aftab

aftab

Lives in New Zealand (Aotearoa) Thames, New Zealand (Aotearoa)
Works as a Doctor
Joined on Sep 27, 2005

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Total: 353, showing: 1 – 20
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Talking about brands, brand reputation matters, no matter how illogical it may sound to many.
"…… That brand strength can be seen in consumer perceptions. According to YouGov BrandIndex, Canon comes fourth in a list of 36 ‘computing and home office’ brands with an index score of 23.4 (index being a balance of a range of metrics including value, quality and satisfaction). It is also in the top five for impression, quality, value and recommendation.
And the Reputation Institute has Canon at fourth in its global ranking of brand reputation, with a score of 77.4 putting it behind just Rolex, Lego and Google."

https://www.marketingweek.com/2018/05/11/canon-reframing-disruption/

Canon is ahead of Apple, Microsoft and Samsung, forget Sony, Fuji, Nikon or any other DPR or forum favorite.

Link | Posted on May 16, 2018 at 11:33 UTC as 57th comment | 4 replies
On article Opinion: the Sony a7 III could be the new Nikon D750 (1232 comments in total)
In reply to:

aftab: Looking at the body price only can be a bit misleading.
Let's add a commonly used lens, 24-70/2.8.
At B&H A7III + 24-70/2.8 GM = 4200 USD
D750+ 24-70/2.8 (non VR)= 3600 USD
For those who don't need video, A7III is quite expensive compared to D750. D750 is an extremely popular camera. I am sure A7III will be very popular too. But I doubt it will be as popular as it's Nikon counterpart, because price matters, lens collection matters, reputation matters, photographer matters, weather sealing matters, battery life matters and OVF and larger size (and ergonomics) matters to many.
(just a thought from a Canon user)

@ thxbb12, That's not a fair analogy. With any modern camera one can AF on eye. The difference here is that in one case photographer auto focuses on eye and in another case photographer lets the camera do it. I am sure in 99% of the cases it won't make any difference. It's not the same as the difference between AF and manual focus where the difference is huge.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 10:10 UTC
On article Opinion: the Sony a7 III could be the new Nikon D750 (1232 comments in total)
In reply to:

aftab: Looking at the body price only can be a bit misleading.
Let's add a commonly used lens, 24-70/2.8.
At B&H A7III + 24-70/2.8 GM = 4200 USD
D750+ 24-70/2.8 (non VR)= 3600 USD
For those who don't need video, A7III is quite expensive compared to D750. D750 is an extremely popular camera. I am sure A7III will be very popular too. But I doubt it will be as popular as it's Nikon counterpart, because price matters, lens collection matters, reputation matters, photographer matters, weather sealing matters, battery life matters and OVF and larger size (and ergonomics) matters to many.
(just a thought from a Canon user)

I am sure face/eye AF is useful and absence of this feature can be a deal breaker for some. But thousands (maybe millions) of photographers for decades didn't think they needed automatic AF for face or eye. They just did it without any real issue. Similarly greater spread of AF can be useful for some. But what is the point of having 693 AF points if you can't see them or select them individually? They can be useful for tracking, I know. But Nikon is excellent in tracking. And do we really need more than 70 or 80% of AF area coverage? At the end one has to decide which features outweigh others. I am sure Sony will attract many. But my feeling is that for more than 90% of photographers cost (lens plus camera), lens collection and brand reputation etc matter more than IBIS or eye AF etc. After all, both cameras have similar IQ which is the bottom line.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 07:59 UTC
On article Opinion: the Sony a7 III could be the new Nikon D750 (1232 comments in total)

Looking at the body price only can be a bit misleading.
Let's add a commonly used lens, 24-70/2.8.
At B&H A7III + 24-70/2.8 GM = 4200 USD
D750+ 24-70/2.8 (non VR)= 3600 USD
For those who don't need video, A7III is quite expensive compared to D750. D750 is an extremely popular camera. I am sure A7III will be very popular too. But I doubt it will be as popular as it's Nikon counterpart, because price matters, lens collection matters, reputation matters, photographer matters, weather sealing matters, battery life matters and OVF and larger size (and ergonomics) matters to many.
(just a thought from a Canon user)

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 06:35 UTC as 99th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

aftab: In 2011, 2.9 million units of mirrorless were sold. This increased to 4 million units in 2012. In 2012 IDC made a bold prediction: in 2014, 13 million mirrorless will be sold. This prediction was a failure. Mirrorless sale per year remained around 4 million units since then. Contrary to popular belief, mirrorless sale is not increasing in absolute numbers, its is increasing as a percent of total ILC sale as DSLR sale is falling. There is good indication that decline in DSLR sale is stabilizing . It is highly likely that DSLR sale will stabilize around 8 million units per year and mirrorless around 4-5 million units. This is the likely scenario in next 2-3 years. What will happen after this is anybody's guess. Why mirrorless sale has remained stagnant in last 5-6 years? Maybe because technology was still immature or because Canon and Nikon haven't been serious with it. But it is also possible that despite all innovations most people are not convinced with mirrorless.

A myth is often propagated that younger generation will lean towards mirrorless as they are coming from cellphone and never experienced OVF. In reality, APSC DSLRs overwhelmingly outsell entry to mid-level mirrorless. Most of these buyers must be younger generation. Why is this generation not automatically attracted towards mirrorless? It is because, when young cellphone users want to get serious about photography, they automatically think Canon or Nikon. They don’t care about OVF vs EVF. For them seriousness means Canon or Nikon.
Despite all the forum clamor, Sony market share has remained around 12-14%, Fuji, Olympus and Panasonic have single digit share. Only Canon and Nikon can push the market towards mirrorless. Will they or when will they?
Hard to tell.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2018 at 12:19 UTC

In 2011, 2.9 million units of mirrorless were sold. This increased to 4 million units in 2012. In 2012 IDC made a bold prediction: in 2014, 13 million mirrorless will be sold. This prediction was a failure. Mirrorless sale per year remained around 4 million units since then. Contrary to popular belief, mirrorless sale is not increasing in absolute numbers, its is increasing as a percent of total ILC sale as DSLR sale is falling. There is good indication that decline in DSLR sale is stabilizing . It is highly likely that DSLR sale will stabilize around 8 million units per year and mirrorless around 4-5 million units. This is the likely scenario in next 2-3 years. What will happen after this is anybody's guess. Why mirrorless sale has remained stagnant in last 5-6 years? Maybe because technology was still immature or because Canon and Nikon haven't been serious with it. But it is also possible that despite all innovations most people are not convinced with mirrorless.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2018 at 12:18 UTC as 134th comment | 32 replies
In reply to:

Mastering Light: Wow there is a lot of delusional posts.

The fact is a good percentage of ILC users prefer an OVF over a "digital" looking EVF and can use the LCD anytime they want.
EVF fans can say what they want but they can 'tchange people's minds.
.
And even if their market share drops to 40% (it is well over 50% currently), they are only two major players. Mirrorless has 5 major players and Canon without trying is #2 ahead of Sony in some markets.

So in a few years it will be more of the same. Canon will have 50% of the ILC market, Sony will have 12-14 (that has not changed for 10 years). Canon will offer buyers the choice of an EVF or OVF and Sony will not. There will be a lot of mirrorless camera makers (Fuji, Canon, Nikon, Panasonic, Olympus and Sony) fighting for 45-50% of the ILC market and Nikon, Canon and Pentax fighting for 50-55% of the market.

In 5 years most pros will still use DSLRs and a tiny few will still fight to use film.

Sony alpha III is not available at Amazon or B&H yet. Those rankings are not valid.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2018 at 03:11 UTC
In reply to:

aftab: I don't think FF mirrorless will be a norm in near future. A larger camera body, say 6D or D610 size or even 5D/D800 size, remains an advantage over smaller bodies to use with larger FF lenses. A smaller number of FF users who mostly uses ultra-wide or wide lenses will benefit from smaller bodies. With larger body one can have larger battery. A larger body will also be an advantage when 6K comes out or even with 4K for heat management. Mirrorless do offer advantages other than size, but I doubt that most FF DSLR users actually want them or want them badly enough to go for smaller FF bodies. Sometime in future mirrorless probably will become a norm, but I doubt that it will happen in next few years. It will only happen if Canon and Nikon decide to replace their popular FF cameras with mirrorless. Unlikely, I would say.

osv, you are right, mirrorless simply means no mirror. But with mirrorless one can make smaller cameras. And a lot of people like smaller cameras, as you mentioned 'most people don't want to carry a brick around all day'. That's why mirrorless has become synonymous with smaller bodies and that's why Sony FF mirrorless cameras are smaller than their DSLR counterparts. It is entirely possible that Canon and Nikon will produce FF mirrorless with larger than Sony bodies to continue with their current ergonomics, larger battery etc. We will see.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 23:22 UTC

I don't think FF mirrorless will be a norm in near future. A larger camera body, say 6D or D610 size or even 5D/D800 size, remains an advantage over smaller bodies to use with larger FF lenses. A smaller number of FF users who mostly uses ultra-wide or wide lenses will benefit from smaller bodies. With larger body one can have larger battery. A larger body will also be an advantage when 6K comes out or even with 4K for heat management. Mirrorless do offer advantages other than size, but I doubt that most FF DSLR users actually want them or want them badly enough to go for smaller FF bodies. Sometime in future mirrorless probably will become a norm, but I doubt that it will happen in next few years. It will only happen if Canon and Nikon decide to replace their popular FF cameras with mirrorless. Unlikely, I would say.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 22:05 UTC as 207th comment | 9 replies

Canon's financial report:
"Next, compact cameras.
In 2017, the market shrank by 10% to 13.5 million units, while our sales were flat at 4.04 million. In 2018, we expect the market to shrink by 19% to 11 million units. Within this, we expect our sale to decline 16% to 3.4 million. "
Canon's 2018 projection for total ILC sale is also 11 million units, same as compact. It is interesting that people bought more compact than ILC for so many years despite smartphone onslaught.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 10:11 UTC as 42nd comment
In reply to:

Iloveaircraftnoise: All the technology in the world ain't going to replace the experience of composing through an optical viewfinder.
Long live the mirror.

Canon's financial report:
"Next, compact cameras.
In 2017, the market shrank by 10% to 13.5 million units, while our sales were flat at 4.04 million. In 2018, we expect the market to shrink by 19% to 11 million units. Within this, we expect our sale to decline 16% to 3.4 million. "
Canon's 2018 projection for total ILC sale is also 11 million units, same as compact. It is interesting that people bought more compact than ILC for so many years despite smartphone onslaught.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 10:05 UTC
On article Quick look: Canon's new compressed Raw format (241 comments in total)

Some here are a bit confused with names. Canon's first RAW format was CRW. This was replaced by CR2. Some cameras have smaller version of the RAW called MRAW ans SRAW. M and S versions had reduced pixel dimensions. For example for 5DsR, 'normal' RAW is 8688x5792, MRAW 6480x4320 and SRAW 4320x2880. With M50 Canon has replaced CR2 with CR3. Canon is calling it the next generation RAW format. In this format one has the option of 'normal' RAW as in CR2. But one also has the option of C-RAW or compact RAW. C-RAW replaces M and SRAW. C-RAW file size is 30 to 40% smaller than 'normal' RAW, but unlike previous MRAW and SRAW files, pixel dimensions remain same as usual RAW files. So, with M50 and CR3 one has the option of shooting 'normal' RAW or C-RAW.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 00:12 UTC as 31st comment | 2 replies
On article Canon EOS M50 sample gallery (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

snapa: After viewing the first picture and looking at the trees in the background, I immediately dismissed this camera. There is nothing sharp enough in that picture that would even remotely make me think of getting this camera. Then, I checked out a few more pictures and they only got worse, what a waste of R&D and resources.

I'd rather use my Pixel 2 that would give me much better landscapes than this. I was hoping Canon would have come out with a much better camera than this, but they simply did not, IMO.

snapa, an ILC camera almost never produces soft images. Softness usually can be attributed to lens, technique (not an issue here), environmental haze, unusually strong AA filter (rare or non existent) etc.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2018 at 06:40 UTC
On article Canon EOS M50 sample gallery (195 comments in total)

OOC JPEGs look really soft compared to RAW converted JPEGs. I wonder if things will improve by turning off in camera NR.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 23:22 UTC as 32nd comment
In reply to:

Fog Maker: Canon has lost the younger crowd. And when they finally wake up, that same crowd will be too invested in other systems to even bother - much like many older Canon shooters today won’t switch.

Fog Maker, what you said about newer generation upgrading to semi pro cameras is logical. But look at it from two other perspectives. Canon, Nikon and Sony sell significantly more entry level cameras. Most of these buyers are upgrading from either P&S (not many left) or smartphone. So, one can argue that younger generation is mostly buying entry level cameras. You can also look at vloggers, very popular among younger generation. Overwhelming majority of vloggers use Canons (70 D, 80D, G7X etc). People who follow them are likely to buy cameras they use. Last point; money is an important consideration for many especially young people. Under 1000 USD, they can buy a DSLR, a kit lens and a 1.8 lens. This combo can take their photography to next level.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 02:43 UTC
In reply to:

Fog Maker: Canon has lost the younger crowd. And when they finally wake up, that same crowd will be too invested in other systems to even bother - much like many older Canon shooters today won’t switch.

MikeStern, I didn't confuse anything. No where I said, better sales figures mean better camera. Sales figures simply reflect people's buying preferences.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 02:22 UTC
In reply to:

aftab: A lot of people want high end mirrorless from Canon. But from Canon's perspective it's not an interesting proposition yet. Since 2013 about 4 million MILCs have been sold every year. The number hasn't changed significantly and FF MILC occupies a small portion of this market. That's why there was not a single FF MILC in top 50 ILCs in Japanese market in February (and poor 6DII was the top selling FF ILC). Impatient folks may not like what Canon is doing, but from Canon's perspective it makes perfect sense to capture the lower end market first and then move from there. DSLRs still outsell mirrorless by 2:1, ratio for FF DSLR would be much higher. All these may change as MILCs continues to mature. People often forget that the whole camera market is under tremendous pressure from smartphone. And newer generation moving up from smartphone are more likely to buy entry level mirrorless (or DSLR) than mid range or high end ILC where DSLR dominance is overwhelming.

osv, You are right about plummeting DSLR sales and it is expected to drop even more this year. On the other hand it is also true that mirrorless sales (worldwide, not just Japan) remained static for last 6 years. We really don't know what will happen in next few years, but at least till last year worldwide twice the number of DSLRs were sold compared to mirrorless. I mentioned Japan because that is the only country where you get monthly sales figures. In March there is one FF mirrorless in top 50, A7II at 46th position. Remember Japan market has been more favorable to mirrorless compared to Europe or America and it's camera market is about 13% world market. In 2012 reputable IDC predicted that in 2014 13 millions mirrorless will be sold, in reality mirrorless sales didn't increase since 2012 (roughly 4 millions every year). If DSLR sales drop to 4 million in few years market share will be fifty fifty. I am not in denial osv. I look beyond forums and look at solid data if available.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 02:14 UTC
In reply to:

Fog Maker: Canon has lost the younger crowd. And when they finally wake up, that same crowd will be too invested in other systems to even bother - much like many older Canon shooters today won’t switch.

I agree that Canon threw away video advantage in ILCs.
But I don't think they have lost any (or minimum) advantage with younger generation if we agree that younger generation is more likely to buy entry level cameras. Canon is #2 in mirrorless by selling entry level cameras. It is most likely that for DSLR entry level Canon is #1 (or #2).
We don't have numbers for younger crowd, we are just guessing. The best guess, would be that Canon is still #1 with younger crowd.
I know you are a Canon shooter and your frustration with Canon is genuine.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 00:33 UTC
In reply to:

Fog Maker: Canon has lost the younger crowd. And when they finally wake up, that same crowd will be too invested in other systems to even bother - much like many older Canon shooters today won’t switch.

"Canon has lost the younger crowd."
How do you know this?

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 00:02 UTC
In reply to:

netudiant: It may be that no one asked, but the absence of any comment regarding their efforts in the fixed lens segment suggests that Canon is close to exiting that space.
Even though Sony is doing pretty well by all accounts with high end bridge cameras exemplified by the RX10IV, Canon won't upgrade the GX3. Fear of self cannibalization again?

No, Canon has no plan to exit this segment. Last year Canon released more cameras in fixed lens (P&S) segment. They plan to release more this year as was mentioned in their financial report.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2018 at 23:05 UTC
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