SteveY80

Joined on Dec 29, 2012

Comments

Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
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On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

Noah Placebo: And maybe they should change their logo and their name if they want to be taken seriously.

The name really does make me cringe. I remember recommending GIMP to a co-worker years ago and getting laughed at.

He thought it was a gullibility test and gimp.org was really a 'tubgirl' type gross-out site that I was trying to trick him into viewing. Although back then the GIMP website was so amateurish that he'd probably still have thought I was joking if he had gone to it.

These days I consider the ease of use of Photoshop to be worth paying for, but it's amazing what GIMP can do for free. More people should at least be aware that it's an option. The name really doesn't help.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 23:21 UTC
On article Feisty upstart: Hands-on with the Fujifilm X-T20 (341 comments in total)

Nice to see they've included a touch screen. To me that makes it the most interesting camera Fuji currently offer.

Hopefully it'll provide the ability to move the focus point while using the EVF, like Olympus/Panasonic/Sony have implemented.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 10:54 UTC as 58th comment
On article A comfortable fit: Panasonic Lumix GX850 overview (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

SteveY80: Micro SD? Yuck.

Not the end of the world, but they fitted a full size SD card in the smaller GM1 so I don't understand this decision...

Anyone know if it has auto-ISO in manual + exposure compensation like its much bigger brother the GH5?

That can be really handy for street photography (to maintain a deep depth of field and motion freezing shutter speed in changeable lighting), which is what I'd mainly want to use this for.

@Raist3d
That doesn't work for non-CPU lenses (e.g. adapted vintage lenses or manual lenses like the Samyang fisheye).

Attach a lens without electronics and the camera automatically uses the electronic shutter at all shutter speeds, unless flash is used.

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2017 at 00:22 UTC
In reply to:

Androole: "The GH5 becomes the first Panasonic to allow the use of Auto ISO in manual exposure mode. It also maintains exposure compensation, when doing so. This is true for both stills and video."

Hallelujah! They listened! They listened!

Best feature addition.

The GX8 (or other previous Panasonic cameras) doesn't have this exact feature - there's auto ISO in manual, but no exposure compensation in that mode, or setting of minimum shutter speed.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 01:39 UTC

I'm not sure anyone else will care, but to me it's a bit of a shame that the 45-175mm hasn't been updated too. It's a great little lens and doesn't extend when zooming - it must be one of the few lenses that doesn't support dual IS.

I wonder if there'll be some bargain 35-100 f/2.8 mk1s appearing on the used market any time soon?

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 20:02 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply
On article A comfortable fit: Panasonic Lumix GX850 overview (117 comments in total)

Micro SD? Yuck.

Not the end of the world, but they fitted a full size SD card in the smaller GM1 so I don't understand this decision...

Anyone know if it has auto-ISO in manual + exposure compensation like its much bigger brother the GH5?

That can be really handy for street photography (to maintain a deep depth of field and motion freezing shutter speed in changeable lighting), which is what I'd mainly want to use this for.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 19:59 UTC as 40th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Androole: "The GH5 becomes the first Panasonic to allow the use of Auto ISO in manual exposure mode. It also maintains exposure compensation, when doing so. This is true for both stills and video."

Hallelujah! They listened! They listened!

Best feature addition.

Finally! Panasonic must be the last camera manufacturer to add that useful feature.

Hopefully their future lower end cameras will share it. For me m4/3 provides a lightweight backup to larger camera system, and I'm not much of a video shooter, so it's the GX9/GX95 that I'll be waiting for.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 19:51 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: This baby (37Mpix) is much sharper than Nikon 40mm (14Mpix) , 60 mm macro (20 Mpix) and Canon 50 mm macro according to DXO lab results. This is the sharpest macro lens ever seen on DXO lab results. Focus hunting results from the fact that you dont know what you are doing. Macro work is the most difficult but the least appreciated job in photography, you have to read and understand diffraction, sync speed, the behaviour of the insects. Full frame is not suitable for macro, APS-C format is the best I believe. The tests are done with FF cameras, and FF camera can not focus on the head of a dragonfly as a whole, and people think that this lens is not good and they buy another more expensive lens.

@Fun 4 all:
Olympus IS is superb, but of course it doesn't help with moving subjects, like insects in the wild, or even a flower moved by the breeze.

Pretty much all the macro work I've done has either used a tripod, or been handheld with a diffused flash to freeze movement. Most of the time that allows me to use base ISO regardless of f-stop and ambient light.

@Magnar W:
As long as there's sufficient magnification to fill the frame with the subject, and sufficient light (natural or artificial) to stop down for sufficient DOF (without pushing the ISO), I'd say that a larger sensor has a definite advantage.

I find m4/3 a nice compromise between size/weight and image quality, but if I have to push shadows in post (e.g. after underexposing to preserve highlights), I definitely notice the greater noise and reduced DR compared with a full frame sensor.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 01:57 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tilted Plane: This lens is super sharp once you stop down a couple stops, equal to the fantastic Sony 28 f/2. But beware, the autofocus (on an A7r) is horrific. Basically unusable for many situations. If you don't need the short working distance (which I do, for copy work), and you have the money (which I don't), consider the Sony 90mm macro instead.

Some Sigma A-mount lenses, including the 105mm macro, do have OIS. It doesn't work in conjunction with IBIS, so you have to remember to turn stabilisation off on either the body or lens.

The existing Sigma and Tamron lenses are good enough that I don't really see the lack of updated Sony A-mount macro lenses as much of a problem.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 17:26 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: This baby (37Mpix) is much sharper than Nikon 40mm (14Mpix) , 60 mm macro (20 Mpix) and Canon 50 mm macro according to DXO lab results. This is the sharpest macro lens ever seen on DXO lab results. Focus hunting results from the fact that you dont know what you are doing. Macro work is the most difficult but the least appreciated job in photography, you have to read and understand diffraction, sync speed, the behaviour of the insects. Full frame is not suitable for macro, APS-C format is the best I believe. The tests are done with FF cameras, and FF camera can not focus on the head of a dragonfly as a whole, and people think that this lens is not good and they buy another more expensive lens.

I use Micro Four Thirds for macro, but I don't agree that full frame is unsuitable for macro work. All it means is remembering to stop down 1 stop more than APS-C and 2 stops more than m4/3 to get the same depth of field. It's only really a problem if the narrowest lens aperture still doesn't provide enough DOF.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 16:33 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 Review (396 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: "the camera is extremely reticent to use ISOs higher than 1600"

As it should be. On 1" format, that's about the upper limit of what you'd normally want to use. In the special case that a photographer needs to stop motion in low light, shutter priority exposure should be used.

Any "auto" feature in a camera must be like this: prioritize the needs of the many above the needs of the few. Unless the camera can detect a fast moving subject and adjust dynamically, autoISO in program auto or aperture priority should try to keep noise as low as possible to the limit of avoiding camera shake.

As I mentioned, it isn't really misnamed as technically ISO isn't an exposure setting - manual mode still provides full control over exposure even with auto-ISO on. Of course that does mean exposure compensation is misnamed when it's only adjusting the ISO...

Pentax aside, I think most camera makers at the moment simply provide the option of auto-ISO in M. I don't see it causing much confusion among current Fuji/Sony/Nikon/Canon users.

Manual + auto-ISO is easily my favourite mode because of its unique combination of control and speed. On a twin dial camera aperture/shutter speed can be quickly adjusted, while changing ISO is generally slower, without a dedicated control.

That can make a big difference when shooting wildlife/BiF in changeable lighting, or indoor events where subjects/situations are different from moment to moment (e.g. taking a shallow DOF portrait one second and a wide crowd shot the next). Pausing to pointlessly micromanage ISO between shots can mean missed shots.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 01:24 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 Review (396 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: "the camera is extremely reticent to use ISOs higher than 1600"

As it should be. On 1" format, that's about the upper limit of what you'd normally want to use. In the special case that a photographer needs to stop motion in low light, shutter priority exposure should be used.

Any "auto" feature in a camera must be like this: prioritize the needs of the many above the needs of the few. Unless the camera can detect a fast moving subject and adjust dynamically, autoISO in program auto or aperture priority should try to keep noise as low as possible to the limit of avoiding camera shake.

Manual mode has never been purely manual on any Panasonic camera as all of them support TTL flash in manual mode. Connect an automatic flash in manual and it'll adjust flash power to set exposure by the camera's meter.
I always find it strange that "manual is manual" purists never seem to complain about that flash automation feature being available in manual. To be consistent, shouldn't you be calling for Panasonic to remove the TTL flash options and force it into manual power settings when using M mode?

Surely if auto-ISO in M should have it's own separate mode, TTL flash in manual should have a "flash priority mode" too?

To me it just seems absurd to create separate modes purely because of issues with the terminology used, especially if it isn't going to be applied consistently anyway.

If you want to be really pedantic, ISO isn't technically an exposure setting anyway. It just changes the brightness of the image, while flash/SS/aperture actually change the exposure.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2016 at 14:06 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 Review (396 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: "the camera is extremely reticent to use ISOs higher than 1600"

As it should be. On 1" format, that's about the upper limit of what you'd normally want to use. In the special case that a photographer needs to stop motion in low light, shutter priority exposure should be used.

Any "auto" feature in a camera must be like this: prioritize the needs of the many above the needs of the few. Unless the camera can detect a fast moving subject and adjust dynamically, autoISO in program auto or aperture priority should try to keep noise as low as possible to the limit of avoiding camera shake.

The problem with shutter priority is that even with a small sensor and dull light it's still sometimes necessary to stop down for depth of field. It's a shame that this camera doesn't offer a minimum shutter speed option that could be used in aperture priority with auto-ISO. That would let people prioritise shutter speed over low ISO without the limitations of shutter priority.

Or alternatively, they could finally implement auto-ISO in manual with exposure compensation, so that both aperture and shutter can be controlled while the auto-ISO deals with image brightness. People have been asking Panasonic for that for years now...

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2016 at 01:02 UTC
On article Fast Five: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V Review (416 comments in total)

I find it very strange that this wasn't upgraded to a touch screen while the a6500 was. To me that's the biggest usability issue with this camera compared with its competitors. A touch screen is really useful on a compact camera with limited controls, especially for quickly setting the focus point.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 16:46 UTC as 157th comment | 1 reply
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (870 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wye Photography: Lot of peeps bitchin about no SD slot. Well, in time it will become irrelevant anyway as new cameras come with wifi and wifi will be the easiest way of transferring data. I bet in a few year's time everybody will be busy transferring by wifi and the poor old SD slot will end up redundant.

Good move Apple.

Apart from being painfully slow compared to using a card reader, using Wifi uses a significant amount of power.

I took some photos at an event with my GM1 and tried downloading the images using Wifi - I needed images quickly for social media there was no card reader in the PC I had available. The battery was flat before the images had transferred, and going to the nearest computer shop to buy a card reader ended up being faster than Wifi transfer anyway.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 15:45 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (870 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mister J: I come here for photography, not for a rehash of Apple-PC wars.

Message to supporters of either side - buy what you like, but please leave the carping for another day.

Why not just ignore stories that you personally aren't interested in?

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 13:05 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (870 comments in total)

I've just been having a look at what I could buy for the same price from Lenovo, Dell, and similar companies. Back when I bought my current MacBook Pro they were pretty competitive, especially considering the high-resolution Retina screen and some of the nice touches missing from the Windows alternatives.

Now, at least when looking at the spec, this new MacBook pro is utterly butchered by the competition. Maybe those Windows laptops have some major issues that I'm missing (beyond running Windows), but on paper the raw speed and capacity they offer just blows the new MacBook Pro away.

I'm talking a 17" 4K IPS screen, 32Gb RAM and 1Tb SSD for less than the 15" MacBook Pro with 16Gb and 512Gb. I've actually struggled to find a compact 15" Windows laptop that's as expensive as the basic model (256Gb SSD) MacBook Pro, even when maxing out the RAM and SSD on the Windows model.

I'd have to hate Windows 10 much more than I do to buy a MacBook Pro today.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 21:58 UTC as 178th comment | 1 reply
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (870 comments in total)
In reply to:

cantanima bis: After years of installing flaky card readers that insist an SD card is read-only, I guess Apple decided "no SD reader" was better than ponying up for "functional SD reader."

I use the SD card reader all the time on my MacBook Pro without any issues.

The price of an external card reader is trivial, but I often download pictures with the thing resting on my knee. I don't like the idea of a USB adapter+USB cable+card reader hanging off the edge of the laptop while it's transferring my images. If nothing else, it's another thing to lose/forget...

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 21:39 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (870 comments in total)
In reply to:

VadymA: Why not make the entire keyboard touchscreen? That would be interesting.

It'd be a terrible idea for anyone who actually uses their laptop for typing.

Anyone remember the flat keyboard ZX81/Timex Sinclair 1000?

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 21:36 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (870 comments in total)

I've got a previous generation 15" Macbook Pro - 2.2Ghz i7 & 16Gb RAM. I've been seriously considering upgrading and was waiting for this to be released before making a decision. Unfortunately I can't see much reason why I'd upgrade to one of these.

The basic model, with the SSD upgraded to 512Gb (my Lightroom catalogue alone would eat a significant chunk of the free space on a 256Gb drive), costs over £2500 (and that's before I've stocked up on adapters to use my existing peripherals). I don't think the faster CPU and new features are worth that to me.

The lack of RAM is the main bottleneck for Photoshop work, and this doesn't improve on that. The touch bar is nifty, but I really can't see it making a big difference to the way I use the computer. If anything, I think the minor annoyance of having to carry around extra adapters and dongles might outweigh that feature. I know that sooner or later I'll end up out and about with camera and Macbook without carrying a card reader+adapter.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 19:31 UTC as 213th comment
Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
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