Impulses

Lives in Puerto Rico Puerto Rico
Works as a student
Joined on Apr 7, 2013

Comments

Total: 2408, showing: 141 – 160
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In reply to:

Hellstrom: The lack of progress in SSD capacities / pricing is disappointing. Year after year goes by, and the specs are about the same, with the price either flat or sometimes going UP. Even HDDs only increase by 20% every two years and get slower due to SMR. We're in a "Storage Dark Age", unlike the 1990s when it was doubling every year or two, AND getting faster, AND getting cheaper

FWIW, SATA SSD and NAND pricing has been stuck in place worse than HDD pricing was at the time of the flood that killed supply back in 2011 (and that was big news for a long time); only there's no natural disaster involved now AFAIK, just the memory market going back to it's more volatile roots rather than steady progress it had achieved for the last 6+ years before that.

2008-2015 did see steady progress in overall SSD/NAND pricing IMO, I bought like 4 drives in that span and each one was a better value than the last. I can't say I'd get a whole lot more for my money today vs the last two I bought in 2015 tho, demand shot up and it screwed with flash pricing across the board.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 14:41 UTC
In reply to:

Hellstrom: The lack of progress in SSD capacities / pricing is disappointing. Year after year goes by, and the specs are about the same, with the price either flat or sometimes going UP. Even HDDs only increase by 20% every two years and get slower due to SMR. We're in a "Storage Dark Age", unlike the 1990s when it was doubling every year or two, AND getting faster, AND getting cheaper

" I can get a somewhat larger M.2 NVMe drive "

That should've been followed by "for the same money", obviously there's larger drives - no need to point that out.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 14:28 UTC
In reply to:

Hellstrom: The lack of progress in SSD capacities / pricing is disappointing. Year after year goes by, and the specs are about the same, with the price either flat or sometimes going UP. Even HDDs only increase by 20% every two years and get slower due to SMR. We're in a "Storage Dark Age", unlike the 1990s when it was doubling every year or two, AND getting faster, AND getting cheaper

I can get a somewhat larger M.2 NVMe drive now than two years ago, e.g. 500GB 960 EVO for $230 instead of the 256GB SM951 I bought around the time of Skylake's launch... But again, that's because those drives started off with a hefty premium attached. I CAN'T get a larger SATA drive now for the same money than what I bought TWO years ago. Paid just over $300 for 2x 1TB 850 EVOs then and they're still going for the same darn price.

I'm obviously alluding to consumer gear here for the most part, 60TB drives and $1,000 NVMe drives are well outside the scope of that and frankly a little irrelevant to the masses complaining about SSD pricing in general. The stuff THEY are buying and the stuff going into most OEM systems has been stuck in a rut because of high demand (with phones and dozens of other markets vying for a tight NAND supply). If you look outside your enthusiast/high end bubble you'll understand what's being talked about.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 14:25 UTC
In reply to:

Hellstrom: The lack of progress in SSD capacities / pricing is disappointing. Year after year goes by, and the specs are about the same, with the price either flat or sometimes going UP. Even HDDs only increase by 20% every two years and get slower due to SMR. We're in a "Storage Dark Age", unlike the 1990s when it was doubling every year or two, AND getting faster, AND getting cheaper

Like I said, NVMe drive pricing has come down because those drives started off with a pretty hefty premium when they first started becoming available two years ago (FWIW I bought an OEM SM951 when these weren't even in most people's radar, and for the most part NVMe is still kind of a high end niche)... If you look beyond that and assess the overall market, prices HAVE stagnated.

I only said capacities stagnated a little and it was largely as a result of the pricing, you're bringing up a lot of high end/niche examples which aren't really relevant to the mass market complaining about SSD pricing... Those products have gotten cheaper because they were exorbitantly priced to begin with, your average SATA SSD has basically been in a rut pricing wise for couple years tho.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 14:20 UTC
In reply to:

Hellstrom: The lack of progress in SSD capacities / pricing is disappointing. Year after year goes by, and the specs are about the same, with the price either flat or sometimes going UP. Even HDDs only increase by 20% every two years and get slower due to SMR. We're in a "Storage Dark Age", unlike the 1990s when it was doubling every year or two, AND getting faster, AND getting cheaper

Actually prices did plateu pretty hard over the last two years due to high NAND demand across the industry, we'd been seeing a steady yearly decrease until then tho...

Capacity did kinda stagnate a little (we already had 2TB two years ago) but it's tied back to high demand and the prices not budging lately, specially at the bottom end (SATA drives and bare NAND pricing, NVMe drives got cheaper because they started off with a pretty huge premium).

To wit, Samsung SM951 or 950/960 Pro m.2 drives got somewhat cheaper over the last two years, but the 1-2 TB 850 EVO drives literally cost the same today as when I bought a couple two years ago.

Until the NAND supply catches up current pricing will probably stick...

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 12:49 UTC
In reply to:

Tommygun45: Everyone is missing the point of what this drive is for. If anyone edits video and uses Adobe Premier Pro, and has a MacBook Pro, like lots of people, you are stuck with one drive. Premier Pro performs infinitely better if you can use at least one more drive as a scratch disk to manage the cache. Editing 4k off my Phantom 4 Pro is almost impossible on my brand new $3000 loaded MBP. But with this attached, it would be a breeze. I had the same bottlenecks on my loaded desktop and after installing two SSDs in addition to my primary Samsung m.2 drive the thing absolutely rips apart 4k video now, from my a6500 and Phantom 4 Pro. Anyone wondering how this works should watch this video because it has made my life dramatically better.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7zI7MYSY_0&t=198s

Using the internal laptop SSD for scratch (regardless of it also housing the OS) might work better, and an external like the T5 for project files... That is assuming the internal drive is an NVMe with much higher IOPS (as has been the case for MBPs for a while). From a practical standpoint it makes more sense too since the external will likely be larger (either now or in the future as they get cheaper).

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 02:46 UTC
In reply to:

Ian: How is this version of Camera different than the app for the Nexus phones? I had HDR+ on my Nexus 5 and now my 6P as well (v.4.3.016.14754696).

Heh I upgraded from a Nexus 5 too (still functional, now being used as quasi house remote for smart house automation stuff)...

AFAIK that's the biggest improvement to HDR+ on the Pixel, the capture really is just about instant (at least for like ten frames then it starts slowing down and/or not HDR'ing them IIRC) and even the processing afterwards often happens before I've tapped to review the photo... It's silly quick.

I'm sure the N5 is the slowest of all but I've seen HDR+ in action side by side on my in-law's N6P as well. I imagine the sheer speed and increased number is frame grabs made possible by it helps the algorithm with avoiding some blur or further lowering noise, but the speed is the biggest improvement in use IMO...

Like I said, I dunno how much of that is down to hardware, software, or a mix of both... Probably why you'll see a mix of results when it's ported to other phones (specially from 2016 and before).

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 20:39 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: SSDs are still costing 6-12 times as much per GB as spinning drives. I was hoping this would have come down by now but it seems to have leveled off.

Still using an SSD as an OS/app/catalog drive and a 4TB spinning as a data drive.

I'm using even more of a mix, with a 256GB m.2/NVMe SSD for OS/apps/catalog, 2x 1TB SATA SSD for most things I use frequently and/or recent content, and then HDDs for the rest. I too would've wished the cost would've dropped by now so I could start picking up 2TB drives, my 1TB drives essentially cost the same as when I bought them 2 years ago!

The demand for NAND across the industry has made flash storage prices as stagnant as the 2011 floods did for HDDs, up until now you'd see some pretty tangible drops every 1-2 years... On my desktop(s) I went from 80GB (X25-M G2) to 128GB (Sam. 830) to 2x128GB (830) to 1TB (850 EVO) to 256GB NVMe (SM951) and never paid much more than $300 for any single drive, sometimes less...

Yet as of today the same kind of $ buys me the same exact thing as what I've had for a couple years now, meh. First world problems. :)

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 20:25 UTC
In reply to:

Robert Schroeder: As I've read elsewhere, the T5 SSDs are built from mSATA units—seems to be a lot of new old stock lying around at Samsung that needs to be turned into revenue somehow. That said, I have yet to see a naked 2TB mSATA, so I'm not 100% sure the information is correct.

Who cares anyway? There's nothing wrong with using mSATA/SATA and a USB bridge chip, that's how the vast majority of portable HDD and SSD are made... Only reason not to do it that way is if you somehow wanted an even smaller drive OR a much faster one by way of PCI-E/NVMe, but the latter would be kind of overkill and would be bottlenecked by the 3.0 ports most of these are destined to be used in for now.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 20:12 UTC
In reply to:

DesoloZantas: Tablets and laptops today needs to start putting in USB type-c port connectors so we can go faster in speeds

Yup, 3.1 != Type C and vice versa... And 3.1 is still not native on Intel chipsets, so it won't we truly widespread until it no longer requires an extra controller from Intel or a third party... Still it's been around on high end systems for years and 3.0 is still enough for a drive like this anyway that's moret really pushing past 500MB/s.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 20:09 UTC
In reply to:

Kavu: Made by Samsung...so you know it will last at least a month (or so)

They actually have a really good track record with SSD reliability, although no one's is spotless (even Intel had some duds, Samsung's would probably be the short lived 840), AND they've been crushing it on that market for quite a few years now.

The 850 EVO SATA SSDs I bought 2-3 years ago actually cost the same today as when I bought them, thru a combination of rising NAND demand and flat pricing (which we hadn't seen in years) and the fact that the competition is just now catching up to what Samsung was doing then.

So yeah, the quip couldn't be born out of anything but sheer ignorance IMO.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 20:04 UTC
In reply to:

Bambi24: To be honest though, which consumers are processing 2TB o video. Not that 4k doesn't take up a lot of space, it takes up massive amounts of space. But still, are there really that many people processing 4k. The only time I tried to process a 4k video I eventually ended up pushing ESC to stop the encoding because after 4 hours I had enough lol.

Nothing against 4k, amazing tech. But it seems like the encoding takes ages even on fast computers. I think 4k will be great in like a year or 2, when processing power is good enough and maybe when more and more programs use the graphics card to encode. But right now 4k is kind of a hassle more than a blessing for me.

Plenty of people are processing loads of 4K already, which has jack all to do with this SSD anyway, and processing power (for your dollar at least) probably jumped a few more notches this year than the last 4-5 combined (thanks to AMD finally getting competitive again in the high end / HEDT space)... Still, the processing power and proxy software to make a 4K workflow a reality has been available for a while, maybe just not in your average thin and light laptop.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 20:01 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): Do people really use wrist-straps? Seems like a dangling camera would be a pain in the neck and vulnerable to knocks.

It's not meant to dangle continuously from your wrist tho... The above commenter just described one of many temporary scenarios.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 09:14 UTC
In reply to:

Ian: How is this version of Camera different than the app for the Nexus phones? I had HDR+ on my Nexus 5 and now my 6P as well (v.4.3.016.14754696).

They did make it work that much faster on the Pixel tho, even compared to the Nexus 6P... Whether that's down to hardware or software might be another story. HDR+ on the Pixel is like instant, there was talk of grabbing images off the buffer for years etc but this is the first time I've seen it actually work seamlessly in practice.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 04:38 UTC
In reply to:

TN Args: Is "unofficial port" just another way of saying "illegal software hack"? And, if it is an illegal activity, why are you promoting it?

It's kind of a hack, not in the traditional sense but in the way it's pulled apart and put together. Not everything related to Android is open source and I doubt the camera app is since they were keeping it a Pixel exclusive... Some of the code might be, some might not, legal grey area at worst but I doubt Google cares to stop it.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 04:36 UTC
In reply to:

35mmBlueSky: Another half-baked product by Google, if you have an usable camera app, might as well stay original and be happy.

How is it a half baked project by Google? They didn't port this to any other phone nor did they mean to, it's enterprising user devs doing this, Google had nothing to do with it. The camera on my Pixel is quite stable, don't think I've actually seen it crash in 8 months tbh.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 04:34 UTC
In reply to:

Sactojim: Bought the Pixel upon release last fall and wow, impressive and a definite notch up above the iPhone 6S. Don't know what magic Google did, but it's impressive. iPhone killer at half the price.

The Pixel isn't really half the price of an iPhone, at least not in the US, it's actually priced almost exactly like an iPhone.

I'm quite happy with mine but it ran me $750 for the small version w/128GB, I spent it without much reservation because A) my Nexus 5 (which was far cheaper by comparison) did last me 3 solid years and B) there aren't a ton of great choices at $400-500 if you don't wanna go up to a 5.5" phone (and I didn't).

The camera impressed me too even tho I didn't really but it for the camera, they've really made HDR capture and processing just about instant and very seamless for the user... It's not really magic, just very fancy processing, but it's clever enough to impress and stand out from what anyone else is doing in that regard.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 04:32 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: google needs to offer a flexible Noise Reduction feature in its already superb android Snapseed app ...

I'd be happy if they simply added support for all the RAW file formats the iOS version supports, rather than just DNG.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 04:28 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Fried: Given that we have cheap digital controller chips today, why couldn't lens designers today just attach different motors to different lens elements via a similar rails system and precisely move them independently to create different focal lengths?

There would probably be some push back against electrically driven zoom action just like there's push back against the so called fly by wire focus of many/most mirrorless lenses... Tho I think if they put some more effort on the haptics (and stopped with the acceleration nonsense, even a 12 year old PC gamer can tell you that's annoying), it could work. There's certainly some power zoom lenses out there.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 04:25 UTC
In reply to:

SteveNunez: "Going" to kill ILC's"- not sure about that.......no way to zoom optically with real quality at 100% is a challenge- but the've certainly killed the P&S category!

I think the mass market has continually shown that if not most of it then at least a good chunk of it doesn't care a whole lot about zoom versatility, or doesn't know enough to know why they should care...

The dual focal length/dual module phones might do something to change that but I don't think they're being marketed very well, this is one thing Jobs would've excelled at (telling people why they absolutely gotta have that longer FL, making it magical, yadda yadda).

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 15:29 UTC
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