awelch100

awelch100

Lives in United States Jacksonville, FL, United States
Has a website at http://www.apwimages.com/
Joined on Sep 10, 2012

Comments

Total: 36, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

TwoMetreBill: For creatives? Almost. We are going to connect a 4K monitor and for Adobe software to work without artifacts, 16GB of video ram is needed. Also 32GB of RAM is good but again Adobe's software works much better with 64GB. So a lightweight system better than the typical lightweight laptop but serious users will be disappointed.

True, if you're an feature film editor or compositor and need to work with 8K or multiple 4K clips, this isn't for you. However, the vast majority of "creatives" aren't going to need those kind of specs. This seems to be a great little system for photographers, videographers or graphic designers.
Like you, though, I need a bit more power. I'm about to spend the next 6-12 months working around Europe so I needed a beefy laptop. I ended up getting a Lenovo Legion 7i "gaming" laptop. It has an 16" 16:10 display, i7-11800H, 32GB RAM, 1TB SSD and a 165w RTX 3080 w/16GB VRAM, and unlike the AMD version, Thunderbolt4 and PCI-E 4.0. I upgraded it to 64GB RAM and added a second SSD (it has two M.2 connectors). With a slight undervolt/overclock using Intel Extreme Tuning Utility, the system easily hits 15000 in Cinebench. The only downside is that the display is 100% sRGB but not P3. Not a big deal though since I wouldn't do any serious color grading on a laptop display anyway.

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2021 at 21:23 UTC
In reply to:

runbei99: Not for me. As a sometimes video guy, I can get more done in Filmora (not the Pro version). I had Resolve installed, may work my way into it as needed particularly for color grading. But for now - sorry, not enough learning resources for beginners.

Training
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/training

Manual
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/support/family/davinci-resolve-and-fusion

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2020 at 18:08 UTC
In reply to:

MrBrightSide: Learn from my experience:
NEVER, EVER MOVE MOVIE CLIPS TO A DIFFERENT DRIVE OR FOLDER AFTER THEY'VE BEEN IMPORTED INTO RESOLVE! NEVER! EVER!
The reason being is that Resolve uses a database (sort of like Lightroom) to keep track of files; if you move files after they've been imported it confuses the system on many levels and you may wind up having to reimport all your clips.
Also, use proxy files.

NHR505 Just select your files in the Media page, right-click (two finger tap on Mac) on them and select “Generate Optimized Media” on the dropdown menu that appears.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2020 at 18:03 UTC
In reply to:

Mangozoom: Only have some experience with Apple's iMovie so far and thought I'm going to upgrade to Final Cut Pro one day. In doubt now if I should rather spend the 300 bucks on Resolve 16. Any thoughts on FCP vs. Resolve 16 ?

Another benefit of Resolve is that it’s cross platform. Have a MacBook Pro and a PC workstation? No problem. FCPX is Mac only.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2020 at 17:59 UTC
In reply to:

Gazeomon: Still seems quite complex for a beginner. No tutorial! What is a NLE?

There is a huge amount of learning material on Blackmagic Design’s site. There is a 3200 page manual, a 444 page “Beginners Guide To Davinci Resolve”, a number of video tutorials (including project media) and a support forum.

Training
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/training

Manual
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/support/family/davinci-resolve-and-fusion

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2020 at 17:56 UTC
In reply to:

runbei99: Not for me. As a sometimes video guy, I can get more done in Filmora (not the Pro version). I had Resolve installed, may work my way into it as needed particularly for color grading. But for now - sorry, not enough learning resources for beginners.

Blackmagic Design’s site has a 3200 page Resolve manual, a free 444 page “Beginners Guide To Davinci Resolve” PDF, a number of free video tutorials (including project file media) and a support forum.
On top of that there are hundreds of YouTube tutorial videos available for Resolve.
How many more learning resources do you need? 😛

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2020 at 17:46 UTC
In reply to:

sturmen: I've been using Resolve as a hobbyist for about 2 years now and I've been very pleased. Just wanted to take a small issue with the "lack of support documentation" bullet in the negative section: the DaVinci Resolve Reference Manual (accessible via the help menu or downloadable from the website) is actually one of the most complete documentation I've ever seen for such a complex program. It is, of course, very dry reading, but remarkably thorough. I could never find anything similar for Premiere Pro... to find any advance workflows or functions, I would be searching Google for 3 year old blog posts from someone who had actually had a chance to speak to a Premiere Pro engineer at Adobe MAX.

Yeah, the Resolve manual is worth looking over even if you don’t use Resolve since it contains a ton of good info on video related tech in general.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2020 at 17:34 UTC
In reply to:

MrBrightSide: Learn from my experience:
NEVER, EVER MOVE MOVIE CLIPS TO A DIFFERENT DRIVE OR FOLDER AFTER THEY'VE BEEN IMPORTED INTO RESOLVE! NEVER! EVER!
The reason being is that Resolve uses a database (sort of like Lightroom) to keep track of files; if you move files after they've been imported it confuses the system on many levels and you may wind up having to reimport all your clips.
Also, use proxy files.

Huh? It’s trivial to re-link media in Resolve, you don’t have to re-import anything. Am I missing something?

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2020 at 17:30 UTC
On article Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VII Review (1002 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrHollywood: This, like the M6 and VA models, is another benchmark compact. People who don't own one really have no idea of how well it works in so many situations. It replaced one of my small DSLRs, Ricoh GRII and Fuji X100f. I consider it BETTER Than all of those 99% of the time.
No, it can't replace my D850 and big lenses, but it's a terrific travel/street/hiking and almost everything camera.

I had the opposite experience. I went to a country that can be less than friendly to journalists, so I had to go incognito and leave my a7Rii and lenses behind. I ended up bringing a Fujifilm X100S and a Sony RX100V because they look fairly benign but are still capable. While on assignment, I found the Fujifilm to be better the vast majority of the time, despite the fixed focal length. The fast lens and big sensor really made a difference when it came to the overall attractiveness of the images and the controls and handling were much faster. That being said, the RX100V+ series cameras really do shoot surprisingly nice video. If Sony made a version of the RX100VII with a fast, 24-70mm equivalent zoom then I would be very tempted to use it as a B-roll or backup camera. (Note: This is just my stupid opinion. I understand that my needs aren't your needs and the RX100 series cameras may be the better choice for you).

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2019 at 14:54 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): I've heard it said that the processors in cameras, even high-end cameras, are not as powerful as the ones in recent flagship smartphones and that this is part of the reason why phones are able to offer features and computational enhancements that cameras cannot. Why then are camera makers sticking with their in-house processor designs rather than buying the same processors as smartphone manufacturers, such as this Snapdragon here? I know that Apple's embedded processors are proprietary, but Android phones use processors that anyone can buy. Why do camera makers not seem to take advantage of that?

FPGA's are another option that companies such as Blackmagic have been using in their cameras rather than buying off the shelf imaging processors.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2019 at 17:47 UTC
In reply to:

upptick: What the video doesn't go into is the source of the knowledge needed to construct the lens, or any other item of manufacture, for that matter. That's where the patent system comes in. If you want to learn how to make literally anything, search the patent database and you will find your answer. Of course, YouTube provides all the shortcuts....

Of course you are correct that the patent system is broken. However, my point is that any patent that contains information that could be useful for making a homemade lens has probably expired a long, long time ago. Patents are only valid for 20 years, so any patent granted before 1999 is now expired. Besides, any lens patent that is still valid is probably useless to a home lens maker since the replicating it would require incredibly expensive industrial equipment.

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2019 at 23:30 UTC
In reply to:

upptick: What the video doesn't go into is the source of the knowledge needed to construct the lens, or any other item of manufacture, for that matter. That's where the patent system comes in. If you want to learn how to make literally anything, search the patent database and you will find your answer. Of course, YouTube provides all the shortcuts....

I think he's referring to expired patents, of which there are over two hundred years worth. Besides, any process worth patenting in the last twenty years is probably far too complex and specialized for a DIY project anyway.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2019 at 00:31 UTC
On article Review: Color night vision with the SiOnyx Aurora (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

DiffractionLtd: "while I was able to easily focus using the Aurora EVF, it was impossible for me to focus using the D5 viewfinder or Live View mode."
This is the case with most mirrorless cameras and their EVF's versus a DSLR's OVF. However, some DSLR's can focus in extreme dimness, below the point where you can see to compose the image!

The D5 can't focus well in these condition because there is almost no light getting to the sensor! If the IR filter was removed, as it was with the Aurora, I suspect the D5 would fare much better.

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2018 at 17:50 UTC
On article Insta 360 launches ONE X 360-degree 5.7K action camera (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

Julian: So now all I need is a spherical display for the 360 videos or? Those videos don't look 360 to me - more like 180, but then thats partly due to my display being flat...

@Julian- There is- YouTube. Here is a sample video taken with the Insta 360 ONE X....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qH_vEBdQA7w

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2018 at 20:11 UTC
On article First impressions: DJI Mavic 2 Pro and Mavic 2 Zoom (126 comments in total)
In reply to:

zodiacfml: Any image quality comparisons? The 1 inch sensor is marginally better than original Mavic, at least in video. It might show better results in image capture.

It's a huge improvement over the original Mavic Pro. It may not be a "night and day" difference straight out of the camera, but when you grade the footage it will be clear. You will be able to recover more of the highlights, the shadows won't be as noisy and overall detail level will be improved. The combination of a 1" sensor, 10-bit encoding and a much more efficient codec (h.265) makes a big difference.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2018 at 14:31 UTC
In reply to:

MirkoK: i still would like to know what part hasselblad contributed to the 2 pro, hasselblad never in their history built lenses or designed their own sensors.
they are building camera bodies, and these days include medium format sensors in them(x1d and digital backs).

I'm sure it's the same kind of contributions that Leica made to Huawei smartphones and Zeiss made to Sony's superzooms- nothing, other than their branding.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2018 at 02:33 UTC
In reply to:

ozy82: Could this kind of sensor be the future for the A7S line. Low-light 4K and daytime 8K. Very interesting indeed

It's not an urban legend on non-BSI sensors. Having more surface area dedicated to photon collection is why the A7Rm3 (BSI) performs better than the A7S (non-BSI).

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2018 at 13:55 UTC
In reply to:

mosc: Sony should have let them use E-mount. These lenses wouldn't be that much bigger and it would open so many more lens options for their drone/camera. Sony sells more lenses and they probably already make the sensor so how do they not win?

Two reasons- 1) Money. A proprietary mount means that people have to buy lenses from DJI. 2) Size and weight. The gimbal and drone need to be properly balanced. Throwing random E-mount lenses on it would be disastrous. Some dummy would inevitably destroy their camera and gimbal by trying to fly a 70-200mm f/2.8 or the like.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2017 at 14:41 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): With 1000 fps, HDR photography should become a pleasure to use. Take for instance 2 shots in 2/1000s of a second. Even if a bit more time would be needed for full size images, the results might make discussions about dynamic range of smartphones obsolete!

While the sensor may be able to do a full readout 1000 times per second, that doesn't mean that the camera can capture images at that speed. The actual frame rate will be determined by a number of factors, including memory speed and bandwidth. In other words, the camera is only as fast as it's slowest part. Where this will make a definite difference is in video capture. The fast sensor readout will eliminate much of the "jello" effect caused by the CMOS sensor's rolling shutter.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2017 at 17:08 UTC
In reply to:

K25: what is the point of fixed lens digital cameras?
Fixed lens cameras had 2 main advantages vs. ILC in film/flashbulbs era: 1) size (thanks mirrorless) 2) shorter flash synchro time (thanks central shutter)
But nowadays?

More compact with better optics than an equivalent ILC, leaf shutter, built in 3 stop ND filter.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2017 at 13:05 UTC
Total: 36, showing: 1 – 20
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