Rick Knepper

Lives in United States TX, United States
Joined on Oct 8, 2003

Comments

Total: 411, showing: 1 – 20
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And of course, for a beautiful portrait, they turn to what camera and incredibly sharp lens?

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2016 at 20:45 UTC as 18th comment
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dr_Jon: BTW I'm assuming it's the same sensor as the Pentax 645Z, so you can compare DR right now...
http://www.photonstophotos.net/Charts/PDR.htm#Canon%20EOS%205DS%20R,Nikon%20D810,Pentax%20645Z

Rishi, you say you didn't participate in this exchange:

Dr. jon: BTW I'm assuming it's the same sensor as the Pentax 645Z, so you can compare DR right now...

Rishi Sanyal Yup. I'm guessing it'll be similar if not identical. A small, small advantage over the Nikon D810 at base ISO.

We have a real-world ETTR'd Raw dynamic range shootout as well, which ostensibly agrees (naturally, one would hope) with Bill Claff's PDR results.

My point being that the characterization "small, small advantage over the D810" is disingenuous. On Bill Claff's chart, there is a 3/4 stop advantage. 3/4 of a stop should be more significant when tested on a "PDR" basis, otherwise, you wouldn't running your own version.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 17:39 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dr_Jon: BTW I'm assuming it's the same sensor as the Pentax 645Z, so you can compare DR right now...
http://www.photonstophotos.net/Charts/PDR.htm#Canon%20EOS%205DS%20R,Nikon%20D810,Pentax%20645Z

Dr jon, I thought it would be clear that I am assimilating two different conversations about similar things. On the Canon forum, you posted a link to Claff's PDR. Here, you & Rishi are discussing results from DPR's so-called "PDR" testing at least initially where Rishi claims as you did on the Canon forum "Yup. I'm guessing it'll be similar if not identical. A small, small advantage over the Nikon D810 at base ISO." I have no dog in the hunt at ISO 2500. So, my comments are directed at anyone who believes it is a small difference on a PDR chart. On Bill Claff's chart at base ISO, the 5DsR is two stops removed from the 645z. So, are you and Rishi claiming that two stops isn't a big deal?

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 14:05 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dr_Jon: BTW I'm assuming it's the same sensor as the Pentax 645Z, so you can compare DR right now...
http://www.photonstophotos.net/Charts/PDR.htm#Canon%20EOS%205DS%20R,Nikon%20D810,Pentax%20645Z

So, I see now where Dr Jon got his response to my post about medium format in the Canon forum.

It is my understanding the Bill Claff's PDR charts show real world DR results vs. theoretical giving more weight to a 3/4 stop difference. The difference in the 5DsR and 645z according to the chart is two stops which Dr Jon characterize as "marginally better".

What's the point of having PDR testing or using someone else's testing to prove a point if all you are going to do is abuse the results?

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 00:53 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)

Only $500 more than the Pentax 645z when it was first released. Pentax has relied on its legacy lenses to fill out their lens line-up (with a few new designs released) while the Hasselblad lenses presumably are all newly designed ( and hopefully sharp across the frame wide open). The sample picks above look pretty good but I'd like to see full size images.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 22:29 UTC as 57th comment
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: I am looking forward to the day a Smartphone can produce the IQ of my 5DsR and 645z so I can get back to enjoying my experiences in the moment while recording them too. :)

Sorry BigOne, I didn't see this sentence appearing in the fifth paragraph of the article before posting, "The research mostly focuses on use of a simple camera for taking snapshots, both in real-life situations like a city bus tour, and simulated scenarios." Even so, I like for snapshots to have decent IQ.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 23:34 UTC

I am looking forward to the day a Smartphone can produce the IQ of my 5DsR and 645z so I can get back to enjoying my experiences in the moment while recording them too. :)

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 08:10 UTC as 8th comment | 3 replies
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

chile7236: It's a camera. Not a fraggin' wifi router. If you're upset about the technicalities of the wifi protocol and how you have to MAKE it work, sorry but pressing a mfg with legal action is kind of dramatic. I don't feel for the "plaintiff"...Nothing about my camera inventory is about wifi ...it's about photography...or rather, my attempt at it. Lack of wifi/touchscreens/video/or other doodads do nothing to detract from that experience.

You obviously do not understand the issues.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 07:49 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Most advertising and marketing statements are misleading but consumers are protected because of the following although they cannot, in most cases, recoup their time wasted.

The Modern Rule: Caveat Venditor

Caveat emptor was the rule for most purchases and land sales prior to the Industrial Revolution, although sellers assume much more responsibility for the integrity of their goods in the present day. People consumed far fewer goods and usually from local sources prior to the 18th Century, resulting in very few consumer protection laws (mostly limited to weights and measures).

The Modern Rule: Caveat Venditor (continued)

Today, most sales in the U.S. fall under the principle of caveat venditor, which means "let the seller beware," by which goods are covered by an implied warranty of merchantability. Unless otherwise advertised (for example, "sold as is") or negotiated with the buyer, nearly all consumer products are guaranteed to work if used for their intended purpose.

For example, a consumer who purchases a coffee grinder that lacks the power to grind coffee beans may return the product for a full refund under an implied warranty of merchantability. But if the same buyer purchased a used coffee grinder at a thrift shop marked "sold as is," returning the product later may prove difficult. While caveat emptor is no longer the rule for consumer transactions, it's important to know when the exception applies.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 07:46 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)

Most advertising and marketing statements are misleading but consumers are protected because of the following although they cannot, in most cases, recoup their time wasted.

The Modern Rule: Caveat Venditor

Caveat emptor was the rule for most purchases and land sales prior to the Industrial Revolution, although sellers assume much more responsibility for the integrity of their goods in the present day. People consumed far fewer goods and usually from local sources prior to the 18th Century, resulting in very few consumer protection laws (mostly limited to weights and measures).

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 07:45 UTC as 99th comment | 1 reply

I see this topic brought out all of the amateur comedians.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 23:32 UTC as 15th comment | 2 replies
On article Lens shootout: Sony RX10 III destroys the competition (485 comments in total)
In reply to:

rwbaron: Canon should be embarrassed with that performance at the long end. Never cared for Sony and don't have interest in cameras of this class but that's Canon getting their butt kicked.

rwbaron, didn't you used to be a Canon shooter?

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 13:03 UTC
On article Lens shootout: Sony RX10 III destroys the competition (485 comments in total)
In reply to:

rwbaron: Canon should be embarrassed with that performance at the long end. Never cared for Sony and don't have interest in cameras of this class but that's Canon getting their butt kicked.

Sorry? Are you drawing a distinction between one pile of do-do and another?

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 20:23 UTC
On article VR / Action cameras forum just launched (26 comments in total)

VR = Vibration Reduction
Action Camera = 1DX II, D5

Link | Posted on May 21, 2016 at 11:59 UTC as 3rd comment

Reporting a bug: When I get a notification of a reply to a comment made in a news article, clicking on the notification allows me see the place in the news article where the reply is for about 1 second before it closes down to the View Comments button (which seems to be a new feature). Then, when I click the View Comments button, it opens at the top of the comments and I have to hunt down the latest reply. Not sure why the View Comments button was substituted for the comments themselves.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 22:03 UTC as 38th comment
In reply to:

sh10453: Very surprised at the disappointing amount of noise in bright sunlight conditions at ISO 100 and 40mm equiv. (looking at the 4th, full size, 1:1, image of the female hiker on top of Mount Teneriffe; arms and legs).

You can tell where focus was placed.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 22:12 UTC
In reply to:

Dabbler: Great shots of these wonderful scenes. Unfortunately it's hard to tell the sharpness of this lens given the subject matter. Maybe a few shots of buildings, clock towers or bridges with hard rectangles would help.

Since the title includes "The ultimate hiking partner?", planes, trains & automobiles (and other structures) might have seemed off-topic.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 22:10 UTC

More lipstick on that pig. These cameras are worth about $1500 judging by their IQ and resolution. I'd take a Sony A7r II and a Leica adapter any day, and I hate adapters.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2016 at 17:59 UTC as 324th comment
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2136 comments in total)

No IBIS?

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2016 at 09:55 UTC as 94th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: So I chided Rishi/DPR in the 24-70 GM sample gallery for not providing a scene with an aperture progression but he did here. Thanks! Looks to me like f4 produces the best edge sharpness based on the posted jpegs. Actually, it was a toss-up between f4 and f5.6 but it appears the FOV changed with the f5.6 aperture (I assume this is focus breathing) or Rishi leaned forward a bit. :) So, I gave the split decision to f4, a very acceptable aperture for landscape hooting. By f8, diffraction starts to impact the image but then one does not need to shoot such a scene at f8, emphasis on the word "such".

Good to know.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2016 at 14:03 UTC
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