Klaus dk

Klaus dk

Lives in Denmark Virum, Denmark
Works as a IT developer
Joined on Oct 6, 2006
About me:

To protect my pictures from unsolicited editing, I have removed all references to my work.

Comments

Total: 61, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Flashpoint Budget Studio Monolight Review (45 comments in total)
In reply to:

Klaus dk: Frequently questions about creating a small, low budget, home studio for portraits are asked on the forums, so the idea of testing entry level strobes is really good.

Usually, strobes are recommended for portrait photography because they provide power, speed and low heat dissipation, things that are irrelevant for product photography. It is generally accepted that continuous lights are cheaper and better for product photography because the photographer can immediately see the results of every little change in the lighting.

Why then, would DPR choose a reviewer, who shoots products and does not care for portraits, for this review?

The resulting review suffers from this, since two severe shortcomings of these strobes in portrait photography are not mentioned: the unability to mount modifiers other than those with a shaft, and the very narrow power variability of the strobes. A 300 Ws strobe used as a main will necessitate a narrow aperture and give no room for using DoF creatively.

Mike,
Since I have strobes, I also now and then use them for product photography, but a low budget solution for product photography would most probably be based on CFLs, LEDs or incadescents.

As for portrait photography, you failed to mention the consequences of the limited selection of modifiers and of the limited power range (DoF control).

You cannot expect beginners to anticipate such problems, so in a review targeting entry level photographers, mentioning them is even more relevant.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 14:36 UTC
On article Flashpoint Budget Studio Monolight Review (45 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: There are a couple of important things missing from this review.

For instance, a 75W modeling lamp sounds useless for portrait work. Was it?

How do you -- or can you -- attach a softbox or any light modifier other than the umbrella?

luigibozi: Perhaps, but any Profoto modifier will be more expensive than the kit, so a strobe with a Bowens S-mount and cheap modifiers would be a better solution.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 13:41 UTC
On article Flashpoint Budget Studio Monolight Review (45 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: There are a couple of important things missing from this review.

For instance, a 75W modeling lamp sounds useless for portrait work. Was it?

How do you -- or can you -- attach a softbox or any light modifier other than the umbrella?

MarshallG: the speedring only fits flashpoint monolights of type II and DG, it will not fit these.

The problem with these lights is that only modifiers with a shaft will fit, beauty dishes, snoots and softboxes of even moderate weight needing a speedring will not.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 09:56 UTC
On article Flashpoint Budget Studio Monolight Review (45 comments in total)

Frequently questions about creating a small, low budget, home studio for portraits are asked on the forums, so the idea of testing entry level strobes is really good.

Usually, strobes are recommended for portrait photography because they provide power, speed and low heat dissipation, things that are irrelevant for product photography. It is generally accepted that continuous lights are cheaper and better for product photography because the photographer can immediately see the results of every little change in the lighting.

Why then, would DPR choose a reviewer, who shoots products and does not care for portraits, for this review?

The resulting review suffers from this, since two severe shortcomings of these strobes in portrait photography are not mentioned: the unability to mount modifiers other than those with a shaft, and the very narrow power variability of the strobes. A 300 Ws strobe used as a main will necessitate a narrow aperture and give no room for using DoF creatively.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 09:47 UTC as 9th comment | 3 replies
On article Flashpoint Budget Studio Monolight Review (45 comments in total)
In reply to:

electrophoto: Quote: "While portraits are not my thing (I like product photography because the subjects don't speak or have opinions)"

Thanks... that made my day!

Since portrait photography is one of the main applications for strobes, it might have been a good idea to have someone who was actually interested in this genre to do the review.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 08:54 UTC
On photo Vinyls in the Macro - Repeating Pattern challenge (1 comment in total)

this is more than 1 m across and could hardly be a macro, not even a cropped closeup?

Link | Posted on May 27, 2014 at 10:05 UTC as 1st comment
On GalleryItem:2897457 (1 comment in total)

Sigma 50-150 mm f/2.8 APO OS DC HSM

Posted on Apr 16, 2014 at 22:11 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

PeterBM: Please, can it tilt downward to shoot above heads ?

If you turn it upside-down, you will be able to shoot above heads using the tilted screen. No need to make it more complicated.
Selfies is another problem.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 09:33 UTC
On article Happy Holidays from dpreview (106 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nikonworks: Blending the major holidays of some of the world's major religions by wishing people 'Happy Holidays' or 'Season's Greeting' is to miinimize the impotance of each holiday.
-
Here at DPReview you have more than enough space to say Merry Christmas, happy Channukah, Happy Kwanza, o any other holiday at this time of the year.

A Christmas Fly is supposed to be a sign of good luck. Unfortunately this one just hit the ointment. So happy Nikon overexposure to you too my friend :-)
- And to the good staff at dpreview: Happy whatever to you and thank you for your great contributions to our enlightenment in the past year.

Link | Posted on Dec 25, 2012 at 14:46 UTC
On article Breaking the Rules (142 comments in total)

This is one of the best articles about photography I have ever read. It both acknowledges the reasons for learning compositional rules and the necessity for experiments and rulebreaking, in a very compact and down to earth text.
This is a must-read for anyone who really wishes to learn about composition.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2012 at 21:42 UTC as 39th comment
On photo Just look into her eyes in the That's called 'Sexy' challenge (16 comments in total)

hard to just look into her eyes as there is so much to look at ...

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2012 at 17:34 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
On photo Land Rover to the Rescue in the British Wheels challenge (10 comments in total)
In reply to:

birdseyeviewphotos: Greeks that are dressed like terrorists should sort out their own problems and not make comments about things they know nothing about. Prove to me it is not a Land Rover I was there in Kenya and also spent 8 years working of British Leyland.

KonstantinosK:
You are neither rude nor wrong, birdseyeviewphotos is. As stated in the first line :-)

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2012 at 09:07 UTC
On photo Hide and Seek in the Hide and Seek challenge (2 comments in total)

Aby?

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 17:17 UTC as 2nd comment
On photo Land Rover to the Rescue in the British Wheels challenge (10 comments in total)
In reply to:

birdseyeviewphotos: Greeks that are dressed like terrorists should sort out their own problems and not make comments about things they know nothing about. Prove to me it is not a Land Rover I was there in Kenya and also spent 8 years working of British Leyland.

birdseyeviewphotos:
You are both rude and wrong. A rather unattractive combination in my opinion.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2012 at 16:51 UTC
On article A sneak peek at our forthcoming camera test scene (320 comments in total)

FYI: The B&W genre scene at far left, just above the middle is a print of a work by the Danish artist Julius Exner. It is titled: "Peasants from Fanø who, in the painters absence, makes fun of his work." and was painted in 1878.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2012 at 20:46 UTC as 26th comment
On photo Me n My Ford in the British Wheels challenge (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

alfaflash: This is a US Ford Mustang and is not remotely British. Also this car has license plates from Abu Dhabi, a town that I have lived in for more than 30 years. This photo is circa 1990 and was taken on the Corniche, so why is the Taken Date given as 2011?

The photo appears to have been shot with a low-quality film camera, and this is a digital photograph (not a scan) of the print.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2012 at 18:04 UTC
On photo 1930 Stutz_MB LaBarron Convertible Coupe in the Old Tyme Wheels challenge (1 comment in total)

This reminds me of a story, I once read. In the 1910's and 1920'es, Stutz and Mercer were competing, and Stutz fans recited this verse:
There never was a worser
car than Mercer
- to which the Mercer fans replied:
You have to be nuts
to drive a Stutz.
I call on all fanboys to be as creative with "Canon" and "Nikon". No prize to be won though :-)

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2012 at 17:06 UTC as 1st comment
On article Canon Powershot S110 hands-on preview (107 comments in total)

I could live with the Sony competitors larger size if it was equipped with a wider zoom. Having a 24 mm equivalent wide angle lens in a pocketable body is a must for holiday and social photography for me.
So I'll keep my S100 until the competition combines those two features with better IQ and better low-light capability.
If you think the S100 or the S110 sucks, then just don't buy it. How hard can that decision be?
Different strokes for different folks.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2012 at 17:19 UTC as 36th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

George Veltchev: There is no doubt that currently Canon 70-200 f/2.8L IS USM II has received the highest possible rating between all competitors in that class, and when Tamron is claiming that the their new lens has ..."achieve leading-edge image quality" then we should really expect a phenomenal peace of glass indeed ... Hope they are right!

Will we ever have peace of glass? I mean - it must be like peace of mind, but with lenses ;-)

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2012 at 21:45 UTC
In reply to:

Mark Roberts: Nikon has always designed their cameras to include proprietary connectors for shutter release cables, etc. Given how inexpensive digital cameras have become, so quickly, I'm constantly amazed that any of the manufacturers can stay in business. Making a relatively tiny profit on low volume accessories isn't much to complain about.

I've actually manufactured an accessory grip (for the D70). We had pretty nice comments about the quality, but it was still nothing compared to the quality from Nikon (luckily Nikon didn't make a grip for the D70). The amount of effort it takes to reverse engineer the connections, do the mechanical design with close detail to the surface feel, the way the dials move, match colors, design the firmware, fabricate the molds, develop a production process, test each unit, etc., requires an investment most people just don't comprehend. Frankly I can't conceive of even attempting to develop a grip like this, and then sell it for only $100. Amazing...

I remember a lesson taught to me in my childhood: If you can't afford to buy what you want, you must save until you can - or wish for Santa Claus to bring it for Christmas.
But no, we want instant gratification! Christmas every month of the year. For how long do we believe that will last?
And by the way: I have a knockoff grip for my 7D, it works fine at half the price of the original. But I worry nonetheless.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2012 at 20:29 UTC
Total: 61, showing: 21 – 40
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