SteveY80

Joined on Dec 29, 2012

Comments

Total: 77, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »

It's a shame in my opinion. This was a camera system with real potential that Nikon utterly squandered.

I switched to a Panasonic GM1 as my pocket camera (the far superior range of m4/3 lenses was hard to resist), but I still use my IR converted Nikon 1 J1.

The J5, with its decent PDAF and Sony sensor, is a really nice camera. It's a shame there wasn't a higher end 'V' model with the same sensor and superior capabilities (including hotshoe/EVF) to pair with the CX 70-300mm as a compact wildlife system.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2017 at 10:08 UTC as 25th comment
On article Ten expert tips for successful macro photography (130 comments in total)
In reply to:

DNature: I quite like the spider shots, the lizard and the cool looking eyes of the hoverfly (I have always liked the markings of flies like hoverflies, even if I get bitten by hoverflies quite often! in the summer!), but the cockroach in 10 is practically out of focus as is most of the bess beetle in 5. Really those two needed much more DOF to be useful as unless you only want a very small area in focus for a reason, with macro you'd really want to have much more in focus than that.

I downloaded the cockroach shot to more easily pixel peep, and also took a look at the EXIF.

It looks like the point of focus was slightly in front of the subject's body, leaving nothing but a part of the antennae sharp.

It was shot at f/13, so it does a good job of demonstrating just how tiny the depth of field is when shooting close-up on such a large sensor. For a subject like that, even the 120mm Fuji's f/32 minimum aperture probably wouldn't be enough to get it all in focus.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 23:10 UTC
On article Ten expert tips for successful macro photography (130 comments in total)
In reply to:

Scoobaru: Does anyone know exactly what the diffusion material/object is in image 1 ? The diffusion material is the thing I am still struggling to sort out.

I've seen him mention using thin sheets of paper as diffusion material. I assume that the DIY diffusion in that shot is something like A4 sheets of tracing paper held in plastic wallets.

It would be nice if more details were provided to explain exactly what it is...

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 15:41 UTC
On article Ten expert tips for successful macro photography (130 comments in total)

I'm always really impressed with Thomas Shahan's work. Most of it's shot in the field, rather than taking subjects into a more controlled mini-studio as seen in that video.

He's someone I point to when people claim that macro photography always requires a tripod, or that high-end gear is needed to take decent macro shots. Of course he's showing off a rather expensive camera here, but the results he gets with his old Pentax DSLR and DIY lighting are every bit as impressive.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 13:28 UTC as 47th comment
On article Panasonic Leica DG 15mm F1.7 shooting experience (405 comments in total)

It's a very good lens - I have the DJI version and it's a favourite on my GM1.

The aperture ring is nice to have on that camera due to its single fiddly little control wheel (which becomes an exposure compensation dial in aperture priority with this lens attached). My only criticism is that the aperture ring (on mine at least) is a little loose and can easily be moved by accident, especially if the camera is rolling around in a jacket pocket.

What I can't understand is the fuss about it being 15mm/"30mm" rather than a more common focal length.

I've seen people dismiss the lens because of that "unnatural" focal length, or hold it up as something unique because of it. In reality, there's barely any difference in field of view when comparing this to the Panasonic's cheaper 14mm pancake lens. That extra 1mm is a non-issue when it comes to real world use of the lens.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 17:03 UTC as 38th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

composed: People still use Mac's for editing?

Not trying to be a smarta$$ here, I sincerely don't understand how someone could comparison shop and choose a Mac...

@Bhima78
It sounds like you haven't used a Mac in 10-15 years, and even back then you could have just plugged in a generic two button mouse to get right click functionality.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 00:07 UTC

How do the screen and trackpad compare?

The main reason why I bought a MacBook pro a few years ago was that I tried a number of laptops and the trackpad on the MacBook was clearly better than the alternatives. To me this is very important for a laptop that I'll be using for photo editing on the move.

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2017 at 23:59 UTC as 267th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Dave Lively: The author left what is probably the best m43 lens for this purpose off his chart, the Panasonic 15mm f1.7.

Designed to work well with the GM5 it is small, fast and has a good reputation optically. I decided to go with the Olympus 17mm f1.8 because it was less expensive but looked hard at the 15mm. I tried the Panasonic 20mm first but found its focusing too slow and noisy.

I guess they aren't classing it as a 'pancake lens', although I'd agree that it really should have made the list. I use one on my GM1 for a small and lightweight street photography kit that still offers decent quality.

It's especially appropriate for an X100 alternative, as it's the only AF m4/3 lens in that focal length range with an aperture ring.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2017 at 12:22 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $500-900 (553 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bambi24: Canon gives users what they need.

An easy to use and navigate UI.
Ergonomic button placement.
Good battery life with an OVF.
Cheap, yet high quality and extensive range of EF-S lenses.
Great AF, both in viewfinder and live view.
Great JPEG quality out of the box.

Sony and Fuji are waving around with specs, trying to grab attention. Yet they are not fun or intuitive cameras to use. Sony lacks lenses, Fuji massively overprices them. The battery life is poor, cameras overheat, horrible Sony kit lenses, not nice to hold and bad ergonomics.

"why do people keep buying rebels"....because they work better than the competition that can only offer specs

I'm sure that's all true for some people, although a lot of the people I see with Rebels are using them in Auto mode and only own the kit lens.

I think in a lot of cases the Canon camera purchase is more down to what the shop they went to stocked/recommended, rather than the needs/preferences of the photographer.

Link | Posted on May 5, 2017 at 10:02 UTC
On article Ask the staff: electronic or optical viewfinder? (890 comments in total)

I prefer EVFs because they offer features like focus peaking and magnification for manual focus, as well as zebras and image review without chimping. EVF lag seems like a non-issue now - I use my Sony A77ii to shoot birds in flight and aerobatics at airshows without any problems.

On smaller cameras I find that I don't really miss a viewfinder at all as long as there's a tilt screen. I only use the EVF on my GX7 if light's glaring on the screen or I'm trying to stabilise a long telephoto. Being able to frame shots with the camera held over my head, or at a low level without having to lie down on the ground, is more useful to me. If I had to choose between a camera with an EVF and fixed screen, or a tilt screen only, I'd choose the one without the viewfinder.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2017 at 12:40 UTC as 347th comment
On article Feisty upstart: Hands-on with the Fujifilm X-T20 (357 comments in total)

Nice to see they've included a touch screen. To me that makes it the most interesting camera Fuji currently offer.

Hopefully it'll provide the ability to move the focus point while using the EVF, like Olympus/Panasonic/Sony have implemented.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 10:54 UTC as 66th comment
On article A comfortable fit: Panasonic Lumix GX850 overview (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

SteveY80: Micro SD? Yuck.

Not the end of the world, but they fitted a full size SD card in the smaller GM1 so I don't understand this decision...

Anyone know if it has auto-ISO in manual + exposure compensation like its much bigger brother the GH5?

That can be really handy for street photography (to maintain a deep depth of field and motion freezing shutter speed in changeable lighting), which is what I'd mainly want to use this for.

@Raist3d
That doesn't work for non-CPU lenses (e.g. adapted vintage lenses or manual lenses like the Samyang fisheye).

Attach a lens without electronics and the camera automatically uses the electronic shutter at all shutter speeds, unless flash is used.

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2017 at 00:22 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Review (1179 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: "The GH5 becomes the first Panasonic to allow the use of Auto ISO in manual exposure mode. It also maintains exposure compensation, when doing so. This is true for both stills and video."

Hallelujah! They listened! They listened!

Best feature addition.

The GX8 (or other previous Panasonic cameras) doesn't have this exact feature - there's auto ISO in manual, but no exposure compensation in that mode, or setting of minimum shutter speed.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 01:39 UTC

I'm not sure anyone else will care, but to me it's a bit of a shame that the 45-175mm hasn't been updated too. It's a great little lens and doesn't extend when zooming - it must be one of the few lenses that doesn't support dual IS.

I wonder if there'll be some bargain 35-100 f/2.8 mk1s appearing on the used market any time soon?

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 20:02 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply
On article A comfortable fit: Panasonic Lumix GX850 overview (119 comments in total)

Micro SD? Yuck.

Not the end of the world, but they fitted a full size SD card in the smaller GM1 so I don't understand this decision...

Anyone know if it has auto-ISO in manual + exposure compensation like its much bigger brother the GH5?

That can be really handy for street photography (to maintain a deep depth of field and motion freezing shutter speed in changeable lighting), which is what I'd mainly want to use this for.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 19:59 UTC as 41st comment | 4 replies
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Review (1179 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: "The GH5 becomes the first Panasonic to allow the use of Auto ISO in manual exposure mode. It also maintains exposure compensation, when doing so. This is true for both stills and video."

Hallelujah! They listened! They listened!

Best feature addition.

Finally! Panasonic must be the last camera manufacturer to add that useful feature.

Hopefully their future lower end cameras will share it. For me m4/3 provides a lightweight backup to larger camera system, and I'm not much of a video shooter, so it's the GX9/GX95 that I'll be waiting for.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 19:51 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: This baby (37Mpix) is much sharper than Nikon 40mm (14Mpix) , 60 mm macro (20 Mpix) and Canon 50 mm macro according to DXO lab results. This is the sharpest macro lens ever seen on DXO lab results. Focus hunting results from the fact that you dont know what you are doing. Macro work is the most difficult but the least appreciated job in photography, you have to read and understand diffraction, sync speed, the behaviour of the insects. Full frame is not suitable for macro, APS-C format is the best I believe. The tests are done with FF cameras, and FF camera can not focus on the head of a dragonfly as a whole, and people think that this lens is not good and they buy another more expensive lens.

@Fun 4 all:
Olympus IS is superb, but of course it doesn't help with moving subjects, like insects in the wild, or even a flower moved by the breeze.

Pretty much all the macro work I've done has either used a tripod, or been handheld with a diffused flash to freeze movement. Most of the time that allows me to use base ISO regardless of f-stop and ambient light.

@Magnar W:
As long as there's sufficient magnification to fill the frame with the subject, and sufficient light (natural or artificial) to stop down for sufficient DOF (without pushing the ISO), I'd say that a larger sensor has a definite advantage.

I find m4/3 a nice compromise between size/weight and image quality, but if I have to push shadows in post (e.g. after underexposing to preserve highlights), I definitely notice the greater noise and reduced DR compared with a full frame sensor.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 01:57 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tilted Plane: This lens is super sharp once you stop down a couple stops, equal to the fantastic Sony 28 f/2. But beware, the autofocus (on an A7r) is horrific. Basically unusable for many situations. If you don't need the short working distance (which I do, for copy work), and you have the money (which I don't), consider the Sony 90mm macro instead.

Some Sigma A-mount lenses, including the 105mm macro, do have OIS. It doesn't work in conjunction with IBIS, so you have to remember to turn stabilisation off on either the body or lens.

The existing Sigma and Tamron lenses are good enough that I don't really see the lack of updated Sony A-mount macro lenses as much of a problem.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 17:26 UTC
On article Sony FE 50mm F2.8 Macro Sample Gallery (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: This baby (37Mpix) is much sharper than Nikon 40mm (14Mpix) , 60 mm macro (20 Mpix) and Canon 50 mm macro according to DXO lab results. This is the sharpest macro lens ever seen on DXO lab results. Focus hunting results from the fact that you dont know what you are doing. Macro work is the most difficult but the least appreciated job in photography, you have to read and understand diffraction, sync speed, the behaviour of the insects. Full frame is not suitable for macro, APS-C format is the best I believe. The tests are done with FF cameras, and FF camera can not focus on the head of a dragonfly as a whole, and people think that this lens is not good and they buy another more expensive lens.

I use Micro Four Thirds for macro, but I don't agree that full frame is unsuitable for macro work. All it means is remembering to stop down 1 stop more than APS-C and 2 stops more than m4/3 to get the same depth of field. It's only really a problem if the narrowest lens aperture still doesn't provide enough DOF.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 16:33 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 Review (388 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: "the camera is extremely reticent to use ISOs higher than 1600"

As it should be. On 1" format, that's about the upper limit of what you'd normally want to use. In the special case that a photographer needs to stop motion in low light, shutter priority exposure should be used.

Any "auto" feature in a camera must be like this: prioritize the needs of the many above the needs of the few. Unless the camera can detect a fast moving subject and adjust dynamically, autoISO in program auto or aperture priority should try to keep noise as low as possible to the limit of avoiding camera shake.

As I mentioned, it isn't really misnamed as technically ISO isn't an exposure setting - manual mode still provides full control over exposure even with auto-ISO on. Of course that does mean exposure compensation is misnamed when it's only adjusting the ISO...

Pentax aside, I think most camera makers at the moment simply provide the option of auto-ISO in M. I don't see it causing much confusion among current Fuji/Sony/Nikon/Canon users.

Manual + auto-ISO is easily my favourite mode because of its unique combination of control and speed. On a twin dial camera aperture/shutter speed can be quickly adjusted, while changing ISO is generally slower, without a dedicated control.

That can make a big difference when shooting wildlife/BiF in changeable lighting, or indoor events where subjects/situations are different from moment to moment (e.g. taking a shallow DOF portrait one second and a wide crowd shot the next). Pausing to pointlessly micromanage ISO between shots can mean missed shots.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 01:24 UTC
Total: 77, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »