mandophoto

Lives in United States Tucson, AZ, United States
Joined on Feb 23, 2010

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DPR says "There may yet come a time when, finally, you don't absolutely need a bigger sensor for better results. And it's not necessarily a matter of 'if,' but a matter of 'when.'"

Yep.

It will not be surprising if camera manufacturers work more on the software side of their offerings. Like adapting the HEIF format and even opening their OS to third party developers. Ironically, stand alone digital cameras are more and more resembling the machines from a bygone era, film cameras. At least when compared to the communication options of smartphones.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2018 at 15:48 UTC as 116th comment
On article Annie Leibovitz teaches photography in new MasterClass (175 comments in total)

Creativity comes in many forms. I would think this is a good opportunity for anyone wanting to do the kind of work Ms. Leibovitz does. She is a master of the editorial/fashion field.

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2017 at 19:15 UTC as 48th comment
In reply to:

mandophoto: Considering the atomizing of filmmaking, the effort to research and or build a custom machine is probably better spent on creating. I’m guessing this iMac pro is targeted towards the folks who make a living from their YouTube work. The word “professional” is not a monolithic definition. A pro nowadays can be a one person vlogging operation or an editor working for Disney.

@ chriswy: For a one person operation everything is big.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 12:23 UTC

Considering the atomizing of filmmaking, the effort to research and or build a custom machine is probably better spent on creating. I’m guessing this iMac pro is targeted towards the folks who make a living from their YouTube work. The word “professional” is not a monolithic definition. A pro nowadays can be a one person vlogging operation or an editor working for Disney.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2017 at 11:15 UTC as 12th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

mandophoto: Using copyrighted work to create valid new work is not illegal or unethical. In fact, almost all photographers do it daily. Next time you compose an image with a poster, billboard, logo, etc., all of which are copyrighted or trademarked, think of the people who created that art and who holds the copyright. The images of the comedians were printed on flyers and distributed publicly. And he changed the original printed photographs enough to create valid new work. Legally and ethically he is on solid ground. His mistake was to misrepresent or perhaps even lie about his intended method of creating the work.

Using copyrighted and published work to create new work is not new and has been upheld in court many times. It happens in music, writing, photography, etc.

@ Justin Evidon: The problem is "Substantial alteration" is subjective and is usually left up to courts or a settlement.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh,_Pretty_Woman

Read the part: Lawsuit against 2 Live Crew

It is true that while Richard Prince and Sherrie Levine have successfully used other photographers works, Jeff Koons was initially found guilty of infringement and finally settled. It may be up to a court to decide what constitutes infringement, but fair use is not going away.

PS I'm a firm believer in copyright ownership yet as a photographer I'm well aware of the complications inherent, especially now as we become more aware of "rights," in composing a photograph.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 16:12 UTC

Using copyrighted work to create valid new work is not illegal or unethical. In fact, almost all photographers do it daily. Next time you compose an image with a poster, billboard, logo, etc., all of which are copyrighted or trademarked, think of the people who created that art and who holds the copyright. The images of the comedians were printed on flyers and distributed publicly. And he changed the original printed photographs enough to create valid new work. Legally and ethically he is on solid ground. His mistake was to misrepresent or perhaps even lie about his intended method of creating the work.

Using copyrighted and published work to create new work is not new and has been upheld in court many times. It happens in music, writing, photography, etc.

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2017 at 14:30 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies

You can bet the executives of other camera brands are jealously wondering how they can achieve Leica's success. Perhaps they can take a page from the Japanese car industry like when Toyota created the Lexus brand and Honda the Acura brand.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2017 at 23:50 UTC as 48th comment | 3 replies
On article Gear of the Year 2017 - Richard's choice: Sony NP-FZ100 (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Miki Nemeth: Oh, I am the first to comment, how cool. This morning this was my exact feeling, after using my A9 on a single battery for a week or so, I can say, I fully understand your choice. Originally, I was quite suspicious to handle another kind of battery. I hate what Nikon does, for each and every camera they invent a new battery.

....yep. Same battery in the D750, D600, D610, and others.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2017 at 14:34 UTC

Well, Nikon should advertise the fact that they still sell film cameras. The pro F6 and the slimmed down Fm10.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/film-cameras/index.page

EDIT: OKay, those cameras are, to use Nikon verbiage: Temporarily out of inventory.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2017 at 13:22 UTC as 47th comment
In reply to:

RStyga: Right...

"A lot of Leica rangefinders' appeal comes down to the quality of construction."
There is no such appeal but myth. Leica cameras are not better constructed than high-end DSLM cameras, say from Fujifilm or Olympus. Full stop. On the contrary, they are occasionally riddled with issues and design flaws. Leica has demonstrably poor know-how in the digital age, yes!

"The whole process of taking someone's picture is less confrontational than it might be with a larger and louder camera."
Is Barnes living in past decades or something? The vast majority of DSLM cameras today are smaller and lighter, thus less intrusive, than Leica bricks, and - because they have AF - take photos much faster thus the subject feels for much less time being under the spotlight.

@proxy: Ha! Anthropomorphism is always amusing. The Sony is big mostly because of the amount of glass it has inside.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2017 at 14:31 UTC
In reply to:

RStyga: Right...

"A lot of Leica rangefinders' appeal comes down to the quality of construction."
There is no such appeal but myth. Leica cameras are not better constructed than high-end DSLM cameras, say from Fujifilm or Olympus. Full stop. On the contrary, they are occasionally riddled with issues and design flaws. Leica has demonstrably poor know-how in the digital age, yes!

"The whole process of taking someone's picture is less confrontational than it might be with a larger and louder camera."
Is Barnes living in past decades or something? The vast majority of DSLM cameras today are smaller and lighter, thus less intrusive, than Leica bricks, and - because they have AF - take photos much faster thus the subject feels for much less time being under the spotlight.

@RStyga: No question that Leica has had problems with the digital M cameras though that era seems to be behind it. But as for size, lets compare "full frame" cameras. The M10 weighs the same as the Sony a9 and a7rIII, and if we include lenses, then.... The Sony 50mm f1.4 is gigantic while the Summilux is tiny in comparison. And no matter how light and small a camera is, without a lens it is, well, a cosmetic addition to your desk.

I've used rangefinder cameras and know using them quickly and accurately is possible with practice. And as an owner of an Sony a6500, I've learned to be careful with auto focus when light levels drop. AF can be good but it is not perfect.

And as for the cost, well, who are we all to dictate how someone should spend their money.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2017 at 13:56 UTC
In reply to:

HotPixie: "A lens mount designed around the assumption that you'd never need to change aperture while taking a shot."

Can you expand on this? What's the mechanism that gives difficulties and how does it differ from other mounts? Thanks

Yes, my D750 can change aperture settings in live view but it is noisy. Obviously the mechanical aperture linkage between camera and lens was designed long before the advent of using still cameras for video. There may also be issues with vibration (I don't do video so it's speculation.)

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2017 at 14:07 UTC
On article Canon G1 X III vs. Sony Cybershot RX100 V (634 comments in total)
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: 1"" sensor vs. APSC sensor???
NO WAY!

It's the differences that make the comparison interesting. That's the point. For instance, which one is more pocketable?

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2017 at 13:32 UTC

The second to last paragraph is a bit unnerving, but considering the size of not only still photography raw files which are only going to get larger, and 4K+ video files, how will adjustments to huge photo and video files be managed over an internet connection?

Perhaps Adobe has something else planned but since a fast working environment is a necessity for many image makers, I doubt pro desktop applications will become solely cloud based.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 13:58 UTC as 314th comment | 1 reply
On article iPhone 8 Plus sample gallery (203 comments in total)

These photos were converted from HEIF to JPG, right?

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2017 at 16:13 UTC as 50th comment | 3 replies

The most interesting part was how the photographer reverted to being a joyous kid who's been handed their first bicycle, or their first smartphone.

Actually it was good to see that even a seasoned pro using the latest digital gear can be surprised, have anxiety, hope and doubt.

Link | Posted on Sep 25, 2017 at 14:00 UTC as 48th comment

Considering the obvious difference in ethnicity of the people in this photograph, I would not be surprised if politics becomes attached to it. Yet the race differences does give a narrative of a united America, after all.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 15:33 UTC as 11th comment | 6 replies

The photo of the girl by Wenmei Hill is lovely. That Petzval lens is surprisingly good.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 13:25 UTC as 45th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Marty4650: If there is any bias here then it is economic, and not racial. B&H has a "bias towards making profits and staying in business."

ALL well run companies hire the best candidates who are willing to work for the least pay. This isn't racism.... it is capitalism. If those workers happen to be Hispanic, then that wasn't because B&H wants to exploit them. It is because they are the best workers who are willing to work for the least pay.

Amazon, Walmart, Target, UPS, Toyota and everyone else does the exact same thing. But since they aren't owned by "religious Jews" no one seems to notice it or have a problem with it.

The only employer who doesn't hire the best people willing to work for the least salary is the U.S. Post Office. And this might explain why they are constantly losing money, and why FedEx and UPS are thriving.

@Marty4650
What is it about harassment, unequal pay, and denial of promotion that you don't understand? Obviously the Hispanic workers were NOT willing to work under those circumstances. You are in effect saying that B&H practiced bigotry in it's hiring, which is exactly why the Department of Labor sued the company.

Both Amazon and UPS have also been sued by warehouse workers.

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2017 at 13:24 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: "When she spoke with The New York Times early last year, Sherman said that social media

"seems so vulgar" to her, but the draw of Instagram was too much

. Several months later she launched a private account, and this weekend she finally opened it up for everyone to see."

i think this quote says much more about miss sherman than Instagram

edit: i know of Cindy Sherman thru her photo still appropriations ...and she had for me the mythos of a very popular artist

after my Instagram visit i can only say the back of my mind reservation about the value of her opus ... has moved forward and she seems all the more banal and publicity seeking than many without her fame .... she seems now much more plain and unextraordinary to me now . ...............................

im sure her average photo of a slime covered Salsbury steak and mashed is meant to be ironic , or funny but its only made me wonder for her sanity

@cosinaphile: Vulgarity comes in many forms, and as part of the social media phenomenon DPReview is not exempt (forum posts and comments,) yet you have a presence here. Yes, Instagram is gigantic as is YouTube and others. But would you rather have the vulgar oppression of a Kim Jong-un, or take freedom of speech even with all it's tangential twists.

Cindy Sherman is not the first "major" artist to delve into digital social media. Also, self-agrendizing and marketing in the "high" arts is fairly common, just look at classical music. Singling Ms. Sherman because she voiced an opinion then changed it seems petty, a form of vulgarity also?

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 12:26 UTC
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