rossd

Joined on May 31, 2016

rossd's recent activity

  • I bought this a few weeks ago to use with my Sony A3500 mirrorless camera As this is an a mount lens I used it with my Sony LAEA-4 a mount to e mount adapter No regrets Best zoom I have used The ...
  • Submitted a challenge entry Early morning drink
    Placed 61st in the challenge.
  • Submitted a challenge entry Pink-eared Duck
    Malacorhynchus membranaceus
Anatidae
The Pink-eared Duck is named after an insignificant spot of pink feathers on the side of the drake’s head. More striking are the bold black-and-white stripes which dominate the ducks’ neck, breast and underparts, giving rise to its vernacular name of Zebra Duck or Zebra Teal. Pink-eared Ducks have odd-shaped bills, evolved to feed in a specialised manner: water is sucked through the bill-tip, then expelled through grooves along the side of the bill, filtering out tiny invertebrates in the process. The Pink-eared Duck is not mistakeable for any other duck.
    Placed 75th in the challenge. Malacorhynchus membranaceus Anatidae The Pink-eared Duck is named after an insignificant spot of pink feathers on the side of the drake’s head. More striking are the bold black-and-white stripes which dominate the ducks’ neck, breast and underparts, giving rise to its vernacular name of Zebra Duck or Zebra Teal. Pink-eared Ducks have odd-shaped bills, evolved to feed in a specialised manner: water is sucked through the bill-tip, then expelled through grooves along the side of the bill, filtering out tiny invertebrates in the process. The Pink-eared Duck is not mistakeable for any other duck.
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC03967
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC03967
  • Submitted a challenge entry MUSK LORIKEET
    Glossopsitta concinna
Musk Lorikeet
The musk lorikeet is 22 centimetres (8.7 in) long. It is mainly green and it is identified by its red forehead, blue crown and a distinctive yellow band on its wing. Both upper and lower mandibles of the beak are red at the tip and darker near its base. The blue area on the crown of the female is smaller and paler than seen on the male
Musk lorikeets are found in eastern New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.[6] Range: uncommon nomad in woodlands and drier forests in south-east mainland, mainly west of divide, and TAS. The Musk Lorikeet have been sighted and are recent common visitors to fruit trees in the Punchbowl Area, near Launceston, Northern Tasmania. Favourite foods seem to include Apricots, Apples, Australian Native Bottlebrush flowers & Nectar, as well as seeds and nectar from Grevillea.
    Placed 45th in the challenge. Glossopsitta concinna Musk Lorikeet The musk lorikeet is 22 centimetres (8.7 in) long. It is mainly green and it is identified by its red forehead, blue crown and a distinctive yellow band on its wing. Both upper and lower mandibles of the beak are red at the tip and darker near its base. The blue area on the crown of the female is smaller and paler than seen on the male Musk lorikeets are found in eastern New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.[6] Range: uncommon nomad in woodlands and drier forests in south-east mainland, mainly west of divide, and TAS. The Musk Lorikeet have been sighted and are recent common visitors to fruit trees in the Punchbowl Area, near Launceston, Northern Tasmania. Favourite foods seem to include Apricots, Apples, Australian Native Bottlebrush flowers & Nectar, as well as seeds and nectar from Grevillea.
  • Submitted a challenge entry Beautiful Orchid
    Placed 68th in the challenge.
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    20170305_143813
  • Submitted a challenge entry Look what I see
    Young girl showing mum the butterfly she just found
    Placed 92nd in the challenge. Young girl showing mum the butterfly she just found
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC01054
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC01132
  • Submitted a challenge entry Lunch time for Aphids
    Placed 99th in the challenge.
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC01054
  • Submitted a challenge entry OLD GAWLER TOWN
    In 1837 Colonel William Light, Surveyor General for the Colony of South Australia camped twice in a local area that became known as ‘Dead Man’s Pass’ on the South Para river as part of his exploration of the Barossa Valley. Light recognised the potential of the location for South Australia’s first country township.
 In the second half of the 19th century Gawler boomed with the construction of public infrastructure such as rail and tramways, bridges, public baths, an Institute and a Town Hall. Industries such as flour mills, foundries, brickworks, manufacturing and retail outlets were established and expanded. This boom led to Gawler being considered the most industrialised town in Australia. Many of the buildings constructed during this period remain standing, providing Gawler with a unique and distinctive character.
    Placed 138th in the challenge. In 1837 Colonel William Light, Surveyor General for the Colony of South Australia camped twice in a local area that became known as ‘Dead Man’s Pass’ on the South Para river as part of his exploration of the Barossa Valley. Light recognised the potential of the location for South Australia’s first country township. In the second half of the 19th century Gawler boomed with the construction of public infrastructure such as rail and tramways, bridges, public baths, an Institute and a Town Hall. Industries such as flour mills, foundries, brickworks, manufacturing and retail outlets were established and expanded. This boom led to Gawler being considered the most industrialised town in Australia. Many of the buildings constructed during this period remain standing, providing Gawler with a unique and distinctive character.
  • Submitted a challenge entry RETRO ART IN OLD GAWLER TOWN
    In 1837 Colonel William Light, Surveyor General for the Colony of South Australia camped twice in a local area that became known as ‘Dead Man’s Pass’ on the South Para river as part of his exploration of the Barossa Valley. Light recognised the potential of the location for South Australia’s first country township.
 In the second half of the 19th century Gawler boomed with the construction of public infrastructure such as rail and tramways, bridges, public baths, an Institute and a Town Hall. Industries such as flour mills, foundries, brickworks, manufacturing and retail outlets were established and expanded. This boom led to Gawler being considered the most industrialised town in Australia. Many of the buildings constructed during this period remain standing, providing Gawler with a unique and distinctive character.
    Placed 131st in the challenge. In 1837 Colonel William Light, Surveyor General for the Colony of South Australia camped twice in a local area that became known as ‘Dead Man’s Pass’ on the South Para river as part of his exploration of the Barossa Valley. Light recognised the potential of the location for South Australia’s first country township. In the second half of the 19th century Gawler boomed with the construction of public infrastructure such as rail and tramways, bridges, public baths, an Institute and a Town Hall. Industries such as flour mills, foundries, brickworks, manufacturing and retail outlets were established and expanded. This boom led to Gawler being considered the most industrialised town in Australia. Many of the buildings constructed during this period remain standing, providing Gawler with a unique and distinctive character.
  • Submitted a challenge entry OLD GAWLER TOWN
    In 1837 Colonel William Light, Surveyor General for the Colony of South Australia camped twice in a local area that became known as ‘Dead Man’s Pass’ on the South Para river as part of his exploration of the Barossa Valley. Light recognised the potential of the location for South Australia’s first country township.
 In the second half of the 19th century Gawler boomed with the construction of public infrastructure such as rail and tramways, bridges, public baths, an Institute and a Town Hall. Industries such as flour mills, foundries, brickworks, manufacturing and retail outlets were established and expanded. This boom led to Gawler being considered the most industrialised town in Australia. Many of the buildings constructed during this period remain standing, providing Gawler with a unique and distinctive character.
    Placed 114th in the challenge. In 1837 Colonel William Light, Surveyor General for the Colony of South Australia camped twice in a local area that became known as ‘Dead Man’s Pass’ on the South Para river as part of his exploration of the Barossa Valley. Light recognised the potential of the location for South Australia’s first country township. In the second half of the 19th century Gawler boomed with the construction of public infrastructure such as rail and tramways, bridges, public baths, an Institute and a Town Hall. Industries such as flour mills, foundries, brickworks, manufacturing and retail outlets were established and expanded. This boom led to Gawler being considered the most industrialised town in Australia. Many of the buildings constructed during this period remain standing, providing Gawler with a unique and distinctive character.
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC00952a
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC00949a
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC00938a
  • Added 1 photo to their gallery
    DSC00568a
Activity older than 12 months is not displayed.
Total messages 1
Threads started 0
Last post 1 week ago
Total comments 1
Total likes 0
Last post 1 month ago
Total reviews 0
Entries 60
Votes cast 0
Last entry 2 weeks ago
Photos uploaded 133
Last upload 2 weeks ago