SteveY80

Joined on Dec 29, 2012

Comments

Total: 104, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Adrian Green: What happens to the guys left leg and his dogs feet in the bottom pic?

If they'd shown something like this working 100% perfectly I'd be highly suspicious of the demonstration. This shows it working well enough to save a lot of time, even if it still needs some manual tweaking.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2017 at 18:51 UTC

I wonder why it ended up being heavier than similar lenses for larger formats?

For that weight and price it had better be one of the sharpest lenses ever made...

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2017 at 11:10 UTC as 78th comment | 2 replies

It's a shame they haven't copied Olympus/Panasonic focus bracketing along with the Olympus/Pentax high-res mode. With the high speed shooting that would be really useful for focus stacked macro.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2017 at 09:56 UTC as 235th comment | 2 replies

An impressive device and considerably cheaper than an equivalent MacBook Pro.

I have a mild preference for Mac OS over Windows 10, but for me the choice would probably come down to details, like the quality of the screen, keyboard and trackpad.

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2017 at 23:13 UTC as 24th comment | 8 replies

Reminds me of the hazy shots I got with an old Tokina zoom I found in a junk shop. I threw it away afterwards because it turned out to be full of fungus.

Maybe if it was $64.95 it'd be worth it as a fun toy to play around with...

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2017 at 16:35 UTC as 120th comment
In reply to:

WestO: These look like repackaged Sirui tripods. The twist leg locks and even the Arca Swiss plate isn't consistent with what Manfrotto has been doing.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?A=details&O=&Q=&ap=y&c3api=1876%2C%7Bcreative%7D%2C%7Bkeyword%7D&gclid=Cj0KCQjwvOzOBRDGARIsAICjxoemHi_lP-mI8PgGPfd1ZQbYpTViDLQFhPHmaz3XM1Ku_DZOHwpse_4aAszPEALw_wcB&is=REG&m=Y&sku=1244072

I was just thinking the same thing. The details seem too similar for it to be a coincidence.

Sirui make excellent tripods, but I can't see much reason to buy one that's Manfrotto branded.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2017 at 16:45 UTC
On article 10 macro photography tips for beginners (51 comments in total)

Decent close-up lenses like the Raynox DCR-150/250 are another good option that don't get a mention here.

They work great on a telephoto zoom like a 70-200 (something that a lot of people will already own) and are easy to use and intuitive. Image quality is surprisingly close to a "real" macro lens.

They're the only real option for compact/bridge camera owners who want to try macro and I've seen great results from that combination.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2017 at 11:19 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

composed: LOL - Drag and drop being 'celebrated', so funny!

You're just embarrassing yourself with these childish trolling comments. But I will take to heart the one sensible thing you've said and ignore you from now on.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2017 at 22:32 UTC
In reply to:

composed: LOL - Drag and drop being 'celebrated', so funny!

The fact that you and your colleagues aren't using tablets for anything doesn't mean that's true of all other professionals in the same field. Not everyone requires the same specific tools to do their job - some people are certainly using the iPad Pro professionally, and producing impressive results.

I'm not saying that the iPad Pro is going to take over and replace laptops and desktops any time soon, all I'm saying is that it's a much more capable and versatile piece of computing hardware than you seem to think.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2017 at 21:39 UTC
In reply to:

composed: LOL - Drag and drop being 'celebrated', so funny!

It's also a great device for art and graphics (I've seen professionals create designs, cartoons, and logos from scratch on an iPad Pro), editing audio and video, and developing software. With Affinity it has very competent photo editing capabilities too.

In my opinion it's pretty great for most of the things that a modern laptop is great for. Add a keyboard stand and it more-or-less is a fast and responsive modern laptop.

I'm not saying that the software available for iOS is on a par with desktop software in every category, or that there aren't things that a laptop can handle better (e.g. there's no support for multiple screens in iOS), but the idea that an iPad Pro is only for consuming media is truly absurd. You just have to look at what people are using it for in the real world to see that.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2017 at 21:21 UTC
In reply to:

composed: LOL - Drag and drop being 'celebrated', so funny!

I've run into quite a few professionals (web designers, graphic designers, software developers, journalists, film makers, etc.) who have completely switched to iPad for all of their work.

An iPad isn't quite ready to replace my laptop, but with software like Affinity, LumaFusion, Continuous IDE, etc. it's ridiculous to say it isn't a "proper computing device".

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2017 at 17:40 UTC
In reply to:

deep7: Strange negativity in the comments. This is the closest we have EVER had to that legendary "perfect" all-in-one camera and it's not massive and the price is, frankly, amazing for what it has. No one is forced to buy it but, for those who value flexibility, you'd be hard pushed to do better. Well, you could get two or three bodies with different lenses on them and benefit from a better sensor but that would be massive...

The actual IQ of the specific lenses available is another issue. It would be interesting to compare the 75-300 and 100-300 m4/3 lenses with the RX10 IV, all of them at the longest focal length.

Based on the shots I've seen, I think the RX10 III/IV would win quite easily. Its zoom is pretty good wide open at the "600mm" end, while Panasonic's 100-300mm really needs to be stopped down to f/7.1 or f/8 to get reasonable quality at 300mm.

Even at its sharpest aperture the 100-300 isn't a lens for heavy croppers or pixel peepers. The Olympus 75-300 is perhaps a touch sharper, but is slower and lacks image stabilisation.

Panasonic's 100-400mm would be a different story, but then that's a relatively heavy and expensive lens.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2017 at 23:51 UTC
In reply to:

SteB: Very good. It's worth mentioning here that the article linked to is by John Hallmen, one of the best macro photographers in the world. I've found that Google translate does a great job with this blog with only the odd word it can't translate.

This is John's Flickr Photostream for anyone who wants to know why I regard John as one of the best macro photographers in the world. Prepare to be blown away.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnhallmen/

Anyone who is interested in this article may be fascinated with another article by John, where using a similar set up to this, but with the Canon 24mm f2.8 STM + a small CCTV lens John has created a relay lens set up, a type of high magnification fish-eye lens, which produces images only this type of set-up can produce. Just pop the link into Google translate to read in English.
http://makrofokus.se/blogg/2016/9/22/diy-makro-fisheye.html

His stacked shots of live subjects in the field really are amazing.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 23:37 UTC
In reply to:

SteveY80: I find it interesting that such a slow shutter speed has been used for these shots.

I’ve had limited success when trying to mix flash and natural light like that. The flash might freeze most of the movement, but an insect's waving antennae still end up with a dark motion blur when I use 1/100s, let alone the 1/40s recommended here.

Bright point highlights on the subject can also end up smearing into little lines if there’s a lot of movement, e.g. a bug on a leaf that’s blowing in the breeze. I've seen that even when using my camera's maximum 1/250s flash sync.

It's not clear to me why his technique/gear would produce better results at slow shutter speeds...

@Tommi K1
My diffused Nissin i40 flash wouldn't sufficiently illuminate the subject at its minimum power. If I did use such a low power I'd have to open up my aperture and increase ISO, and then the flash wouldn't be the dominant light source.

It isn't the flash's ability to freeze movement that's the issue. In fact, I find that even a relatively high flash power like 1/8 will usually keep the subject sharp. The problem is with the mixing of ambient light and flash illumination at a slow shutter speed.

Even if the subject it in shadow and reduced to a silhouette without flash illumination, any movement against a bright background during the exposure still results in a dark blur. Freezing the movement with a quick burst of flash doesn't fix that.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 23:26 UTC

Having known a number of people who’ve struggled to achieve diversity at their events (both in the photographic and computer industries), I personally don’t doubt that Nikon are telling the truth about inviting some women.

For whatever reason, women seem less likely to accept that kind of offer. Even if the invitations are 50/50 that doesn’t guarantee gender balance at the event.

A lack of women doesn’t necessarily mean that the organisers are a bunch of sexist pigs conspiring to keep it a boy’s club. I know events that have been postponed, or even completely cancelled, due to a lack of women speakers. That’s despite the organisers taking diversity and inclusion seriously and making an effort to fix the problem.

Even finding women to speak at a local camera club can be a real challenge. Where I live there are plenty of women working as professional photographers, not to mention all the talented amateurs, but disproportionately few are on the judging/speaking circuit.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 21:25 UTC as 156th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

SteveY80: I find it interesting that such a slow shutter speed has been used for these shots.

I’ve had limited success when trying to mix flash and natural light like that. The flash might freeze most of the movement, but an insect's waving antennae still end up with a dark motion blur when I use 1/100s, let alone the 1/40s recommended here.

Bright point highlights on the subject can also end up smearing into little lines if there’s a lot of movement, e.g. a bug on a leaf that’s blowing in the breeze. I've seen that even when using my camera's maximum 1/250s flash sync.

It's not clear to me why his technique/gear would produce better results at slow shutter speeds...

Yes, I know that using a slower shutter speed lets in more ambient light. What I'm asking is how to avoid blur while mixing that ambient light with flash.

With a bright background, even if I shade the subject so that it's primarily being lit by the flash, I find that any movement results in a dark blur (like a shadow at the edge of the subject) against the ambient light.

For example, I took a sequence of shots of a spider in a web wrapping up its prey. The sky behind it provided a bright background even when using f/16 or f/22. Almost all of the early shots were blurred when I left the shutter speed at 1/100s, and even after raising it to 1/250s there was some smearing against the background where its legs were moving. The only way to get consistently sharp shots was to change the angle so that the background behind it was dark.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 07:25 UTC

I find it interesting that such a slow shutter speed has been used for these shots.

I’ve had limited success when trying to mix flash and natural light like that. The flash might freeze most of the movement, but an insect's waving antennae still end up with a dark motion blur when I use 1/100s, let alone the 1/40s recommended here.

Bright point highlights on the subject can also end up smearing into little lines if there’s a lot of movement, e.g. a bug on a leaf that’s blowing in the breeze. I've seen that even when using my camera's maximum 1/250s flash sync.

It's not clear to me why his technique/gear would produce better results at slow shutter speeds...

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2017 at 22:59 UTC as 16th comment | 8 replies

It’s interesting to see how many different macro options people come up with, all of them producing good results in the right hands.

Personally I prefer using Raynox close-up filters on a telephoto zoom rather than reversed lenses. They provide more range of magnification (switch between a shot of the whole insect and a close-up of its head just by zooming) and significantly more working distance at high magnification. I can also quickly remove the filter to use it as a normal telephoto (for opportunistic shots of larger subjects).

One thing I’ve struggled with is lighting the subject well with flash. Big diffusers provide soft light, but they can be impractically bulky, or block too much light and stop the flash from freezing movement.

Unfortunately, I don’t think that Micael Widell has really solved that here. Moving the flash close using the arm has helped, but there’s a noticeable hotspot on the shiny back of both of the ladybirds/ladybugs.

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2017 at 22:15 UTC as 18th comment
On article Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III Review (594 comments in total)
In reply to:

SteveY80: I'll never understand why both Olympus and Panasonic cripple auto-ISO in most of their cameras. The primitive auto-ISO is the main thing I dislike about my current m4/3 cameras and I'm not going to buy another one until they've sorted it out.

@Tommi K1
Nitpicking about terminology doesn't change the fact that this can be a really useful feature in a lot of different circumstances.

It's something that's available on most other current cameras, so its omission is a disadvantage for most of the m4/3 line-up (other than a few high-end models).

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2017 at 13:35 UTC
On article Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III Review (594 comments in total)
In reply to:

SteveY80: I'll never understand why both Olympus and Panasonic cripple auto-ISO in most of their cameras. The primitive auto-ISO is the main thing I dislike about my current m4/3 cameras and I'm not going to buy another one until they've sorted it out.

For me the main problem is that there's no was of setting exposure compensation in manual mode + auto-ISO. That renders the mode pretty much useless in most of the situations where I'd want to use it.

Some other systems (e.g. Fuji) also allow separate control over minimum shutter speed, which can be useful in some circumstances. Most m4/3 cameras are really backward and primitive in comparison when it comes to auto-ISO handling.

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2017 at 03:02 UTC
Total: 104, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »