Marcus Beard

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Joined on May 10, 2002

Comments

Total: 27, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »
On article Meet two nomadic photographers who travel full-time (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marcus Beard: Very interesting to read the predominantly negative comments here. I respect what Elia has done enormously - he has achieved huge popularity and a viable business form doing what he clearly loves. His processing and perfecting 'picture postcard' images is impressive. His exposure blending technique is impressive. But yes - many of the replies here make a good point - there is little exploration evident in the work. It is clearly the intention to make the best image possible from an iconic and recognisable viewpoint. There is very little soul to these images so as a travel series they don't stack up well in some ways. I wonder as Elia continues with his journey he will begin to explore less well know locations - as it will be difficult to continue in the same vein indefinitely.

It's quite funny having watched the video now - The locations they've visited in Japan are rammed with tourists so are as far as you can get from serene as described in the video. Try Kamakura for lovely peaceful temples off the beaten track.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 18:54 UTC
On article Meet two nomadic photographers who travel full-time (151 comments in total)

Very interesting to read the predominantly negative comments here. I respect what Elia has done enormously - he has achieved huge popularity and a viable business form doing what he clearly loves. His processing and perfecting 'picture postcard' images is impressive. His exposure blending technique is impressive. But yes - many of the replies here make a good point - there is little exploration evident in the work. It is clearly the intention to make the best image possible from an iconic and recognisable viewpoint. There is very little soul to these images so as a travel series they don't stack up well in some ways. I wonder as Elia continues with his journey he will begin to explore less well know locations - as it will be difficult to continue in the same vein indefinitely.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 17:25 UTC as 37th comment | 1 reply

Makes Canon's superb TSE lenses look like a complete bargain!

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2016 at 09:01 UTC as 28th comment | 1 reply
On article Sand and sky: Photographing Morocco (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

nsng: Morocco is a fascinating country for photographers. The medinas of Marrakech and Fez with their labyrinths of narrow streets and lanes are a photographer's delight. But many of the people are reluctant to be photographed and at times can even get aggressive. What I loved is the Sahara desert with the undulating sand dunes and in b&w can be surreal. Here is the album with some images from my trip to Morocco in May 2015, http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/9320079530/albums/morocco

Interesting. I don't know why the change BUT I have a similar experience albeit in a different part of the world.

In Hong Kong, the more elderly people tend to not like having the photographs taken - and I have had some moderate hostility in this regard. This is with a digital Fuji XE-1 or Canon DSLR. However, when I tried with an ancient FILM Rolleicord the same people were not bothered at all. Maybe it's a perception of what happens to digital images (sharing, internet etc) that is the difference as compared with film?

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 16:50 UTC
On article Sand and sky: Photographing Morocco (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

nsng: Morocco is a fascinating country for photographers. The medinas of Marrakech and Fez with their labyrinths of narrow streets and lanes are a photographer's delight. But many of the people are reluctant to be photographed and at times can even get aggressive. What I loved is the Sahara desert with the undulating sand dunes and in b&w can be surreal. Here is the album with some images from my trip to Morocco in May 2015, http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/9320079530/albums/morocco

Yes I agree. I've been lucky enough to have a few short business trips to Marrakech and found it very hard to photograph without being accosted. Firstly, I had been with a DSLR and found people very hostile to me as a photographer - even though I was doing what I could to act respectfully. Returning with a Fuji XE1 I found it easier - but by no means straight forward. Beautiful place though full of colour and life.

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2016 at 04:52 UTC
On article SmugMug Films: Passport to Morocco (48 comments in total)

I read the comments here with interest. I'm not a big fan of Trey's photography - but one has to admire how he has marketed what he does so successfully. Any yes - it is becoming a little tiresome to here repeated faux philosophy. I'd recommend seeing the truly amazing National Geographic photographers Proof videos though - a different league. https://youtu.be/6tVlMaBNkpg

Link | Posted on May 14, 2016 at 16:12 UTC as 17th comment | 3 replies

Very interesting read - particularly for those of us with a Japanese wife and living with the perpetual conflict of whether to continue working in the UK in a salaryman type job or give it all up and go to Japan for something different. (Harder when you don't speak Japanese like me....)

Some very beautiful images here - and what I find most interesting is the way the photographer sees Japan from a non-Japanese perspective. I love the contra light shots in particular. Resonates with me - I wish I had this level of talent!

Thanks

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2016 at 14:07 UTC as 30th comment | 4 replies

This doesn't solve the main problem which is the non-destructive edits that most of us Aperture users have done over several years and tens of thousands of images. Fingers crossed that Photos.app will allow this

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2014 at 20:56 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Marcus Beard: Lovely to see.

Some good, and some great images. Personally I think the B&W blue shark is stunning, and the gnat deservedly chosen for a fresh take on such a subject, and the gannets shot is simply beautiful and well executed. I personally find the no. 1 and 2 shots quite well executed but not that interesting. No. 4 is an interesting subject but a bit lacking in interest and technical execution.

But that's the beauty of photography - beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Subjective as I say; for me the shark image from above IS great. Pure nature as art.

Link | Posted on Sep 4, 2014 at 14:30 UTC

Lovely to see.

Some good, and some great images. Personally I think the B&W blue shark is stunning, and the gnat deservedly chosen for a fresh take on such a subject, and the gannets shot is simply beautiful and well executed. I personally find the no. 1 and 2 shots quite well executed but not that interesting. No. 4 is an interesting subject but a bit lacking in interest and technical execution.

But that's the beauty of photography - beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Link | Posted on Sep 4, 2014 at 13:16 UTC as 31st comment | 3 replies
On article Apple to cease development of Aperture (425 comments in total)

Oh no! I've been the optimist hanging in there for ages. I'm really disappointed. Having tens of thousands of photos beautifully managed, tagged, in Smart Albums etc for years. Seems to have been rather a waste of time. Very upset indeed and not impressed with Apple.

I need to think of a sensible strategy from here on. I knew it was risky relying on managed photo storage in a proprietary piece of software but still - annoying in the extreme.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 18:20 UTC as 138th comment | 1 reply
On article Behind the Shot: Lost in Space (89 comments in total)

I really like this article - can't understand all the hate. Would be much easier to create such an image with a tilt shift lens (using the shift then stitching undistorted panoramas). In fact it's inspired me to try

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2013 at 17:53 UTC as 25th comment | 3 replies

Fairly interesting but is a good demonstration of the subjective nature of the "art" in photography. I'd have deleted these shots had I taken them!

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 10:16 UTC as 92nd comment | 5 replies

Pretentious nonsense. There are millions (literally I expect) of amateur photographers who take vastly more interesting pictures in my opinion. I'd have deleted some of these if I'd taken them.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2013 at 19:31 UTC as 102nd comment | 5 replies
On article Time magazine showcases Top 10 photos of 2012 (147 comments in total)

Unlike many others I think there are some wonderful provocative images here. I do agree though that the themes are a little narrow. I'm a Brit and we had some pretty spectacular positive stuff going on here this year - anyone remember the Olympic Games or the Jubilee?

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2012 at 09:29 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply

I use Hipstamatic more than any other camera app on my iPhone 4 due to the quality of the results. I find it hard to achieve a similar look by post processing normal Camera app pictures, plus there is still an element of fun in seeing what the image turns out like. The new multiple exposure feature is a lot of fun - but quite hard to get good results with (although this is probably due to my lack of skill).

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 19:16 UTC as 3rd comment

I've no experience at all in using a TS lens but this intrigues me. I've often thought about the wonderful Canon TSE lenses but they are WAY out of my budget. If this gets good reviews and the price is right it could well be my next lens!

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2012 at 14:39 UTC as 50th comment
In reply to:

Light Pilgrim: I think these Zeiss lenses are not relevant anymore. They do not work properly with modern DSLRs and Manual Focusing is extremely complex on bodies like 5D MKIII as an example.

I think Canon will introduce 135 F/2 very soon and it will have AF...will be cheaper. The existing Canon lens is just stunning and is costs 50% of what Zeiss is asking for this lens.

I think Zeiss will need to change their business model very soon....of offer AF.

Have you tried to manually focus with a Zeiss lens? It is far from complex - turn (beautifully weighted) focus ring, job done. You can of course even use focus confirmation lights and beeps if you want to "check" that you've done it right. I use a manual focus 35mm all the time and love it

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2012 at 14:37 UTC
In reply to:

liquid stereo: How do people manual focus? I can't imagine doing it with the default finder/focusing-screen.

Manual focus is pretty easy - I have a Zeiss 35mm and manually focus comfortably at F/2. In fact it's my default walk around lens.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2012 at 14:35 UTC
Total: 27, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »