Peter 1745

Lives in United Kingdom Sussex, United Kingdom
Joined on Mar 23, 2007

Comments

Total: 109, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

ShaiKhulud: Wow. USA isn't the world, but it's the world's biggest photography market (by value) for sure.

I don't know about Europe as a whole, but buying A7-3 in Russia right now is a pain. Total out of stock. Heck. I'm still waiting when my supplier will fullfill 24-105 F4 order that was placed back in April.

I'm not saying that the USA isn't an important market but it isn't the biggest.

According to the CIPA figures North America isn't the worlds largest photographic market either by market value or unit sales. It comes in third behind Asia and Europe.

http://www.cipa.jp/stats/documents/e/d-201806_e.pdf

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2018 at 15:02 UTC
On article Video: 5 DIY photography storage 'hacks' (129 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter 1745: I've glued a bunch of rear lens caps onto a board which lies flat in a draw. I store my small and medium sized lenses on them. Large lenses I lie flat between straight wooden slats screwed to the board. Stops the lenses rolling about when the draw is opened and closed. The spacing of the rear lens caps isn't uniform with space between them increasing from left to right. Bigger lenses need more space between them than smaller lenses.
Works for me.

@ljclark. Good idea, one that I have been using for several years? I agree epoxy is essential. As an additional strengthening measure i drill small holes through the the rear of the lens caps before applying the epoxy to give it something for the epoxy to key to.
As a further refinement I wrap a brightly coloured tape around them as it makes me less likely to lose them.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2018 at 08:54 UTC
On article Video: 5 DIY photography storage 'hacks' (129 comments in total)

I was going to store my lenses in order of their maximum aperture but couldn't decide whether to store my Panasonic 50mm f/1.4 lens m43 lens as a 1.4 or as a 2.8 equivalent lens. I also thought about storing by focal length but once again couldn't decide if the above lens should be stored as a 50mm or as a 100mm equilvalent focal length.
Next I considered storing them in order of their depth of field at the widest apeture, which would remove the equivalence problem, but what should I do with zooms, should I use the wide or telephoto end of the zoom or use the median value?
I ignored a helpful suggestion to store in ascending serial numbers and eventually went for a utilitarian approach and stored my most used lenses at the front and my least used lenses at the back.
If anyone has any better ideas on the order I should store my lenses I am open to suggestions

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2018 at 11:41 UTC as 44th comment | 6 replies
On article Video: 5 DIY photography storage 'hacks' (129 comments in total)

I've glued a bunch of rear lens caps onto a board which lies flat in a draw. I store my small and medium sized lenses on them. Large lenses I lie flat between straight wooden slats screwed to the board. Stops the lenses rolling about when the draw is opened and closed. The spacing of the rear lens caps isn't uniform with space between them increasing from left to right. Bigger lenses need more space between them than smaller lenses.
Works for me.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2018 at 11:15 UTC as 45th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Franz Weber: I officially anounce:
In the near future I will post a mindblowing β€œindustry leading” comment here, that will impress everyboy and change our lives for the better. Please understand that I cannot give further hints to the subject of this posting, but stay tuned.

@ Franz
Will you be releasing an adapter that will allow all previous comments to become applicable to your new "industry leading " comment? I have an extensive library of old comments and would hate for them to become obsolete.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2018 at 08:13 UTC
On article Canon launches updated EF 70-200mm F4L IS II (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: Meeeeeeeehhhhhhhhhhh πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜ž

@StefanD
The example you link to refers to C-AF where the camera is calculating where the subject will be and moving the focusing elements, in a single movement, to a predicted position. It is doing it at 16fps which equates to 16fms. CDAF sucks at C-AF due to its lack of predictive capability. The E-M1 uses only PDAF in C-AF mode and, with the latest firmware, has speed and accuracy approaching that of the 1DXii.

Things are different in S-AF where the E-M1uses hybridAF (an initial PDAF movement followed by CDAF), which is more accurate than PDAF and faster than CDAF on its own.

It is important to remember that the lens doesn't know if its focus instructions are derived from CDAF or PDAF. It just receives instructions to move from one focus position to another. How quickly a lens can respond to these instructions depends on its communication capabilities (EOS 7 contacts, m43 11); focus motor; inertia; friction & stiction characturistics. Currently- PDAF lens 16fms; CDAF lens 240fms.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2018 at 11:23 UTC
On article Canon launches updated EF 70-200mm F4L IS II (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: Meeeeeeeehhhhhhhhhhh πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜ž

@StefanD
Yes, PDAF can make iterative movements and already does so in C-AF, but this is at a low number of fms (Focus Movements per Second). For fast iterative focus you need higher fms speed. The first m43 lenses were similar in design to DSLR lenses and were slow to focus due to their low maximum fms speed. Fast S-AF was achieved with new lenses capable of 60fms. The latest Panasonic lenses are now capable of 240fms.
4 years experience using Olympus 43 DSLR lenses on mirrorless cameras with on sensor PDAF has shown that DSLR lenses are not capable of high fms speeds. 43 lenses work as well, or slightly better, than they did on 43 bodies using single cycle PDAF but can't do iterative focus movements at an acceptable speed.
Can PDAF sensors be made capable of high fms instruction speeds? Yes, easily. Can existing DSLR lenses use these speeds? No, as they weren't designed for it.
My point is that fast iterative focus needs lenses designed to do it and existing DSLR lenses aren't.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2018 at 09:04 UTC
On article Canon launches updated EF 70-200mm F4L IS II (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: Meeeeeeeehhhhhhhhhhh πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜ž

@SamuelC
I agree that DualPixelAF requires no calibration for its plane of focus, unlike the old DSLR separate PDAF sensors. It will measure the phase difference accurately. However it is still a predictive AF. It moves the focus elements to where it thinks they should be be for perfect focus. Due to the individual charaturistics of every lens the actual amount of movement required will vary. Lenses include calibration data that tell the camera that when at focal point x, y amount of movement is required to get to focal point z. However there are an infinite amount of possible combinations of focal points so approximation have to be made resulting in inaccurate focus calculations.
CDAF is not predictive and will keep adjusting the focus until accurate focus is achieved. Measuring contrast is better than measuring phase for this.
Moving the phase detection to the image sensor has no effect on the lens characturistics, (how could it?) so has no effect on the need for lens calibration.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2018 at 15:19 UTC
On article Canon launches updated EF 70-200mm F4L IS II (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: Meeeeeeeehhhhhhhhhhh πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜ž

@SamuelC continued

Your statement below is only true for lenses not designed for CDAF (i.e. virtually all DSLR lenses).

"There is no way modern DPAF could lock focus so quickly if it had to do a final CDAF adjustment for every shot".

It isn't true for lenses designed for it. Sony, Fuji, Olympus and Panasonic have a massive head start in this regard as almost all their lenses can rapidly focus using combined CDAF/PDAF.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2018 at 13:31 UTC
On article Canon launches updated EF 70-200mm F4L IS II (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: Meeeeeeeehhhhhhhhhhh πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜ž

@SamuelC.
PDAF works by: a) measuring the phase difference; b) predicting how much the lens needs to be focused; c) moving the focusing elements of the lens to the predicted position. Moving the PDAF sensor to the image sensor improves a) but does nothing to improve b) or c).
The prediction is based on calibration data stored in the lens but isn't 100% accurate. Small errors can occur leading to front/back focusing.

With PDAF the focusing element move in one step to the predicted position but there is a small amount of tolerance in the movement and the focus point may under or over shoot the intended position. Admittedly the errors in PDAF are small but they are there.

CDAF, on the otherhand, repeatedly moves the focusing elements in small steps until it finds accurate focus.

The E-M1ii has very fast focus dispite making final CDAF adjustments after PDAF on every shot (except at high burst rates), but requires lenses designed to do this. With legacy 4/3 lenses it just uses PDAF.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2018 at 13:06 UTC
On article Canon launches updated EF 70-200mm F4L IS II (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: Meeeeeeeehhhhhhhhhhh πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜ž

@MatthewSaville.
Assuming the new Canon mirrorless cameras have PDAF capabilities, either from dual pixel or dedicated on sensor photosites, then DSLR lenses will work just as well on them as on DSLRs.

However native mirrorless lenses will focus faster and with more accuracy. CDAF is more accurate than PDAF and is used in conjunction with PDAF on mirrorless systems. To get fast CDAF the lenses will need different friction, stiction & inertia characteristics and will need finer control of focus element movement than PDAF only lenses.

The size, weight and optical performance of mirrorless lenses may be same, worse or better than current lenses depending on design decisions made by Canon.

In other words, you will loose nothing when using existing lenses on mirrorless bodies but you will gain faster and more accurate focus if you use native mirrorless lenses.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2018 at 06:03 UTC
On article Canon launches updated EF 70-200mm F4L IS II (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

LessMirrored19: Meeeeeeeehhhhhhhhhhh πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜žπŸ˜ž

@StefanD
Lens design requirements for mirrorless and DSLR lenses are different.
CDAF is used on mirrorless cameras with PDAF to fine tune the focus, after the coarse PDAF focus movement, to prevent front/back focus issues. This requires smaller, faster, more precise movements than are required on DSLR's PDAF only lenses.

I suspect that Canon has tweaked the lens's electronics, internal position sensors and focus motors to make this lens perform better on mirrorless bodies than its predecessor.

Olympus did the same thing in 2008 with some 4/3 DSLR lenses prior to the launch of its mirrorless m4/3 system.

Eventually these "hybrid" lenses were replaced with newer optical designs that had light weight focusing elements enabling very rapid CDAF movements.

The latest generation of Panasonic m4/3 lenses are capable of 240 focus movements a second (fms). The first m4/3 lenses were only capable of about 30 fms.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2018 at 15:00 UTC

"I got it for free so why should I pay now?" appears to be an anti-social attitude to me.

If you get value from the software and haven't paid for it, then why shouldn't you want to contribute to its further development.

The update fees aren't excessive and no subscription is required.

The way I look at it is that the period that it was available for free should been as a very long "Try before you buy" scheme. You've tried it, you like it, so why not buy it.

I have sympathy for those who paid for it before it became free and who are now being asked to pay for it again but understand why this is so.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2018 at 16:01 UTC as 39th comment | 3 replies

It looks very nice and if I were in the market for an E-PL9 I would buy it over a black or silver one.

However the features of the E-PL9 don't meet my needs so I'll not be buying one.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2018 at 11:11 UTC as 56th comment

Still photography has 2 dimensions. Add an extra dimension of time and you get video photography.

The still photography exposure triangle has 2 dimensions. Add an extra dimension and you get a tetrahedron, which has 4 points equally distributed in 3D space.

Therefore the video exposure shape is tetrahedral, not square, rhomboid, diamond or any other 2D shape.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2018 at 08:26 UTC as 39th comment

Olympus cameras have had the ability to store shooting parameters as "Mysets" for years. I assumed Nikon cameras already had this ability and am surprised that they are only getting it now. Better late than never.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2018 at 17:45 UTC as 10th comment | 10 replies

Updated OM-D and Pen camera manuals for new firmware can be found here

http://cs.olympus-imaging.jp/en/support/imsg/digicamera/download/manual/pen.cfm#body

At the end of each manual there is a section about the features added by firmware.

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2018 at 16:06 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Ken Croft: The blurb says in focus stacking the image is shifted in half pixel increments.surely that is nonsense
That is a description of high resolution mode isn't it?

@ fillkay
New manuals for the updated firmware can be found here:

http://cs.olympus-imaging.jp/en/support/imsg/digicamera/download/manual/pen.cfm#body

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2018 at 16:03 UTC
In reply to:

tonyC1994: Can anyone point out the percentile is based on value or unit? My best guess is value after some Google search, but not 100% sure.

Units not value.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 20:52 UTC

In the mirrorless sector the % sold by the first 3 adds up to 69.2%.
This leaves 30.8% unaccounted for. Most of this will be Fuji and Panasonic sales.
Their sales must be fairly close to each other for each of them to be below Sony's 20.2% . I would guess each has a 15+-2% market share. I wouldn't like to say which has the larger sales.

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 20:51 UTC as 84th comment | 4 replies
Total: 109, showing: 41 – 60
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