Frank_BR

Lives in Brazil Campinas/SP, Brazil
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Jan 20, 2005

Comments

Total: 470, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II (432 comments in total)

Sony's revenge. The A99 II is a camera with a "dead" mount that "kills" the competition (Canon 5D Mkr IV, Nikon D810 and Pentax K1).

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 13:14 UTC as 9th comment | 1 reply

Video 4k requires a lot of processing and energy. Dissipating the heat generated by the electronic circuits can be a problem in a camera with a small body. Canon is not an electronics company like Sony and Panasonic, which own the leading electronic technology and can now routinely incorporate video 4k in their cameras. Most likely, the Canon M5 doesn't have video 4k because it would produce pneumo... err... overheating.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2016 at 12:44 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Frank_BR: What a lens! It has a solid metal construction (594 g), is much faster (F2.4) than a traditional F2.8 portrait lens and the 108mm length is very imposing. The price of $1400 is a bargain for a Zeiss lens built according to the best technology from 40 years ago, when MF lenses were preferred by the professionals. Last but not least, this is a historical lens: it is the first lens Loxia 85mm built in the world. It probably will command a huge price for collectors in the second half of this century.

The rumors are that the next Loxia lens will be a Sonnar 135mm with fast F3.5 aperture (faster than the classic Sonnar 135mm F4 from before the war), weight 1127 g, length with cap 153 mm, and a modest price (for a Zeiss) of $2,499. The price includes an all-metal 324 g tripod collar.

In MF golden period there were many lenses for portraiture with focal length 80 ~ 100mm and aperture F2.8. Some most known examples:

Carl Zeiss Sonnar 85mm F2.8
Rokkor 85mm F2.8
Elmarit-R 90mm F2.8
Tele Elmarit-M 90mm F2.8
Canon FD 100mm F2.8
EBC Fujinon 100mm F2.8
Hexanon 100mm F2.8
Pentax 100mm F2.8 M
Topcor RE 100mm F2.8
Zuiko 100mm F2.8
etc.

It should also be mentioned that 80mm F2.8 was the normal lenses for medium format cameras of that time. Today many people use these lenses adapted to FF.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 15:12 UTC

What a lens! It has a solid metal construction (594 g), is much faster (F2.4) than a traditional F2.8 portrait lens and the 108mm length is very imposing. The price of $1400 is a bargain for a Zeiss lens built according to the best technology from 40 years ago, when MF lenses were preferred by the professionals. Last but not least, this is a historical lens: it is the first lens Loxia 85mm built in the world. It probably will command a huge price for collectors in the second half of this century.

The rumors are that the next Loxia lens will be a Sonnar 135mm with fast F3.5 aperture (faster than the classic Sonnar 135mm F4 from before the war), weight 1127 g, length with cap 153 mm, and a modest price (for a Zeiss) of $2,499. The price includes an all-metal 324 g tripod collar.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 12:47 UTC as 10th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

Frank_BR: A manual-focus lens from Tokina? Hmmm ... this is the territory of Samyang, which has just launched a 20mm F1.8 lens, which is faster (and probably cheaper, too) than this Tokina. I feel that Tokina is dreaming of the past when it was a competitive lens company.

brendon1000,
The question is not whether Tokina is technically better or worse than Samyang. Forty years ago Tokina was a big name in lenses, but today is a shadow of what it was. No doubt Tokina made/makes good lenses, but it seems that has lost its competitiveness.

On the sample variation of Samyang lenses, this seems to be mostly a thing of the past. Indeed, look at the feedbacks of Rokinon, aka Samyang 14mm F2.8 in BH and note that users are very satisfied: in 251 reviews, 226 were 4 or 5 stars.

Samyang is striving to master the AF technology, which is dominated by Japanese companies lenses since the early 1980s. When I see a company like Samyang starting to produce AF lenses, I see a company that is looking forward.

On the other hand, when I see a Japanese company as Tokina, which already holds the AF technology, but returning to the old technology of MF lenses, what I see is a company in decline trying to revive a golden past.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 12:50 UTC

A manual-focus lens from Tokina? Hmmm ... this is the territory of Samyang, which has just launched a 20mm F1.8 lens, which is faster (and probably cheaper, too) than this Tokina. I feel that Tokina is dreaming of the past when it was a competitive lens company.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 00:09 UTC as 8th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Great work by Roger Cicala, as always.

The difficulties experienced by Roger Cicala to dismantle the Canon 5D Mark IV came basically from not having access to the service manual of the camera. Manufacturers are increasingly reluctant to provide information and parts for maintenance by anyone other than authorized centers. The consumer is treated like a king when he/she spends his/her hard-earned money on a product. Sadly, immediately after the purchase manufacturers start to consider the consumer as an idiot who must be away from any maintenance, however simple it may be. In fact, the maintenance of a digital camera is not so complicated if you have the right information and right parts.

Disassembling a camera without breaking things in the process is not trivial as it seems to a casual observer. Just read the article by Roger Cicala to understand, for example, that the plastic parts have a lot of intelocking latches that easily break if the repairman uses force incorrectly. The orderly disassembly without destroying the camera can be tricky without a service manual.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2016 at 11:11 UTC

Great work by Roger Cicala, as always.

The difficulties experienced by Roger Cicala to dismantle the Canon 5D Mark IV came basically from not having access to the service manual of the camera. Manufacturers are increasingly reluctant to provide information and parts for maintenance by anyone other than authorized centers. The consumer is treated like a king when he/she spends his/her hard-earned money on a product. Sadly, immediately after the purchase manufacturers start to consider the consumer as an idiot who must be away from any maintenance, however simple it may be. In fact, the maintenance of a digital camera is not so complicated if you have the right information and right parts.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2016 at 22:56 UTC as 2nd comment | 3 replies

"With the removal of the headphone jack, the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus have been made fully water resistant"

In fact, resistance to water has nothing to do with the presence or absence of the 3.5mm phone jack. It is really trivial to construct a sealed 3.5mm phone jack. With a sealed phone jack the water enters the connector hole but does not reach the electronic circuits, which is what matters.

Here is an example of a sealed 3.5 phone jack:
https://www.altex.com/Chassis-or-PC-Board-Mounted-35mm-Stereo-Jack-502JB-P154660.aspx

This connector costs only $0.62 each for quantities between 499 and 20,000 units. For millions of units, such as for the production of the iPhone 7, the price should be only a few cents of a dollar.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 00:57 UTC as 347th comment | 2 replies
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (947 comments in total)
In reply to:

marike6: Removing the mini-jack feels like fixing something that isn't broken. But iFans are fiercely loyal, if Apple removed the LCD, defenders would say "but they are including a Lightning-to-HDMI cable in the box you can plug into your laptop should you need to". ;-)

For people who enjoy shooting with their phones, the camera could be interesting.

Apple doesn't like output connectors. Apple likes input$ :-)

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 15:53 UTC
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (947 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Apple calls the 56mm lens in the iPhone 7 as a tele-lens. On the other hand, Zeiss calls its Otus 55mm as the "the best standard lens in the world". Is Otus 55mm a tele or a standard lens? I'm so confused...

One negative effect of the "tele-lens definition" by Apple is that people are starting to forget what a "normal" lens is. A "normal" or "standard" lens is not the photographer's favorite lens. If so, as I like to use a 16mm fisheye, a 28mm lens would be a telephoto and a 50 mm a super telephoto lens to me!. This way of thinking is absurd, of course.

The most accepted definition of a normal lens is the one whose focal length is approximately equal to the format diagonal. Thus, for the 35mm format, normal lenses are those with focal lengths around 43mm. In practice this means lenses from 40 to 58mm. Thus, the iPhone's 56mm (equivalent!) should be called a normal lens, not a tele-lens.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 15:13 UTC
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (947 comments in total)

Apple calls the 56mm lens in the iPhone 7 as a tele-lens. On the other hand, Zeiss calls its Otus 55mm as the "the best standard lens in the world". Is Otus 55mm a tele or a standard lens? I'm so confused...

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 13:08 UTC as 27th comment | 7 replies
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (947 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: Agreeing that 56mm (135 equivelant) is narrower than 28mm (ditto), it's hardly "Tele"! It's not even "Portrait". Indeed, I seem to remember that the F2.0 Helios lens that came attached as standard with my original Zenit B, was 57mm (actual).

More interesting would have been a pair of identical "28mm" cameras at both ends of one of the long sides, to enable you to take landscape format, 3D photos.

Brian

I also have a Helios F2 lens!

Cheers!

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 01:02 UTC
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (947 comments in total)

"Next to the standard 28mm module is a tele-56mm lens with its own 12MP sensor"

Well, 56mm is the focal length of a NORMAL lens, not a tele-lens!
Apple wasn't happy to capture a significant part of the photographic market. Now Apple is subverting the photographic concepts, too.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 00:51 UTC as 44th comment | 2 replies

All these cine lenses certainly have thick metal barrels. Indeed, the lighter lens in the group, the 24mm T1.5, weighs 1135 g, despite not having any AF or IS mechanism. People who like to complain that modern photographic lenses, even those for professional use, employ a lot of plastic in its construction, should now know why now.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2016 at 18:09 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply

WARNING: Shooting Nikon is hazardous to your health!

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2016 at 02:23 UTC as 48th comment
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)

"The final image was made up of approximately. 700 hi-res images and ended up at 53 billion pixels in size."
------------------------------------------------------

The Nikon D810 is a 36 Mpixel camera, so 700 images stitched together produce a final image of about 25, not 53 billion pixels! Some detail is missing in this story...

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 22:02 UTC as 28th comment | 2 replies
On article Sony announces FE 50mm F1.4 ZA prime lens (293 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank_BR: This emphasis of the lens manufacturers in launching extremely expensive lenses will end up killing the the market for photographic enthusiasts. As happened in the past with the market for high-fidelity audio.

Lens manufacturers urgently need to (re) learn how to make high-performance lenses but affordable to most enthusiasts. Otherwise, people will soon get tired of spending fortunes with photographic equipment.

Magnar W,
Probably $1500 for a fixed focal length lens is acceptable for a well-paid professional. However, it seems clear to me that Sony is charging too much for its most interesting lenses. Who will keep Sony alive is the enthusiast, not the professional. What Sony needs to do is to widen the market for full-frame cameras, not scare away the millions of enthusiasts who have experienced the taste of photography with Sony NEX cameras.

It's hard to accept that Sony charges $1500 for a 50mm F1.4 lens when a camera like the Sony RX-10 III, which is a complete photographic solution, costs the same amount. Before someone says I'm comparing apple to orange, I must say that the lens of the RX10 III is optically and mechanically much more complex, and probably more expensive to produce than this FE 50mm F1.4 ZA. And, of course, in addition to the lens, the RX10 III has a body which is extremely elaborate and expensive to produce.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2016 at 01:42 UTC
On article Sony announces FE 50mm F1.4 ZA prime lens (293 comments in total)

This emphasis of the lens manufacturers in launching extremely expensive lenses will end up killing the the market for photographic enthusiasts. As happened in the past with the market for high-fidelity audio.

Lens manufacturers urgently need to (re) learn how to make high-performance lenses but affordable to most enthusiasts. Otherwise, people will soon get tired of spending fortunes with photographic equipment.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 13:08 UTC as 7th comment | 8 replies

How "Mirrorless is the future" if there are tons of excellent mirrorless cameras for ALL formats in the market today? The future for mirrorless has arrived and it is bright. In contrast, it is hard to imagine what is the future of DSLR cameras. Of course Bengston would not say that the days of the DSLR concept are numbered because Hasselblad still produces DSLR cameras.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 15:46 UTC as 74th comment
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