Doug Pardee

Doug Pardee

Lives in United States Wilmington, NC, United States
Joined on May 28, 2005

Comments

Total: 230, showing: 1 – 20
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Doug Pardee: I just got back to the US from a 2-week European cruise, with my Fuji X-T10 + 18-55 + 27mm pancake + a sling strap.

I'd actually also taken an old FD-mount telezoom lens with adapter, but after my first day's outing (where I never used it) I decided it was just too much to carry -- yeah, I'm old. I didn't miss it the rest of the trip.

I dearly missed having GPS. I'd like to have had my photos geo-marked, but that was out of the question. My Fuji offers a very clunky "transfer GPS coordinates from mobile phone and use those same coordinates for a few hours" mode, but my mobile phone refused to activate its GPS unless I enabled roaming ($$$). Curse you, Verizon.

I kept one hand on the camera pretty much at all times to foil the unrehabilitated miscreants. Especially with the pancake prime mounted, my silver X-T10 looks like some ancient film camera, so not a prime target anyway.

Since it was a cruise, opportunities to buy batteries, chargers, and such were minimal to non-existent.

(more thoughts)

Many museums and historic churches don't permit flash photography, and the churches are often dark and dimly lit. Good high-ISO performance is a big deal. A reliable auto-ISO is also very helpful for popping in and out of darker areas, especially when coupled with a good Program mode implementation. (Example of a bad P mode implementation: my old Canon APS-C DSLR wants to stop the lens down to f/32 in daylight conditions.)

The darker areas also require an AF system capable of working in low light. Bright daylight scenes often have both specular reflections and deep shadows, challenging the metering system.

Some may find a usable pop-up flash valuable.

Alas, the Fuji cameras don't offer the user-programmable custom modes (usually called C1, C2, C3 by other brands) that allow entire banks of camera settings to be quickly activated for specific shooting conditions. Fuji's C1-C7 are merely virtual film types for the JPEG engine.

Lens selection is, of course, important.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2017 at 10:07 UTC
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: I just got back to the US from a 2-week European cruise, with my Fuji X-T10 + 18-55 + 27mm pancake + a sling strap.

I'd actually also taken an old FD-mount telezoom lens with adapter, but after my first day's outing (where I never used it) I decided it was just too much to carry -- yeah, I'm old. I didn't miss it the rest of the trip.

I dearly missed having GPS. I'd like to have had my photos geo-marked, but that was out of the question. My Fuji offers a very clunky "transfer GPS coordinates from mobile phone and use those same coordinates for a few hours" mode, but my mobile phone refused to activate its GPS unless I enabled roaming ($$$). Curse you, Verizon.

I kept one hand on the camera pretty much at all times to foil the unrehabilitated miscreants. Especially with the pancake prime mounted, my silver X-T10 looks like some ancient film camera, so not a prime target anyway.

Since it was a cruise, opportunities to buy batteries, chargers, and such were minimal to non-existent.

(continued)

Since I didn't have roaming enabled, and few cruises offer free Wi-Fi, I didn't have much opportunity to upload photos to the 'net. I did, however, back up every one onto my mobile phone. The Fuji app was problematic -- every time the phone whined about the GPS not working, the transfer froze and I had to force-close the app and restart both app and camera Wi-Fi.

With the huge mobs of tourists at every point of interest, I got a lot of use out of my down-tilting LCD for taking "Hail Mary" shots.

At one point things got a bit wet outside. I mounted the pancake lens on the body, shoved that into a quart-size zip-lock baggie which I put inside my jacket, and made sure my 18-55 was safely ensconced in my jacket. At one point I actually had camera+pancake still inside the baggie but hanging from my sling strap, ready for action.

I don't do video, and the X-T10 doesn't do *good* video, so no thoughts there.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2017 at 19:59 UTC

I just got back to the US from a 2-week European cruise, with my Fuji X-T10 + 18-55 + 27mm pancake + a sling strap.

I'd actually also taken an old FD-mount telezoom lens with adapter, but after my first day's outing (where I never used it) I decided it was just too much to carry -- yeah, I'm old. I didn't miss it the rest of the trip.

I dearly missed having GPS. I'd like to have had my photos geo-marked, but that was out of the question. My Fuji offers a very clunky "transfer GPS coordinates from mobile phone and use those same coordinates for a few hours" mode, but my mobile phone refused to activate its GPS unless I enabled roaming ($$$). Curse you, Verizon.

I kept one hand on the camera pretty much at all times to foil the unrehabilitated miscreants. Especially with the pancake prime mounted, my silver X-T10 looks like some ancient film camera, so not a prime target anyway.

Since it was a cruise, opportunities to buy batteries, chargers, and such were minimal to non-existent.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2017 at 19:35 UTC as 20th comment | 3 replies
On article 4 times when a Hail Mary might be the right move (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: Too much cannon shock on that second one, is there no electronic cannon option? ;)

Great shots all in all, a couple I could see becoming much much easier in the future with these pre-buffered burst modes where cameras go back and grab shots off a running buffer from just before you've even pressed the shutter...

Some will always take skill and a bit of luck regardless of the tech.

Should have used a Sonny instead of a Cannon.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 12:39 UTC
In reply to:

DPPMetro: Taking pics at all is a foreign experience for 95% of the people on DPR.

Looks fine for DPR. Of the three examples above, the first is a brick wall and the third is a cat picture.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2017 at 18:45 UTC
On article Google will no longer develop Nik Collection (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

redhed17: I got the NIK Collection when Google offered it for free, and have been mainly using the Silver Efex Pro.

I thought they said when they offered it for free that they would not be supporting it anymore, but with this article, maybe I assumed that. :-/

Yeah, in a support forum thread about the then-new "free" price, Google said something that didn't outright say "no longer supported", but certainly implied that little to nothing could be expected in the future. I think it was in a Nik support forum, which is no longer online.

This "new" message about formally discontinuing support has been up for at least a month. But PetaPixel just noticed it, so all of a sudden it's news.

Link | Posted on May 30, 2017 at 20:02 UTC

I don't see any indication that PC Autosave has been updated. Fujifilm's download page is showing the same 1.0.0.1 version that's been around since late 2013.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 21:43 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (818 comments in total)

Skip the AE-1 in favor of the AE-1 Program. Either one probably will have disintegrating felt light seals scattering bits and pieces through the camera. An inexpensive "seal kit" and a bit of cleaning will fix that up, except for one thing: the focus screen. You can't remove the focus screen on the AE-1 for cleaning, and any attempt to clean it will only make things worse. But on the AE-1 Program, removing the focus screen is a relatively straight-forward process.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 17:06 UTC as 310th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Badbatz: Yep, perfect for super-wide angle, extremely multi-frame processed selfies sporting really big, "thinking" foreheads, prominent noses, and really tiny ears located in the back of the head. And it will be updated to Android 7.1 in the fall of 2018 :-)

Isn't dpreview a camera site..? Isn't Samsung G8 a phone ..?
The fact that something has a horn and a nose doesn't mean that it is a rhinoceros...

If you don't want to see mobile-phone news here, click on your name on the top right of this page, click on "Settings", scroll down to "Homepage personalization" and enter "mobile" into the box. Click the "Save Changes" button and you're done. No more phone news on DPReview -- for you, anyway.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 18:47 UTC
In reply to:

DualSystemGuy: Booooorrrrrrrriiiinnnngggg. Where is the 6D II? :)

(@Josh Leavitt) CP+ is already underway. All related announcements should be done by now.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2017 at 17:12 UTC
In reply to:

cshyde: Maybe if they would have developed one camera instead of three this would have worked out. I had ordered on the waiting list at Amazon. Now I'll wait for the next generation Panasonic LX100. I carry my LX-7 every day. Its a step up from an iPhone but not by much these days.

If only Nikon would have done better market research and scrapped the stupid Nikon 1 series (1 buyer?) to concentrate on the development of the DL series.

I'm just guessing, but I suspect the problem was something common to all three, so it wouldn't matter if they were making one or twenty different versions. If it was just a problem with the lens system for one model, they probably would've come out with the other two.

Given the initial delay explanation that they had problems with the image processor chip, I'd speculate they had even more problems with that chip. I'm told that a set of litho masks to make a complex chip can cost on the order of a million dollars (US) these days, so each mistake in chip design is quite costly.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 16:27 UTC
On article Study: people don't actually like looking at selfies (200 comments in total)

A related study found that the majority of DPReview members like posting their opinions about DPR news articles, but very few of them like reading other people's opinions.

Link | Posted on Feb 10, 2017 at 21:55 UTC as 79th comment | 7 replies
On article Feisty upstart: Hands-on with the Fujifilm X-T20 (356 comments in total)

On p.8, "freeing up a button on the top plate for customization" is perhaps misleading. The top-plate button replaces the Fn button that's been removed from the back (lower-right corner on the X-T10). And on the X-T10, the top-plate button was already customizable, so the X-T20 has one *fewer* customizable buttons than the X-T10.

Also on p.8, "the smaller camera doesn't have a front-plate Fn button" -- I certainly assume that like the X-T10, the X-T20 would have the clickable command dials, with the front command dial clicker replacing the front-plate Fn button and the rear command dial clicker replacing the AF Assist button.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 10:34 UTC as 68th comment

I haven't yet found a source that indicates whether the pilot mishandled the drone controls, or if the drone failed to respond to his commands.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 19:31 UTC as 25th comment | 5 replies

I don't understand the "ooh, now I need to get my film camera going again" thing. We already have film we can shoot, and we already have E-6 slide film we can shoot -- albeit not from Kodak. I don't see how Ektachrome brings anything special to the table that would tip a person toward shooting film again. It wasn't an iconic film stock -- it was something that schlubs like me shot while on vacation.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2017 at 22:33 UTC as 31st comment | 1 reply

Card reader (p.7)? Most computers already have an SDHC slot. Yeah, if you don't have an SDHC slot, or if you're using SDXC (cards holding more than 32 GB) and your computer slot can't handle them, then a card reader is probably a good idea.

I'm not a fan of card readers for CF cards because of the risk of bending/breaking pins in the camera when reinserting. However, there's about zero chance a beginner has a CF-card camera, and bent pins aren't an issue with SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.

Since editing software was mentioned (p.12), I think a monitor calibration system should have been highly recommended. Editing on an uncalibrated monitor is a good way to end up with messed-up pictures.

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2016 at 22:32 UTC as 28th comment
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2016 (271 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pavel Muller: Is there really such a thing as a bad camera produced recently by a major camera company? Bad enough to result in inferior photos when used by skilled photographers and used for its intended purpose? (Unintended use example: a camera optimised for stationary objects used for sport photography). Personally I doubt it. Looking at online photos, I generally can easily tell skills of photographers but not the brand names of cameras in the same category.

I think it's the "used for its intended purpose" part that's the issue. There don't seem to be many of us left who will accept a digital camera that's been designed for a particular purpose.

What most people seem to want is an "all-around" camera that can do everything well, including super-high-ISO, slow shutter speeds handheld, tracking fast action, extended high-speed bursts, and 1080p or 4K video. And increasingly, wireless communication.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2016 at 16:56 UTC
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2016 (271 comments in total)
In reply to:

HaroldC3: Oh no my camera didn't win an award it must be crap ;)

Mine didn't win an award, either. But it's a 2015 model, so it's crap anyway.

But if I bought a D500, I wouldn't get it until 2017. By then, it'd be last year's model, and any pictures I took with it would certainly be as boring as the ones I get from my current obsolete camera.

Guess I'm going to have to wait for the 2017 models to be announced. Thankfully, CES is only a week and a half away.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2016 at 16:21 UTC
In reply to:

ORiL: It is funny to buy an interchangeable lens camera with one lens :)

There's nothing funny about it. There are a number of reasons to do it. The reason that's relevant to this article is that beginners have to start somewhere, and the kit lens is chosen by the manufacturer as a good starting point. After they've figured out what kind of photography they want to do, then they can buy the lens(es) that work best for that.

Or for folks like me who long ago figured out what kind of photography they want to do, they buy the camera with the lens that they need. For many kinds of photography, they only need one: fast portrait prime, or macro lens, or the street photography lens (which may be long or short depending on their preference), etc.

There are many pros who keep a single lens mounted on the camera at all times. Some pros have multiple cameras, each with a single lens permanently mounted.

It's not like there are DSLR/MILC-quality cameras with a wide range of fixed lenses, especially not lenses of the quality available in ILC line-ups.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2016 at 15:35 UTC

On page 3, I'd have made a bigger deal about YOU NEED A MEMORY CARD. Most interchangeable lens cameras straight out of the box will happily snap pictures with no card inserted, even though they have no built-in storage. It can be pretty discouraging to find out the hard way that your Christmas Day pictures weren't stored anywhere and are gone forever.

Link | Posted on Dec 25, 2016 at 14:32 UTC as 34th comment | 4 replies
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