shutter exposure. Possibly the explanation is the low capability of the digital processor to perform both operations simultaneously.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 19:02 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II (441 comments in total)

Sony's revenge. The A99 II is a camera with a "dead" mount that "kills" the competition (Canon 5D Mkr IV, Nikon D810 and Pentax K1).

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 13:14 UTC as 17th comment
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1627 comments in total)

Video 4k requires a lot of processing and energy. Dissipating the heat generated by the electronic circuits can be a problem in a camera with a small body. Canon is not an electronics company like Sony and Panasonic, which own the leading electronic technology and can now routinely incorporate video 4k in their cameras. Most likely, the Canon M5 doesn't have video 4k because it would produce pneumo... err... overheating.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2016 at 12:44 UTC as 216th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Frank_BR: What a lens! It has a solid metal construction (594 g), is much faster (F2.4) than a traditional F2.8 portrait lens and the 108mm length is very imposing. The price of $1400 is a bargain for a Zeiss lens built according to the best technology from 40 years ago, when MF lenses were preferred by the professionals. Last but not least, this is a historical lens: it is the first lens Loxia 85mm built in the world. It probably will command a huge price for collectors in the second half of this century.

The rumors are that the next Loxia lens will be a Sonnar 135mm with fast F3.5 aperture (faster than the classic Sonnar 135mm F4 from before the war), weight 1127 g, length with cap 153 mm, and a modest price (for a Zeiss) of $2,499. The price includes an all-metal 324 g tripod collar.

In MF golden period there were many lenses for portraiture with focal length 80 ~ 100mm and aperture F2.8. Some most known examples:

Carl Zeiss Sonnar 85mm F2.8
Rokkor 85mm F2.8
Elmarit-R 90mm F2.8
Tele Elmarit-M 90mm F2.8
Canon FD 100mm F2.8
EBC Fujinon 100mm F2.8
Hexanon 100mm F2.8
Pentax 100mm F2.8 M
Topcor RE 100mm F2.8
Zuiko 100mm F2.8
etc.

It should also be mentioned that 80mm F2.8 was the normal lenses for medium format cameras of that time. Today many people use these lenses adapted to FF.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 15:12 UTC

What a lens! It has a solid metal construction (594 g), is much faster (F2.4) than a traditional F2.8 portrait lens and the 108mm length is very imposing. The price of $1400 is a bargain for a Zeiss lens built according to the best technology from 40 years ago, when MF lenses were preferred by the professionals. Last but not least, this is a historical lens: it is the first lens Loxia 85mm built in the world. It probably will command a huge price for collectors in the second half of this century.

The rumors are that the next Loxia lens will be a Sonnar 135mm with fast F3.5 aperture (faster than the classic Sonnar 135mm F4 from before the war), weight 1127 g, length with cap 153 mm, and a modest price (for a Zeiss) of $2,499. The price includes an all-metal 324 g tripod collar.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 12:47 UTC as 10th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

Frank_BR: A manual-focus lens from Tokina? Hmmm ... this is the territory of Samyang, which has just launched a 20mm F1.8 lens, which is faster (and probably cheaper, too) than this Tokina. I feel that Tokina is dreaming of the past when it was a competitive lens company.

brendon1000,
The question is not whether Tokina is technically better or worse than Samyang. Forty years ago Tokina was a big name in lenses, but today is a shadow of what it was. No doubt Tokina made/makes good lenses, but it seems that has lost its competitiveness.

On the sample variation of Samyang lenses, this seems to be mostly a thing of the past. Indeed, look at the feedbacks of Rokinon, aka Samyang 14mm F2.8 in BH and note that users are very satisfied: in 251 reviews, 226 were 4 or 5 stars.

Samyang is striving to master the AF technology, which is dominated by Japanese companies lenses since the early 1980s. When I see a company like Samyang starting to produce AF lenses, I see a company that is looking forward.

On the other hand, when I see a Japanese company as Tokina, which already holds the AF technology, but returning to the old technology of MF lenses, what I see is a company in decline trying to revive a golden past.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 12:50 UTC

A manual-focus lens from Tokina? Hmmm ... this is the territory of Samyang, which has just launched a 20mm F1.8 lens, which is faster (and probably cheaper, too) than this Tokina. I feel that Tokina is dreaming of the past when it was a competitive lens company.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 00:09 UTC as 12th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Great work by Roger Cicala, as always.

The difficulties experienced by Roger Cicala to dismantle the Canon 5D Mark IV came basically from not having access to the service manual of the camera. Manufacturers are increasingly reluctant to provide information and parts for maintenance by anyone other than authorized centers. The consumer is treated like a king when he/she spends his/her hard-earned money on a product. Sadly, immediately after the purchase manufacturers start to consider the consumer as an idiot who must be away from any maintenance, however simple it may be. In fact, the maintenance of a digital camera is not so complicated if you have the right information and right parts.

Disassembling a camera without breaking things in the process is not trivial as it seems to a casual observer. Just read the article by Roger Cicala to understand, for example, that the plastic parts have a lot of intelocking latches that easily break if the repairman uses force incorrectly. The orderly disassembly without destroying the camera can be tricky without a service manual.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2016 at 11:11 UTC
Total: 483, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »