Correction man

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Joined on May 12, 2014

Comments

Total: 94, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

darlot: live view on a rangefinder camera :) what's the point ? I thought all RF users want Leica so they can use RF .

" I agree though that it defeats the idea of having a rangefinder"
does it not also defeat the idea of having a DSLR too ?

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2017 at 23:40 UTC
In reply to:

Chasing Summer: The comment about this being a Cosina camera is untrue. This is a Fujifilm camera, made by Fujifilm for itself and for Voightlander. It is a truly outstanding medium format film camera, and out of every camera I own (and there are MANY) it would be the last one I would part with. Compact, lightweight, an incredibly sharp lens with great bokeh, it's the ultimate travel medium format body. I carry it every day in my messenger bag, and despite having an X100T in the same bag it's the one I choose when I want an image to treasure.

Sure you can get a GW690 for less money, but until you see them side by side don't give me that argument - the GF670 is a fraction of the size and weight, and features a very accurate lightmeter. Compare it to a 645? Well, can a 645 take 6x7 images? I don't think so.

This camera doesn't appeal to many, but the folks who want one KNOW that they won't be happy with anything less. Now if only Fuji would find a cache of GF670W cameras I'd be extra happy!

Fuji also make The Body and lenses for Hasselblads H system

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 13:39 UTC
In reply to:

Chasing Summer: The comment about this being a Cosina camera is untrue. This is a Fujifilm camera, made by Fujifilm for itself and for Voightlander. It is a truly outstanding medium format film camera, and out of every camera I own (and there are MANY) it would be the last one I would part with. Compact, lightweight, an incredibly sharp lens with great bokeh, it's the ultimate travel medium format body. I carry it every day in my messenger bag, and despite having an X100T in the same bag it's the one I choose when I want an image to treasure.

Sure you can get a GW690 for less money, but until you see them side by side don't give me that argument - the GF670 is a fraction of the size and weight, and features a very accurate lightmeter. Compare it to a 645? Well, can a 645 take 6x7 images? I don't think so.

This camera doesn't appeal to many, but the folks who want one KNOW that they won't be happy with anything less. Now if only Fuji would find a cache of GF670W cameras I'd be extra happy!

Fuji dont make this for Cosina
Cosina made this camera for themselves and for Fuji

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 13:02 UTC
In reply to:

Chasing Summer: The comment about this being a Cosina camera is untrue. This is a Fujifilm camera, made by Fujifilm for itself and for Voightlander. It is a truly outstanding medium format film camera, and out of every camera I own (and there are MANY) it would be the last one I would part with. Compact, lightweight, an incredibly sharp lens with great bokeh, it's the ultimate travel medium format body. I carry it every day in my messenger bag, and despite having an X100T in the same bag it's the one I choose when I want an image to treasure.

Sure you can get a GW690 for less money, but until you see them side by side don't give me that argument - the GF670 is a fraction of the size and weight, and features a very accurate lightmeter. Compare it to a 645? Well, can a 645 take 6x7 images? I don't think so.

This camera doesn't appeal to many, but the folks who want one KNOW that they won't be happy with anything less. Now if only Fuji would find a cache of GF670W cameras I'd be extra happy!

wrong it's made by Cosina and there was a Voightlander version a few years ago

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 23:28 UTC

$675

don't think i'll bother

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2016 at 18:53 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

Watch my language ?? pot kettle black
"Clearly reading comprehension is beyond you"

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2016 at 18:26 UTC
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

you really are stupid
I can read and research

"Are you sure about Leica coming before Contax? I thought Ansel Adams referred to the Leica as the "poor man's Contax" for years. Contax cameras and Zeiss lenses were almost completely out of reach. Leitz actually started by undercutting Zeiss in price."

you clearly stated that Leica STARTED by undercutting Zeiss which is bul$hit
Leica started production a full 8 years before CONTAX made a camera .

Leica was the company which invented 35mm photography Contax copied the idea

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2016 at 00:57 UTC
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

How did Leica manage to undercut Zeiss when Zeiss didn't make a camera till 1932 ? and leica first made production cameras 1924

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2016 at 15:45 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Olympus C-3040 Zoom (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: I didn't own this camera but did own the C4000z which came out later and was 4mp. The IQ was excellent but the optical viewfinder and LCD were atrocious which didn't hold me back.

I still have my C4000z from 2003
It was also good with an Infra Red filter in front of the lens did some good IR but it needed a tripod and 8 sec exposures :)

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2016 at 16:11 UTC
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

Leica first prototype camera 1913. first production camera 1924
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leica_Camera
Contax first production cameras 1932
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contax

so E.Leitz (Leica) started by undercutting CONTAX in price
EIGHT years before Contax existed ... great trick if you can pull it off :D

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 23:36 UTC
In reply to:

Correction man: didn't canon start of life by copying Leica ?

"plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose"

The early canons were Leica copies not contax copies
https://www.cameraquest.com/crf2f2.htm
Nikons were clearly Contax copies
https://www.cameraquest.com/NRFOne.htm

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 23:25 UTC
In reply to:

Dheorl: Do the Chinese even have a word for copyright?

I think all the canon lenses which Yonguo have "Copied" are well out of copyright

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2016 at 18:56 UTC
In reply to:

dwill23: They get canon gear, reverse engineer it, rebuilt it and sell it. I have one of their flashes for my canon. It mounts loosely, but otherwise works pretty well.

I don't think the folks at canon are too happy about this.

canon started of life by copying Leica

"plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose"

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2016 at 18:33 UTC

didn't canon start of life by copying Leica ?

"plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose"

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2016 at 18:32 UTC as 55th comment | 6 replies
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Correction man: It's a shame hassy and Fuji dint use a common lens system after all they are both made by Fuji

"it says handmade in Sweden on the top - sorry to be so pedantic..."
on the camera NOT on the lenses

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2016 at 18:27 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Correction man: It's a shame hassy and Fuji dint use a common lens system after all they are both made by Fuji

I think it's these people Nittō Kōgaku of Japan
http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Nitt%C5%8D_K%C5%8Dgaku
sometimes known as NITTOH

"Q. Is this camera designed by or in collaboration with Fuji?
A. We have a fantastic relationship with Fuji, but this product has been completely designed, conceptualised and manufactured here in Sweden and assembled in Japan by Nittoh. Fuji has absolutely nothing to do with it

Correction: Only the new lenses are assembled by Nittoh, not the cameras - they are assembled in Gothenburg, Sweden. Therefore the Made in Sweden mark on the camera."
http://photorumors.com/2016/06/27/hasselblad-x1d-camera-qa/

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 16:58 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Correction man: It's a shame hassy and Fuji dint use a common lens system after all they are both made by Fuji

So Fuji only makes the lenses for the H system ? and not for the Hassy mirror-less ?

that makes sense of why two distinct lens ranges thanks

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 13:04 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (147 comments in total)

It's a shame hassy and Fuji dint use a common lens system after all they are both made by Fuji

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 12:18 UTC as 22nd comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

endofoto: If Fuji gives this baby a resonable price tag, it will kill Sony, Nikon even Hasselblad.

Fuji has an excellent record of making Medium format cameras and lenses (inc those it makes for Hassy) also fuji large format lenses are excellent
I'm not sure if Fuji makes the lenses for the Hassy Mirror-less camera but times are looking good for medium format :)
I just need to will the lottery now :D

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 18:40 UTC
In reply to:

endofoto: If Fuji gives this baby a resonable price tag, it will kill Sony, Nikon even Hasselblad.

Why would Fuji want to kill "Hassy" ?
Fuji makes the Hassy body and the Lenses ....

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 15:06 UTC
Total: 94, showing: 1 – 20
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