Doug Pardee

Doug Pardee

Lives in United States Wilmington, NC, United States
Joined on May 28, 2005

Comments

Total: 308, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

ncsakany: Finally common sense prevailed.

@AustinMN: if you think that legal matters and common sense are somehow interrelated, you're misled. The court applied no "common sense." They applied a court precedent (on a constitutional issue) and the language of a statute. That's how these things are done.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 21:52 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I don't feel like this is an happy ending, not at all.

I would perfer for PETA now to have to answer for what was clealrly an attempt to derive future gains from abusivly establishing themselves as "Animals Economics Representatives".

If that pretension is not nipped in the bud, experience tells me that it will be very difficult to oppose, once "corporate-type-critical-mass" is attained.

We will all then be sued by them, on behalf of our cats, goldfish or parakeets, because "they feel neglected".

@cosinaphile... The court was hamstrung by precedent (in their 9th Circuit) that animals have a constitutional right to sue in Federal court. They noted that they didn't agree, but had to follow the precedent.

"While we believe /Cetacean/ was incorrectly decided, it is binding circuit precedent that non-human animals enjoy constitutional standing to pursue claims in federal court."

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 20:00 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I don't feel like this is an happy ending, not at all.

I would perfer for PETA now to have to answer for what was clealrly an attempt to derive future gains from abusivly establishing themselves as "Animals Economics Representatives".

If that pretension is not nipped in the bud, experience tells me that it will be very difficult to oppose, once "corporate-type-critical-mass" is attained.

We will all then be sued by them, on behalf of our cats, goldfish or parakeets, because "they feel neglected".

The relevant part of the court's discussion is this:

"We gravely doubt that PETA can validly assert 'next friend' status ... (2) because an animal cannot be represented, under our laws, by a 'next friend.'"

The court also noted that PETA submitted nothing showing the required "significant relationship," and that PETA abandoned their "friend" in the rejected second settlement in order to further their own interests.

The court essentially found that PETA had no standing, and that it was up to the court itself to protect Naruto's interests. In that capacity, they found that Naruto's lawyer had provided adequate representation.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 19:49 UTC

SmugMug's got their work cut out for them. First they need to figure out what they want Flickr to be: offsite backup, personal/professional portfolio, photo sharing, third-party photo hosting, social networking, etc. -- and how much they want video to fit into the mix. Then they have to figure out how to get there from here. Affordably.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2018 at 16:19 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply

Oh, the reach I'd have with that 28-70 lens. It'd be about a 300-800 equivalent on my phone. Good thing my phone lens is image stabilized!

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2018 at 20:48 UTC as 61st comment
In reply to:

Mssimo: I wonder if they include action cameras like gopro in the numbers.

GoPro (specifically) isn't a Japanese company, so it wouldn't be included.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2018 at 22:10 UTC
In reply to:

Dennis: I know they said they won't make mirrorless versions of DSLR lenses, but I'd love to see them follow up the 28-75 with an e-mount version of their new 100-400. I suspect they'd sell a lot due to pent up demand from e-mount users who don't want to spend $2500 on Sony's version.

For FuhTeng: the reason that a short flange distance is helpful with wide angles is that the lens won't need large retrofocal lens elements at the front. They might not need any retrofocal elements at all. That doesn't necessarily mean there will be fewer elements, though, as there very well may be some telephoto elements at the back so the lens doesn't have to stick out so far.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2018 at 15:10 UTC
On article RIP Canon's Chuck Westfall, 1952-2018 (71 comments in total)

Chuck Westfall was always very well-informed on technical matters, and he gladly shared that information with the world. How different things would be if every manufacturer had someone helping its users to fully understand how its products work!

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2018 at 17:33 UTC as 58th comment | 1 reply

It's a minor point, and presumably temporary, but as far as I can tell, the FAA has only said that it *will* order those restrictions. I can't find any indication that (as I'm writing this) the restrictions have yet been ordered.

I'm unclear on why the FAA is planning to limit this restriction to doors-off operation (and, depending on the reading, maybe only to helicopters/rotorcraft). Perhaps a better limit would be to make the rule only apply to sight-seeing tours. I imagine that powerline maintenance operations probably use a similar harness arrangement.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 21:36 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

Indohydra: It is not clear whether Samsung is interested at all in competing in the sensors designed for "photographic" sensors. I will assume the the market will impacted mostly for cell phone sensors.

The article says, "However, market leadership cannot be achieved with smartphones alone. Samsung is also planning to grow in the automotive space where CMOS sensors are increasingly used in the autonomous vehicle space and for other applications."

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2018 at 20:33 UTC
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: Briscoe has acknowledged on YouTube that this is a composite video. The aurora was captured in 360, and the moon was captured as a timelapse on a normal camera with a telephoto lens, then he combined the images in post.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfadNyZgl2s

Third comment from the bottom, by "densely". The reply by Briscoe reads:

"densely Good Eye! Indeed, it is a composite video. The difference between the settings required to properly expose the moon and the Aurora is too great to do it in a single shot. The 360 camera was set to expose the Aurora and Landscape, while a second camera attached to a telephoto lens was used to time lapse the lunar eclipse itself. I combined them in post. Without the second timelapse, the moon, even during eclipse totality, was bright enough to cause a white dot in the sky at the settings I had to use."

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2018 at 15:17 UTC
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: Briscoe has acknowledged on YouTube that this is a composite video. The aurora was captured in 360, and the moon was captured as a timelapse on a normal camera with a telephoto lens, then he combined the images in post.

He posted it as a comment on the YouTube page after you'd posted this article. It wasn't there when you looked. :)

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2018 at 21:16 UTC

Briscoe has acknowledged on YouTube that this is a composite video. The aurora was captured in 360, and the moon was captured as a timelapse on a normal camera with a telephoto lens, then he combined the images in post.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2018 at 20:36 UTC as 20th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

CallMeAlan: The words 'may' and 'tenuous' make the whole deal very suspect. If she was attempting to fly round the world don't you think she'd have her camera with her, and, if so, it too would be at the bottom of the ocean? There is simply no provenance.

As for having the camera with her, the seller's description says that Earhart didn't care for the Leica and gave it to the seller's grandfather (she'd received it as a present herself), and is thought to have used a Kodak folder instead.

In my mind, that automatically makes it not Earhart's camera. She might have tried to use it a few times, but I don't see how that counts for much. Earhart's camera would've been the Kodak folder if the above is correct.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2018 at 18:48 UTC
In reply to:

FoxShutter: Try to shoot the US shuttles. I doubt we’ll see any articles anywhere afterwards :)

There might be an article, if one used sufficiently spectacular methods for breaking into the museums after-hours.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2018 at 14:58 UTC
In reply to:

peripheralfocus: It's certain that this gentleman has more sources of information than just his personal opinion generator.

Maybe he reads the forums and article comments on DPReview. The number of industry experts here is incredible.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2018 at 14:27 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: That's good progress. The 8-bit JPEG format had shown its age a long time ago (introduced in early 1990s, when digital photography was in its infancy).
The HEIF format supports 16-bit at about 50% the size of JPEG.
HEIC is also known as H.265.

To be rather pedantic -- and given the total lack of interest in the differences between JPEG, JFIF, and EXIF -- probably in vain...

HEVC is the video encoding also known as H.265. HEIF (ISO 23008-12) is a container format that can contain images, image sequences, and audio in various formats, including HEVC. HEIC is Apple's name for a HEIF container that contains a still image that was processed through an HEVC encoder.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 17:45 UTC
In reply to:

Mark Turney: When we moved from more discreet components to IC’s in computers and other electronic devices, diagnostics became more specialized and repairs more difficult. Similarly, the sizing down of mobile devices is following a similar track. No surprise ... the price we pay for cramming more features into smaller packages. The Universe doesn’t provide free lunches!

Some other manufacturers make phones that can easily be repaired. My LG G5 is rated 8/10 by iFixit (compared with 4/10 for this one). But manufacturers don't make money on repairs -- they make money on replacements.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 14:14 UTC

This is only available for Android Oreo.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 23:15 UTC as 7th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

tedolf: 25mm is awfully short for a macro lens.

What is the working distance from the front element?

tEdolph

tedolf: in the macro-lens world, the term "working distance" means distance from the front-most lens surface.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 21:46 UTC
Total: 308, showing: 1 – 20
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