Impulses

Lives in Puerto Rico Puerto Rico
Works as a student
Joined on Apr 7, 2013

Comments

Total: 1483, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Fujica: What is the use of these highspeed cards other then 8K video and be able to shoot a full card of RAW files in one go with continuous high speed?

Who likes waiting for a buffer to clear before being able to shoot again? Files get larger, cameras shoot faster, cards get faster, it's pretty simple...

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 23:40 UTC
In reply to:

yslee1: I don't even have a UHS-II card yet and they're coming out with this already. As it is only a handful of cameras have UHS-II support...

It's way more than a handful, unless you're only looking at the couple brands that have dragged their feet on this.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 23:38 UTC
In reply to:

GodSpeaks: UHS-II cards have barely entered the market and now they are bringing out UHS-III.
It would be nice if the SD Association was better organized.

A spec HAS to precede actual products by a decent amount of time, how else would they be properly manufactured and tested to meet said spec otherwise? They're doing their job by adding headroom for products to grow into. Whether some camera manufacturers are failing to leverage all this is another story.

Dunno what you mean by UHS-II cards having barely entered the market anyway... If by barely you mean a couple years ago, sure. My Amazon order history shows I bought a 128GB UHS-II U3 Lexar Pro 1000x SDXC card back in June of 2015 (15, not 16); and I didn't pay an eye for it either ($57.95, seller was actually Adorama).

So they've been around longer than most of the cameras people are currently fawning over.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 05:21 UTC
In reply to:

brycesteiner: I remember when we DSLR photographers would laugh at the people using 'puny' little SD cards. Real photographers and 'Pro' cameras use only CF cards!

UHS SD is only now catching up with CFast, as a standard (ie the headroom for the most expensive card possible but probably still not in production yet); and it's entirely possible the larger form still makes it easier to actually produce really fast cards that maximize that standard.

Both standards will go by the wayside eventually anyway in favor of something UFS based, probably in an SD-like form factor. We can look forward to all the same complaints and random hysteria when DPR posts a news story about the (natch, it already happened).

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 05:11 UTC
In reply to:

Zoom Zoom Zoom: I'm so sick and tired of the BS speed ratings of ALL the cards in the market that are all "..speeds of up to xxxMB/s". These quotes and misleading marketing mean positively and absolutely nothing, zilch. The real world is not made of best case scenarios, fantastic lab testing or theoretical maximum speeds. Plus the fabulous speeds quotes are not legally regulated, anyone can say and claim whatever they want along with some disclaimers to make sure everyone actually doesn't understand what the the product can and will deliver. And of course there is always the added "cushion" that it all depends on the card's receiving hardware R/W capabilities.

Real world performance of all these cards is typically always about a fraction of what is claimed, some like by a 10 fold. My bet? I'd be awed if these can even do stable 30MB/'s sustained like they do now.

Endless BS..

It's actually nowhere near the dire, the camer side of the equation is a bigger mess than the cards are, unless you're buying cards from a shady brand. The one area they do obfuscate often is write speeds, Sandisk in particular loves hiding the write speed of lower end cards and drives but higher end ones usually feature it prominently.

When they say "up to" it's not really about perfect lab conditions or playing games with the consumer... That wording just means the card will reach that speed when dealing with larger sequential transfers (and video streams fit that usage case to a T). All flash drives and even hard drives have a tougher time dealing with random I/O.

Yeah it's a bit of marketing gamesmanship but you can blame the PC industry for it as much as anyone. Saying "10,000K IOPS" or "100MB/s random IO" has never sounded as sexy as claiming the performance possible during sequential transfers, which tends to be a larger and easier to grasp number.

Back to the original point tho, I've never bought a card that couldn't reach the number they claim for sequential transfers, in many many cases they actually surpass it.

Random I/O (probably more relevant for still burst shooting) is another story, you just have to be aware of that. The camera industry could come with a standard that deals with random I/O just like the video industry has their U/V ratings for sustained (ie sequential) speeds... But that would probably reveal how poorly many bodies leverage the fastest cards, probably why they don't.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 01:00 UTC
In reply to:

Sunshine7913: Come on. Most of cameras does not even support UHS-2 yet.

Maybe it's time to vote with your dollar then. My E-M5 II came out in 2015 and it can absolutely leverage UHS-II. It was never even marketed as a body partucularly adept for action shooting yet it can sustain about 5fps indefinitely witha fast enough card, the buffer is basically irrelevant until you ramp it up to 10fps. Honestly, any body $700+ that wasn't taking advantage of it by last year is failing hard IMO.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 00:51 UTC
In reply to:

Impulses: Is there actually a V60 rating? Like officially? Maybe the reason it's not being displayed is because it doesn't exist, because there's definitely several U3/V30 UHSHI cards that can manage sequential writes at double and triple their rating...

The ones that can do 60MB/s aren't even that expensive (90MB/s for writes does gets a little more expensive).

Usually new standards are all about increasing headroom well in advance of actual need. Cameras haven't been fully leveraging UHS-II until pretty recently (granted my E-M5 II took advantage of it and it's over a year old).

Hmm, I guess it comes out to what they mean by peak then and how the spec is detailed (if it is...)... Usually card ratings and performance isn't so much peak/bursts vs sustained as much as it is about the size of transfers. A lot of cards can easily sustain 60-90MB/s reliably, but only when dealing with larger files (like a video stream). Absolutely no card (even those rated V30) can sustain 30MB/s when writing smaller/random files (like JPEGs possibly).

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 00:45 UTC
In reply to:

brycesteiner: I remember when we DSLR photographers would laugh at the people using 'puny' little SD cards. Real photographers and 'Pro' cameras use only CF cards!

High end pro bodies still do, CFast etc... There's been a split between those and consumer bodies using SD for a while, with some optionally using both.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 22:50 UTC
In reply to:

Satyaa: The backward compatibility thing on UHS-II cards has not been good. There are not many cameras that work well with UHS-II. They insist on using UHS-I.

The backward compatibility mentioned in this announcement is a key thing. I hope cameras can now move on to faster cards.

Phones are the mass market for these cards. Once phones get on to 4K and start demanding faster cards, the others may follow.

Phones have been offering 4K for a while, tho at lower bitrate, and they're not any faster than cameras at adopting the newest standards... They're barely using UHS-I and often top out at something like 50MB/s in writing to cards. Phones have an advantage in that their internal storage is much faster tho.

Internal phone storage used to be eMMC based (basically the same core tech as these cards) but over the last two years they've moved to UFS solutions that can easily manage several hundred megabytes in read/write speeds and (more importantly) way faster random read/write speeds. In all likelihood UFS is probably the future for removable media too but it's several years out from adoption.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 22:49 UTC
In reply to:

SHood: Just to give some perspective, the UHS-II standard was announced in January 2011 to support 312mb/s.

https://www.engadget.com/2011/01/05/sd-association-triples-sdhc-and-sdxc-speeds-with-uhs-ii-standard/

6 years later the fastest cameras (E-M1ii and D500) can support 163mb/s. That would suggest in 6 year from now (2023) the faster cameras would be able to support ~300mb/s.

It seems like we are going at a snails pace in supporting new SD standards

It's not so much the memory speed per se as the controllers, the way to make faster/larger flash drives is usually to access more NAND in parallel, but that requires a larger and more power hungry controller which obviously doesn't work as well in a tiny card.

Storage standards have ALWAYS outpaced devices and even the actual media, I wouldn't be so hard on camera companies. The standards and protocols are supposed to come well in advance, so they're vetted and ready by the time products are ready to use them.

The camera companies I'd be hardest on would be the ones that are not even leveraging UHS-II yet, and there's several of them that haven't, specially on midrange bodies.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 22:43 UTC

Is there actually a V60 rating? Like officially? Maybe the reason it's not being displayed is because it doesn't exist, because there's definitely several U3/V30 UHSHI cards that can manage sequential writes at double and triple their rating...

The ones that can do 60MB/s aren't even that expensive (90MB/s for writes does gets a little more expensive).

Usually new standards are all about increasing headroom well in advance of actual need. Cameras haven't been fully leveraging UHS-II until pretty recently (granted my E-M5 II took advantage of it and it's over a year old).

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 22:26 UTC as 16th comment | 3 replies
On article Fujifilm updates X-mount lens roadmap (54 comments in total)
In reply to:

Christian Unger: wow, by having a roadmap nowadays(!), Fuji are really going full retro - nice.

Probably alluding to the fact that many other brands have abandoned any and all roadmap-like announcements.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 17:13 UTC
On article Canon debuts EOS M6 mirrorless with optional EVF (643 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bhima78: Who is this camera for? And why would you buy this for $780 +$250 (EVF) when you can just get the M5 for $970? Are there really that many people wanting to drop $800 on a camera without a viewfinder?

<cough> G80

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2017 at 23:04 UTC
In reply to:

Gimli son of Gloin: I know the mFT fans are excited about this cam but I still maintain that a 1 inch sensor bridge cams gives similar, if not equal, IQ with much more versatility in video, reach and compactness than the current crop of mFT cams.

The only thing against a bridge camera would be price but the E-M1 is certainly higher.

Good times indeed.

Have there ever been any bridge cameras (never mind whether it has a 1" sensor or not) with UWA lenses? I thought Nikon was gonna carve out a pretty unique niche with the UW DL model, before it got killed off. I shoot UW a lot, and it seems the guy in this clip did too, so a bridge camera wouldn't when be in the running...

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2017 at 22:59 UTC
In reply to:

brycesteiner: A real advantage is the 1/2 size sensor when it comes to sports. Giving the extra "zoom" is fantastic when you are comparing images to the 35mm sensor size.
Some speak as though it's a disadvantage--nope! It's what makes the pictures better in my book. And now with the amazing focusing abilities in the E-M1 Mk2, it truly is the camera built for sports.

Tennis and snow sports represent quite a different shooting scenario... One is more unpredictable and benefits far more from deeper DoF...

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2017 at 22:55 UTC

So much for getting an ultra wide P&S with a 1" sensor, that would've been something really unique. Is there any UWA P&S in existence at all?

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 03:14 UTC as 125th comment | 1 reply

How about getting them to add exposure compensation under manual to the E-M1 & E-M5 II? Between the two dials and the 2x2 switch it'd be a trivial matter (and I suspect a lot of people would add it as one of the 4 parameters on tap in lieu of WB), and they already had the logic/code for it in the PEN-F (which predates any of the larger UI changes in the E-M1 II). That'd be huge for me, frankly.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 08:11 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

Daniil L.: So cool! Bought a cam in november well knowing about video issues, and now they all gone. Bravo panasonic! :D

Shame. Anybody that judges others so smugly deserves all the mockery they can get.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 01:21 UTC

Looks like an upscale competitor to the Tenba Cooper... I like the look and pockets better on the latter but this Think Tank probably has a better strap, weighs more too tho. The news blurb mentions something about one handed front latches, which is something half the commenters probably missed. Think Tank is gonna turn off people prematurely if they don't highlight that.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 01:16 UTC as 11th comment
On article DPReview and the TWiT Network team-up to talk cameras (24 comments in total)
In reply to:

brumd: Middle-aged guys getting excited about technologies from their younger days having a small comeback. Oh, the nostalgia! I guess there is an audience for this. Somewhere.

Everybody starts somewhere, and old content isn't always easily accessible... I have zero issues with this kinda stuff being floated up on DPR, even tho I didn't make it more than a few minutes in myself.

I have way more of an issue with the snobbish attitude a lot of people brandish which is probably part of the reason cameras have become a niche market, this while being right in the middle of one of the biggest boons for general interest in photography too... Sigh.

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2017 at 06:30 UTC
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