biggles3

Joined on Jan 27, 2013

Comments

Total: 17, showing: 1 – 17

Remarkable value for a very handy lens. It completes my list of needs though much as I'd like a 100S, as an impoverished amateur, I'm sticking with my trusted old 50S. With 3 FF zooms and 1 prime, I can now cover 20-200mm with this new lens and continue to use the camera in any weather. Marvellous! I can see the 20-35mm becoming the most used lens on my camera, especially for landscape images; just wish I could afford to pair it with the 100Mp sensor. With the quality of Fuji's big sensor, you'd hardly need a long lens...

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2022 at 09:30 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On article OM System OM-1 review (1798 comments in total)

This appears to be a significant evolution of the E-M1 series and I am so pleased to see the major improvement to the EVF. As a stills photographer there is nothing about this camera I don't like and I shoot digital MF, FF and most film formats in addition to m43 - each format is suited to different tasks. I think OM Systems have got it about right with this one and I plan to add it to my stable.

My only concern is whether we'll see any firmware upgrades for the MkIII as the new Truepic X processor may be needed for some of the enhanced shooting features.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2022 at 12:00 UTC as 305th comment
In reply to:

photographytragic: I had their "FTL" screw-mount SLR which was designed elsewhere (Minolta or Pentax), and which I suspect was assembled at Olympus from largely bought components. A brief stop-gap before the OM series
I still actively use its clickless 135mm on my Nikon Z7.

A brief fling with an Om10 made me fall in love with their latest lenses, so I bought an OM2SP, disastrous for it's habit of deliberately flattening even new batteries if it thought the battery was low! Olympus would not come to the party even though new. (operator error they said!)
After 3 changes of the unit, I was broke, so gave up and bought a secondhand OM1 and OM2 and never looked back.
But damn! their beautiful chrome and black bodies started me collecting!

Hi Jon, they're very hard to find, as is the Ace. When I bought mine it had the 4.5cm f2.8 mounted and I also bought an E-Zuiko-T 8cm f5.6 which is incredibly sharp. If you wish to see one, you can go to: https://www.flickr.com/photos/164456136@N06/50246501211 where I've posted a piccie of the Ace alongside my E-M1 MkIII wearing, co-incidentally, the 45 f1.8.

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2021 at 17:12 UTC
In reply to:

photographytragic: I had their "FTL" screw-mount SLR which was designed elsewhere (Minolta or Pentax), and which I suspect was assembled at Olympus from largely bought components. A brief stop-gap before the OM series
I still actively use its clickless 135mm on my Nikon Z7.

A brief fling with an Om10 made me fall in love with their latest lenses, so I bought an OM2SP, disastrous for it's habit of deliberately flattening even new batteries if it thought the battery was low! Olympus would not come to the party even though new. (operator error they said!)
After 3 changes of the unit, I was broke, so gave up and bought a secondhand OM1 and OM2 and never looked back.
But damn! their beautiful chrome and black bodies started me collecting!

I still have my FTL - an uninspiring stop-gap - so I tended to us the Olympus Ace instead - and still have that too. I didn't particularly like the OM cameras but loved some of the glass - especially the tiny 50mm f1.2. Although I shoot a lot of digital medium format piccies, my go-to camera is the E-M1 III which I'm really enjoying. I just wish I could mount my 4.5cm f2.8 E.Zuiko lens on it...

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2021 at 09:25 UTC

I love my GFX 50S and the IQ it produces with both Fuji GF lenses and C645 Zeiss lenses via the Fringer AF Adapter. The one thing I would have liked to add to it was in-body IS, especially when using legacy glass. So the 50S II fulfills that need BUT I would miss my EVF with the tilt adapter. The 50S II and zoom would be a nice back-up to my current system but as an amateur 'tog it is difficult to justify the extra expense. Pairing the 50S II with the 50mm f3.5 'pancake' lens would be a great, relatively low cost, way of trying MF photography. Also, with a number of top quality adapters becoming available for a widening variety of legacy lenses, it's in-body IS gives you the opportunity to dip your toe into medium format without breaking the bank. And Fuji should be commended for opening up MF to a wider public. I shoot m4/3, FF, MF and film formats from 110 to 6x9 - they all have their place and test your versatility. it's a great time to be a photographer...

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2021 at 09:14 UTC as 5th comment
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S II review (476 comments in total)

I have been using the 50S for nearly a year now and love it. Fuji's glass, though expensive, is exemplary and the IQ that the combination delivers is first class. Speed of focusing is not an issue for me which is why I have been able to extend the lenses by using the Contax 645 Zeiss glass via the Fringer AF adapter. The 50SII would be a nice back-up for the 50S though the lower EVF magnification and fixed position reduces its appeal a little. BUT in-body IS, especially using legacy glass, makes it an attractive proposition, especially at that price. Nice one Fuji!

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2021 at 13:18 UTC as 50th comment
On article Olympus M.Zuiko 8-25mm F4.0 Pro field review (291 comments in total)

If I did not already own the Panny 10-25, this would be an excellent alternative for general photography. The Panny does not have IS either but on the E-M1 III that is never going to be a limitation. All that being said, the extra 2mm, lightness and compactness of the lens make it an attractive option, especially if travelling where weight and space are at a premium. If I sell my 9-18mm to help offset a little of the cost of the 8-25, that might help justify the expenditure; if I then hit someone over the head with the heft of the 10-25, that might sort out the rest of the cost....

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2021 at 02:58 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply
On article Hands-on with the new Panasonic Leica 25-50mm F1.7 ASPH (391 comments in total)

I have a wide selection of mZuiko lenses which remain true to the compact ideals of the m4/3 concept but I also use several of their Pro series which are necessarily larger and heavier and they all serve specific photographic needs, My only non-Olympus m4/3 lens is the Panasonic Leica 10-25 f1.7 and it is a stunner. At f1.7, I'd expect it be bigger than most m4/3 glass but who cares; it produces beautiful images. And on my E-M1 III with its amazing IS, I've not needed to use a flash indoors since acquiring it. If the 25-50 is only half as good as its sibling, I'd be happy to buy it. I wish there was a similar lens of such exceptional quality for my trusty old Canon EOS 6D...and for a price that wouldn't need a mortgage.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2021 at 09:20 UTC as 5th comment

Regardless of which cameras I'm using, I always pack my trusty old L-408. It remains one of the best I've ever used, offering spot and incidence reading AND being one of the few waterproof meters of its era. And wherever in the world you travel, you can usually find 1 AA battery...

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2021 at 09:19 UTC as 4th comment
On article Hands on: Olympus 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x (716 comments in total)

As always, the m4/3 haters decry the lens; OK we get it, you don't like the system. I use a Canon 6D, OM-D E-M1 III, Fuji GF-X and a Contax 645 with a Hasselblad digital back and they all serve me well. I bought the mZuiko 100-400 and have been amazed at the results, especially hand-held. I have watched a couple of videos of togs using the 150-400 and their results are spectacular - again hand-held. It's a superb piece of engineering and highly rated by those lucky so-and-so's who've been given preliminary access to it. My only complaint as an amateur is the price - knock off $1500 and I might sell my Canon kit to help pay for it and take it to a wildlife haven or two...

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2020 at 11:00 UTC as 24th comment | 1 reply
On article Olympus 100-400mm F5-6.3 IS gallery updated with Raws (203 comments in total)

I love this lens; my other favs are the Lumix 10-25 f1.7 and the mZuiko 45 f1.2. I have no issues with hand-held sharpness shooting using the E-M1 III's IS at smaller aperture settings. I have yet to try it with 1.4x Teleconverter. I would love to have held out for the 150-400 but I fear it will cost north of £4500 which is way beyond my means. I've never had my hands on the mZuiko 300mm f4 Pro but it would be interesting to see a comparison, and when using it with the 1.4x converter. I have no complaints so far.

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2020 at 08:31 UTC as 4th comment

As a user-friendly SLR few cameras can match any of the Yashica FX-3 series cameras for ease of use, low cost and reliability. With a mechanical shutter, it only requires batteries for metering and offers speeds from B to either 1:1000s or 1:2000s depending on the model. With TTL, cente-weighted, full aperture metering, it's easy to use and offers full manual control. And you can choose between Yashica's range of ML lenses (some real beauties among them) or the Contax Zeiss range of stunning (and expensive) glass, plus a large number of independents. Small, simple, easy-to-use and reliable, it's a good choice. I have 3 from the 1970s that are still working perfectly - just an occasional change of leathers and light seals. They've never let me down.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2020 at 09:42 UTC as 25th comment
On article DPReview TV: Fujifilm GF 45-100mm F4 OIS review (150 comments in total)

I'm loving this on my 50S as it's a nice, versatile wide-to-portrait zoom - in essence a 36-80mm in 35mm terms, reminiscent of my first zoom lens back in 1978 which was a Contax Zeiss 40-80 f3.5. I only bought it a fortnight ago, along with the 'pancake' 50mm - lovely images from that little beauty. I also use a Contax 645 with a Hasselblad digital back and use its 80mm (amazing!), 35, 45, 120, 210 and 45-90 lenses. I have a Fringer AF Adapter for the GFX and next week (weather and CoVid-19 permitting) will try the Zeiss 80 f2 on the Fuji for some outdoor portraiture. I'll also take the 45-100 - very curious to compare it at about 60mm with the Zeiss... Should be fun. I'm loving the GFX gear to date - just wish I had deep pockets.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2020 at 10:57 UTC as 3rd comment

Having watched the reviews on YouTube I have placed an order for this. I'm using it on the E-M1 III so IS will be fine. It's IQ seems to be widely appreciated and the splash/dust proofing is good to have with a lens that will mostly be used outdoors. For me, two of its biggest factors are the macro capability throughout the focal range and focus-stacking. I was thinking of waiting until the end of the year for the 150-400 PRO zoom but as an amateur, I will never be able to justify (or afford) the likely price - I'm guessing but probably £3000 or more... What's great is with just 2 lenses, you can now cover 12mm to 400mm for all-weather use (24-800mm in 35 terms) and you can always use the 2 teleconverters for extra reach. Love it.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2020 at 10:45 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III review (1721 comments in total)

In digital terms I have a Fuji GFX 50S, Hasselblad H2 w/22MP back, Contax 645 w/ Ixpress 528C and an Olympus E-P5, E-M1, MkII & MkIII. They all produce wonderful images but the camera that's gets the most use is the E-M1 III for its convenient size, unbelievable IS, superb lenses and versatility. I can happily print A3 piccies from the Olympus and they look wonderful but if I need A1 or larger, then the Contax and Fuji come into play. They all perform their functions perfectly but the little Olympus MkIII is my day-to-day camera. For pure IQ, the medium format models come into their own though the Olympus' High Res mode is mighty impressive. For studio or indoor work, the Fuji, 'Blad and Contax are the stars and not even the Fuji can quite match the Contax/Zeiss combo when shooting in full 16-bit colour, multi-shot mode - its 528MB files are truly amazing even though the technology is dated. But for sheer versatility and portability, the Olympus is a winner and I love it.

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2020 at 08:32 UTC as 85th comment | 3 replies

Yashica's FX-3 range (FX-3, FX-3 Super, FX-3 Super 2000) offers 3 tough little cameras that have shutters that simply go on and on and are mechanical so batteries are not an issue. The batteries are purely for metering. The cameras give you access to the entire range of Zeiss and Yashica lenses with a C/Y (Contax/Yashica) mount as well as all of Tamron's Adaptal lenses and much good glass from the likes of Tokina, Sigma and other leading independents. Unfortunately, a number of Yashica's ML lenses are now becoming recognised for their quality (being eclipsed back in the day by their very expensive Zeiss cousins) and prices for them are moving north fast! I still use my Contax and Yashica gear from the 70s and 80s and their lenses still deliver, whether using film or digital equipment. The FX-3s, much praised by reviewers at the time, are cheap, under-appreciated classics - cameras that simply keep on giving.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2019 at 09:25 UTC as 90th comment
On article Elevating X-Trans? Fujifilm X-T2 Review (2195 comments in total)

The X-T2 is really exciting and I've loved using my X-T1. However, although I've kept my little X-M1, I've switched to the Olympus E-M1 because it has an in-camera facility that I like to use as I enjoy shooting macro - focus stacking. I have asked Fuji if this may be something they plan for the future (it would need a firmware change in both lenses and cameras to work effectively) - if so, I'm right back to Fuji as I love their glass. (I still use my GX680III regularly with a large number of lenses). Here's hoping....

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2016 at 09:48 UTC as 73rd comment
Total: 17, showing: 1 – 17